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10-11-2010
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Peter Dundas for Pucci, Ungaro and Cavalli
I can't believe there is not a post for the fabulous Peter Dundas. I now know why I have been unconsciously tracking his movements through Roberto Cavalli for the expensive jet-set chiffon swish, through Ungaro for its wildly psychedelic colourful maxi dresses and at Pucci for keeping the jet set retro glamour but adding a darker rockier edge.
Love him and want to be his muse


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10-11-2010
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Been secretly waiting for this thread

UK Bazaar September 2010
'KING OF COOL'
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10-11-2010
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UK Marie Claire December 2010



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10-11-2010
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Interview October 2010
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Quote:
In his two years at Emilio Pucci, designer Peter Dundas has shepherded forth a youth movement at the 63-year-old Italian house—one that has both tapped into the romantically lavish ’60s European lifestyle out of which it was born and served as a reminder of a kind of glamour that has nearly begun to vanish from fashion. The original Pucci, Emilio, who died in 1992, founded the label in 1947 in Florence, Italy. Three years later, he opened his first boutique, which was dedicated to resort clothing, on the island of Capri, before expanding into dresses featuring the kind of boldly colored, neo-psychedelic pop patterns that would become his signature. It was a testament to the vividness (and maybe even the trippiness) of Pucci’s vision that a diverse range of iconic women of the era, including Sophia Loren, Marilyn Monroe, and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, all wore his clothes. When Dundas was recruited in 2008 to design for Pucci after the departure of Matthew Williamson, who had served as Pucci’s creative director for the previous six seasons, he seized on that idea: that the brand was built around something more than a beachy flamboyance—that it was about a kind of youthful iconoclasm and a way of being and moving about the world that, in Dundas’s reading, was chic without being fusty, luxe without being louche, and a little bit rock ’n’ roll without being patently rock ’n’ roll.

As most fashion people know, Dundas likes to have a good time, and his clothes reflect that. Even the dresses and gowns he has designed for Pucci, some of which eschew prints altogether, have a kind of subversive mischievousness about them—a surprising color, a body-clinging silhouette, a plunging neck- or back-line. There’s an insouciance about convention and decorum, a kind of sexy, fun-loving, get-up-and-dance quality to the clothes—and, by extension, the women who wear them—that’s perfectly, if precariously, tantalizing. The result has been a broadening—and perhaps a rejuvenating—of the Pucci brand under Dundas’s watch that has transformed his tenure at the label itself into a good time that seems to promise even better ones to come.

If Dundas’s work reflects a deep appreciation for the artful excess of Pucci, as well as for designers like Jean Paul Gaultier and Roberto Cavalli, then it’s with good reason. A quick glance at his pre-Pucci rťsumť reveals that he's spent a good portion of his working life, if unintentionally, preparing for the job. Born in Oslo, Norway, Dundas, whose father is Norwegian and mother is American, moved with his family to Indiana at age 14. After graduating from high school, he set off for New York City to attend Parsons the New School for Design before heading to Paris to begin his fashion career in earnest, scoring a job in Gaultier’s atelier. Stops at Christian Lacroix—who himself designed for Pucci—and Cavalli followed before Dundas landed his first creative director job five years ago at Emanuel Ungaro.

Pharrell Williams recently spoke to Dundas, who was at Pucci headquarters—a grand palazzo in Florence—about building upon the legacy of Emilio Pucci, and where the road ahead might lead.

PHARRELL WILLIAMS: Pucci is based in Florence?

PETER DUNDAS: Yes. I mean, it’s probably one of the most beautiful cities in Italy. It’s very quiet as well—there’s not much nightlife—so it definitely keeps me focused on the work. You just got back from Paris?

WILLIAMS: Yeah. That’s a beautiful city too.

DUNDAS: Do you have a place there? Or do you stay in hotels?

WILLIAMS: You know, I’ve debated that for a decade. Like 10 years ago I almost bought a flat there just to have a place there in the art district, but my manager at the time convinced me not to. I regret it though, because my experiences being there would have been very different if I’d been staying in my own place.

DUNDAS: Well, he was probably afraid of losing you there or something, because Paris is one of the most incredible places to live. Once you get bitten by the city, you never leave. I just got a place there two years ago, and that’s like my main base in a way, because I feel like I have to go back every so often. It just grows on you—the look of the city, the way people hang out there. If you’re in Europe, it’s good for that.

