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22-09-2011
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I think when Prada used to use vintage inspired fabrics and prints, Muccia would still cut the clothing in a modern way. So to me, the modern edge of the cut offset the nostalgia of the print. Plus, back then she was one of the first to mix prints (which is everywhere now). For example:



nibs blog

I don't feel that throughout this collection - for the most part. I mainly get a cheap feeling from the "car gimmick", like I've been had. There are some pieces that harken back to her beautiful use of prints/patterns, but the cut is less sleek and sophisticated, although I realize the move is toward a boxier silhouette in general. For example, this coat:



style.com

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22-09-2011
  92
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that rose drawn in bags is adorable

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23-09-2011
  93
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love the bags!!!!!!!love the bags so much!!!!!!

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23-09-2011
  94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Plain Jane View Post
I think when Prada used to use vintage inspired fabrics and prints, Muccia would still cut the clothing in a modern way. So to me, the modern edge of the cut offset the nostalgia of the print. Plus, back then she was one of the first to mix prints (which is everywhere now). For example:



nibs blog

I don't feel that throughout this collection - for the most part. I mainly get a cheap feeling from the "car gimmick", like I've been had. There are some pieces that harken back to her beautiful use of prints/patterns, but the cut is less sleek and sophisticated, although I realize the move is toward a boxier silhouette in general. For example, this coat:



style.com
Yes, you touch on the thing I find most important about this collection. At first I was wondering why anyone would send out the models in such disfiguring (leather?) coats - that are indeed the opposite of sleek - and managing to make the last model on the runway (Poly) look like a huge curtain covered tent is no small feat. Then, it struck me that perhaps this is the best thing about the collection - if the clothes do not enforce a sleek silhouette, instead it gives people liberty to not necessarily be sleek themselves and still wear the clothes....looking no more humorous than your average top model.

So in that sense it would be a feminist message...made humorous by the cars, of course, the clothes may not look like they were built for speed unless you look at the prints.

This is not my favourite Prada collection, but I appreciate the ideas underlying it. And some of the prints and textures are beautiful.


Last edited by iluvjeisa; 23-09-2011 at 01:18 AM.
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23-09-2011
  95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tentacl Ventricl View Post
I would like to ask a question of those women who think they like this collection-

Why do you want to adopt the look, wear the scent, carry the bag, of a 1950's middle American housewife?

In terms of the Prada corporation's 'bet' on 'sweetness' - is sweetness what you really want to feel and convey to the world? Is that what women should now be - sweet?

It's probably not necessary to consider feminism directly but perhaps think of your own mothers or grandmothers, women socialised in the 1950's, and how you try to help them overcome problems caused by deferrence, mundanity, piousness, emptiness, guilt, etc?

Always remembering that other sartorial choices are available, are we really to be nostalgic for a return to such a world?

I think presently that this corporate 'bet' should be seen as deeply offensive. That the correct response should in fact be anger. But it seems that most of you will hand over your money at the counter - dutifully, sweetly.

I'm not being facetious. I ask sincerely. I'm genuinely interested. I can see there could be several possible answers but I'd like to not second guess but hear people's thoughts...
I'm always a little wary of the present generation's eagerness to be nostalgic about any "golden" era of the past for the reasons you mention, myself (look at the Tea Party in the US, for example). The romanticization of the fifties especially.

But at the same time, I respect the effort to forget the bad and "reclaim" the good -- some women just want to play around with these images. The reasons can be purely aesthetic but I imagine quite a few women are well aware of the trickiness of that wholesome fifties image and would like to turn it on its head a little bit (notice the bare midriff styling, for example). The style.com review mentions it, but there's a little bit of toughness in here as well. Hints of something more. Hints of other options.

Is it a corporate bet? I don't know. I have some faith in Miuccia as the style-driver here (and I admit it's because she's a woman, heh), but even if it was a bet, I suppose there's a good reason for it. Maybe the Mad Men obsession is real. In which case, wow...more complicated questions and implications here. This topic could go on for a while.

One litttttle nitpick re: the word "should:" I think women will be what they want and react how they want. Not how they should.

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23-09-2011
  96
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whatever---this hurt my eyes...
i'm not jumping on this party bus...
i'm gonna wait for paris...


(except i liked the swimsuits(?)...some of them were sexy and very slimming...a good combo)

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Last edited by softgrey; 23-09-2011 at 02:34 AM.
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23-09-2011
  97
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I dig the prints and fabrics a lot .....it's so incredibly QUAINT!!!

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23-09-2011
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Usually I like Prada, but this does not move me. It's very average to be honest.

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23-09-2011
  99
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Resort was so incredibly strong and dynamic; full of ideas and so exciting. Therefore, I was personally expecting this collection to have much more of a definitive aesthetic and strong message.

By comparison however, this collection is an absolute mundane, monotonous bore. Everything she could have said and explored was exhausted in the Resort collection. There was nowhere to go from there and I don't know why she bothered?

And on a side note, the attempt at trying to be creative / exciting here, quite simply made me laugh. The jacket that was worn half falling off the girls shoulder? Hilarious! Her attempts at trying to be 'new' are becoming quite farcical at this point. Hopefully she will return with something much more dynamic for Fall 2012/2013.

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23-09-2011
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The only look I really love is the coat with the orange-red roses. This collection just doesn't appeal to me at all as a whole.

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23-09-2011
  101
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I only like some of the skirts where the softness of the material is juxtaposed against the images relating to hot rod cars.