WILLIAMS: It’s a lovely place. So, as you know, I’m a fan of yours. I think you’re a very smart designer who is working at a classic brand. How has it been for you so far working at Pucci?

DUNDAS: Well, obviously I think it’s one of the best houses in Italy—and one of the most legendary ones as well. That’s why I came here. I also like the idea of working with a house that has a history that you can collaborate and exchange ideas with in the way you would with another person.

WILLIAMS: What’s inspiring you at the moment?

DUNDAS: I’m not intellectual at all as a designer. Whatever I’m into at the moment is usually what becomes the collection. Like, last year, I was super-into diving, and the whole collection that season became about aquatic life. The year before was my first collection for Pucci, and I was just starting the job and working in his Renaissance Palazzo, where Pucci is headquartered, so that inspired me. I suppose right now what’s inspiring me is this book on Pucci we just did. We just dropped this huge coffee-table book on Pucci. It was pretty much finished when I came to it, so I didn’t contribute too much, but thinking about it made me ask a little bit about what the house means to me. I found this image in the book. It was an old image of Emilio Pucci hanging out by the seaside with all of these women, and that’s exactly how I used to think about this house—more of a lifestyle thing, you know? This beautiful life. So I’m really working on that right now, on trying to get that lifestyle aspect of the house to be as strong as possible. So I guess that’s the inspiration of the moment.

WILLIAMS: Does music play any kind of role in your design process?

DUNDAS: Absolutely. I mean, I think it does for a lot of people. I’m incapable of functioning without music. I’ve always had it in my life. I played the violin when I was a kid, and my mother was a violinist at that point, so it’s always been important to me in one way or another. When I work, there’s always music cranking. I also spend tons of time on the music for the shows. I work with this DJ, Jeremy Healy, and we do, like, four or five sessions during the week leading up to the show where we put the music together. And then on another level, I think my biggest muses in fashion are probably rock ’n’ roll girlfriends, like Anita Pallenberg and Marianne Faithfull and Bianca Jagger—and then maybe Patti Smith a bit as well.

WILLIAMS: Well, let me ask you this: Can you describe your idea of the Pucci woman?

DUNDAS: I think she’s not a Pucci woman anymore. I want her to be a Pucci girl. That’s number one, because I think she should have that vibe that corresponds with today. Pucci—the house is, I think, 63 years old now. It’s an old house. The Pucci woman from the beginning would be 80 years old or something today, so I’ve kind of had to update her. I think a lot of people, when they think about the house, they think of the print. But when people think about Pucci, I want them to think about this really, really hot girl, so my biggest job today is to give her a face and an identity—and I do that by trying to associate that kind of print that people have in their minds with a kind of girl who is free-spirited, rebellious, a little bit rock ’n’ roll, and who has a lot of energy, who is up. All of those things represent the Pucci woman to me today—or, I should say, the Pucci girl. [laughs]

WILLIAMS: You’ve worked for other venerable houses before. How is Pucci different?

DUNDAS: Well, first of all, working for an older house is a great opportunity, but it’s also a big responsibility. The fortunes of a lot of people and families are based on what the results of my collections are, and how successful they are on a commercial level, and how big an impact they have on a trade level as well. So I think I’m a little bit more chill about that today. When I started at Ungaro, I was completely petrified by that idea. I was this Norwegian who people thought looked like a beach bum. I guess I am a beach bum, but they thought I looked a lot more like that than a designer. I was very worried about those kinds of reactions. But what’s super-important when you come into houses like that is to take what they have, but also give it your own twist—and you can’t do that if you’re scared. I kind of like to think about it as having to be respectfully disrespectful. In order to be successful, you have to honor what’s there, but you also have to play with it and push the limits of it.

WILLIAMS: How do you find the balance then between being respectful and pushing the brand forward?

DUNDAS: People always ask me, “Oh, do you ever want to start your own thing?” And I don’t, actually. I think what I enjoy most is the sort of coproduction of things, where you bring something and somebody else brings something and a kind of alchemy happens. For me, coming to a house and bringing my love and respect to it—and, hopefully, earning the love and respect of the house—is the only way to do it. I think of it as my own house in that sense as well. So I like not working from a blank piece of paper. I like that there’s something from the past, some kind of identity that I have to work with. There are these good ghosts around, these good energies that kind of reinforce what you do. It’s like how your parents raise you and give you this base, and you eventually grow up and have to say, "Well, you gave me this, but now I need to go my own way." So, more than finding a balance, it’s about taking the good parts of what you’ve been given and bringing your own thing to it in order to take it all somewhere else—and hopefully, forward.

WILLIAMS: That’s sort of what I try to do with music: to harness whatever energy is already there and see where that momentum takes me. Sometimes you’re spinning that oncoming momentum in a different direction, or sometimes you’re coercing it to consider itself, or sometimes you’re holding it up to a mirror. But I don’t really like to interrupt and come in and destroy everything and start all over. I’m not that kind of guy.

DUNDAS: Do you always know where you want to go in the beginning? Or is where you go based on what you hear then and there?

WILLIAMS: Sometimes I do have something in my head. But, for me, I think it usually ends up being about considering all of the elements, and trying to understand the distance from where we are to where we want to go. You usually wind up finding yourself somewhere in there. Well, I think the house of Pucci has made a very good choice in crowning you king. Your future seems very promising when looking at your past.

DUNDAS: [laughs] Those are big words. I’m just a little baby in all of this. But I hope you’re at least a bit right. I’m having a lot of fun so far.

WILLIAMS: That’s what it’s about.

DUNDAS: Yeah, absolutely. That’s always my downfall—when I start not having fun or not feeling passionate about what I’m doing. But that’s why I love Pucci. There are some design houses that operate on a more intellectual level, but the way Pucci has always worked is more spontaneous and instinctual. So it’s important for me, in creating for it, to really play with the traditions and keep things simple and easy. Ultimately I believe in animal instincts—I think they often end up winning out.
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10-11-2010
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Reading that interview actually made me respect him and like him more because although I like his designs, I have always felt that it wasn't really in accordance with the Pucci brand. Now that I know what his direction is, I am easily warming up to him.

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10-11-2010
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respects Pucci's work. Season after season, he's increasing the sofistication, the sexuality and, of course, the amazing prints, his Summer 2011 collection, in my point of view, was his best collection in Pucci, i think he have Dundas for a long time.

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20-05-2011
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His dresses are all over Cannes this year. It's like on every single event you'll see someone wearing Pucci.

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21-05-2011
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Yep, I made a similar comment in the one of the star style threads. I hope that this is a harbinger that Dundas' Pucci is going to get lots of love from celebs and the LVMH marketing machine.

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21-05-2011
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tlfan, style, hqparadise, modelcandids

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10-07-2011
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I've never really followed Pucci up until Dunda's took reign, even moreso in the last year or two. I love his direction and the attitude he's taking with the Pucci identity!

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10-07-2011
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i absolutely love him. and eugenie she is his muse i think?

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11-07-2011
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Its always been about prints for him I think...

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16-03-2012
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I really like his work for Pucci.

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23-09-2012
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Quote:
Ahead of Pucci's show in Milan today, the Norwegian blond bombshell talks about his four years at the Italian brand

Peter Dundas is every inch the fashion designer, in the gilded mould of an immaculately turned-out creator devoted to his women. Dundasís clothes stand for sex and success Ė the mood has been one of ďupĒ since his first season at Pucci, autumn/winter 2009. During his tenure there, he has moved the house forward to mean much more than pretty signature prints Ė to be a Dundas woman now is to live hedonistically, dancing till dawn, gliding from private jet to yacht to VIP booth at the club. Such a lifestyle obviously requires dazzling clothes. Dundas lives in Paris and works in Florence, and is pretty much the male equivalent of the girl he dreams Ė heís wearing a white blazer, an unbuttoned shirt and alligator boots when he sits down to chat to Dazed during a rare visit to London.

Dazed Digital: Do you think if you had your own eponymous label it would be similar to your vision for Pucci?
Peter Dundas: Probably. I think Iíve always had the same type of girl in mind. For Pucci sheís inherently a little bit more colourful, but her vibe is the same Ė I like a girl who has fun but has a brain, a sense of humour, who wears clothes that make her happy and make her feel special. If I was a girl I would want that. So I like girls that do.

DD: Your clothes seem at home in the night, as part of a hyper-glamorous scene...
Peter Dundas: They tend to be worn at night very much and I think that inspires me because itís a lifestyle. I do things that are considered Ďglamí, so they obviously look good under the lights.

DD: Have you always had this viewpoint?
Peter Dundas: No, but I always loved a good night out on the tiles. (laughs) So itís more apt to take it from there...