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23-09-2011
  102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdaK View Post
I'm always a little wary of the present generation's eagerness to be nostalgic about any "golden" era of the past for the reasons you mention, myself (look at the Tea Party in the US, for example). The romanticization of the fifties especially.

But at the same time, I respect the effort to forget the bad and "reclaim" the good -- some women just want to play around with these images. The reasons can be purely aesthetic but I imagine quite a few women are well aware of the trickiness of that wholesome fifties image and would like to turn it on its head a little bit (notice the bare midriff styling, for example). The style.com review mentions it, but there's a little bit of toughness in here as well. Hints of something more. Hints of other options.

Is it a corporate bet? I don't know. I have some faith in Miuccia as the style-driver here (and I admit it's because she's a woman, heh), but even if it was a bet, I suppose there's a good reason for it. Maybe the Mad Men obsession is real. In which case, wow...more complicated questions and implications here. This topic could go on for a while.

One litttttle nitpick re: the word "should:" I think women will be what they want and react how they want. Not how they should.
If I substitute 'might' for 'should' does that fix the 'nitpick'?

Because, I think we understand each other very well in fact.

What you're saying about turning the 50's iconography on it's head, yes that's there. Presenting the dress codes with irony, an aspect of deconstruction. It keeps her artworld friends like Carsten Holler and Francesco Vezzoli on side. How clever, how postmodern, they snark.

But Miuccia has said she's making a 'bet' on 'sweetness'. Cathy Horyn has the words in inverted commas so I've kept them in inverted commas. Miuccia's words. Not mine. And that's worth thinking through a little.

Because as the Prada influence passes down through the fashion food chain, the irony gets shorn off leaving only a kernel of pure nostalgia. You see that in the work of the designers who imitate the core Prada messages and silhouettes the following season. What falls off as the trend dissipates is the irony. But this process starts within the Prada corporation. Consider the campaign visuals. The irony is choked off there. It's an object lesson in the strategies of passing fashion branding through different stages, different audiences - from art, through editorial, to commerce.

What the Prada corporation think women want is nostalgia. Lacan is good on nostalgia. He links it to a weaning complex. And in times of threatened security, uncertainty and economic malaise, there is a strong drive toward that which comforts, romanticising the past as you rightly say. The consumption of sartorial product which operates like comfort food.

When the decades referenced are the 20's and/or the 60's, like last season, progressive decades, then that's not quite so pernicious. But, as I can see you agree with me, the 1950's associations are profoundly conservative.

Prada knows that at retail people, generally, don't want postmodern irony. The 'bet' is that, in troubled times, they want to be comforted with unreconstructed nostalgia for the 50's as a golden age. I fear that it might be a good bet. I would like it not to be.

If you read the Tim Blanks review again, whilst it's more at the level of subtext - I will make the points more directly - he's saying exactly what I am. I will post it.

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23-09-2011
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I don't see what's so fantastic about this collection, the american-50's-car culture isn't that appealing imo.

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23-09-2011
  104
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Tim Blanks Style.com

''Sweetness." Miuccia Prada's summation of her new collection was surprisingly direct. But only she could add a contrary gloss to an idea that, on the surface at least, seemed entirely benign. She'd been trying to wrap her head around this paradox: Why should a quality that the world at large considers such an asset to womanhood be so shunned by the fashion industry? That state of affairs is unlikely to prevail for much longer, given the crazy level of influence Miuccia wields over fashion (her dropped waists from Fall are other designers' big statement for Spring). So better ready yourself to Celebrate the Sweet.

Except no one else will be able to do it quite like this. Italian men have two meaningful relationships in their lives: women and cars. Miuccia put the two together—women in cars—and situated them in a moment in time (maybe the last such) when the world was awash with unambiguous hope for the future. That would be the 1950's. If the Prada men's collection for Spring was haunted by the ghost of Elvis, its female counterpart paraded echoes of Marilyn in her accordion-pleated dress from The Seven Year Itch. The models did walk over a subway grate, but it was unfortunately technically impossible to provide the updraft that would have gusted skirts skyward in a re-creation of one of Hollywood's most iconic movie moments.

There were, however, other, equally resonant ways for Miuccia to make her point. The celluloid iconography was irresistible: B-movie roadhouse gals in bandeau tops and leather pencil skirts that had been customized by their spray-painting mechanic boyfriends; David Lynch heroines in varsity jackets and sunray pleats; rhinestone cowgirls in studded Baracutas. If the sweetness in such tough cookies was a little elusive, Miuccia also offered coats in lace or crochet in palest pink and blue and bathing suits that begged for pinup poses round the pool at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Plus, the adorable print theme from the men's collection took an automotive turn. At the very least, Italian manhood will be happy. But the rest of the world should feel just as uplifted when the double whammy of Prada menswear and womenswear hits stores next spring. Dare you not to smile.
---

I dare not to smile. It's benign only on the surface.


Last edited by Tentacl Ventricl; 23-09-2011 at 08:55 AM.
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23-09-2011
  105
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Miuccia reigns the queen of fashion innovation in my eyes. I love how she took multiple elements of the 50s -- the florals, long fitted-coats, cars/diner inspiration, the full skirts, etc. and combined them into a cohesive collection. I'm not crazy about how literal some of the pieces are -- the actual car prints, and I wish they would have held back a bit (just a bit) on the shoes. Instead, I am more inspired by the way she took the shapes and waves of the car bumpers and incorporated them onto the fabrics; as well the flame patterns, and the silver car embellishments on the coats are genius. The colors, fabrics, and textures are exquisite as usual. It's all quite brilliant and wearable, the more I study it, the more I adore it.

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