DD: Where is good for a night out?
Peter Dundas: Now Iíve become very grown-up and a very serious designer, so you have to tell me! Last time I was in London I was at The Box. I go to the usual places Ė Raspoutine in Paris, The Penthouse at the Standard in New York. I actually live on top of a nightclub in Paris. You can see where there might be moments of stress, having lived through coming home at 4am or 6am after a good night out.

DD: Sounds noisy. Doesnít it disturb you?
Peter Dundas: Sometimes. Itís more that it disturbs me when I have to get up at 5am to take a flight and somebodyís having a fight out in the street. Hearing drunk conversations when youíre sober is a really strange thing. Youíre kind of counting, like, ĎOkay, one less hour of sleep until I have to get up.í Itís annoying but you have to try to be indulgent.

DD: Fashion today is more international than ever Ė designers can have their studios outside of the country where their houses are based. Do you feel that you can work internationally or is it important for you to be in Florence at the Pucci headquarters?
Peter Dundas: You need to be wherever your studio is. If you can have your studio on your home turf that works too Ė it depends if your structure supports that and if you feel the need for it. Iíve travelled Ė I moved away from home when I was 14 and Iíve always been on the road. It was kind of my angle when I started working. Iíd land these jobs that involved a lot of travelling as it was no big deal for me, I could take it. Being in Florence in terms of recruiting is an issue, whether people want to move there.

DD: You moved to America at 14. How did that affect you?
Peter Dundas: It happened quite naturally at the time, though in retrospect I donít know if I would have let my kid move away when he was 14. I guess my dad didnít have very much of a choice, it was either that or I went real pear-shaped. But it was great, it was a very new experience for me because Norway was so totally different. I think itís really good to experience different parts of the world. I mean, I would probably have waited a few more years with my kids but I would definitely encourage them to do it.

DD: Have any of these places shaped you in particular or is it all part of the story?
Peter Dundas: Well, thatís an interesting question. I think itís all one thing for me, I have fragments of my life in different places, and it really feels like that as well, like you kind of have certain parts of your existence in a box there and another one there. It comes in handy sometimes. When Iím in Florence, Iím really focused on work and when I get back to Paris I can play some more. New York is another story again.

DD: Your job means that you have your picture taken quite a lot. How do you feel about that?
Peter Dundas: I feel fortunate when I like the picture. But Iím usually very uncomfortable.

DD: Does it come with the job? You dress a lot of high-profile people...
Peter Dundas: When Iím with them and the cameraís involved I feel more than ever like a designer, thereís not that focus on me. I donít think about it very much. Iím part of the crew, a stagehand. (laughs)
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23-09-2012
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....

Quote:
DD: Very embellished ready-to-wear, or Ďdemi-coutureí, has been rising in popularity over the past couple of years. Do you believe the dedication to having three fittings is not in sync with a clientís lifestyle any more?
Peter Dundas: Itís funny, I was saying that in a management meeting last week. There is interest, there is that focus and it has to exist. Sometimes I do projects funny, I was saying that in a management meeting last week. There is interest, there is that focus and it has to exist. Sometimes I do projects that are custom-made because people want that. But you said Ďdemi-coutureí, and I think thatís key as well. Couture, by the original rules, with its three fittings, requiring a certain amount of attention to each garment, is amazing, but I donít think you can always do that today Ė thereís very, very few people that have the time for that. So you can do this demi-couture and adjust something to the person individually, which I like to do very much. I wish I could do it on everybody.

DD: Whatís been your greatest experience so far?
Peter Dundas: On a personal level, it was probably my first show as creative director when I was at Ungaro. I was Norwegian, I didnít look the part and I thought they were going to eat me alive. It was so crazy anyway, I had another job, my day job at Cavalli, during my first season, so I had to do everything at night, with fittings at 2am in my bedroom. Anna Wintour was coming and I had three outfits ready Ė there was nothing to show. It was my first hardcore lesson in keeping light conversation! I really had no idea how it was going to turn out and it turned out one of my most exciting moments.

DD: Whatís on your nightstand at the moment? Fiction or non-fiction?
Peter Dundas: I have blank paper on my nightstand and a pen. Always.

DD: Inspiration comes to you overnight?
Peter Dundas:
Very much so. Often when youíre in that moment of waking up in the morning there are some things that make sense. We are, or I am at least, my own worst enemy, and the design process is about setting your mind free. That tends to happen when Iím in this semi-awake state. For some reason things just seem clearer.

DD: Tell us something we wouldnít expect of you...
Peter Dundas: I bake bread. Well, I know how to bake bread. I donít do it very often.
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