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02-10-2012
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Actually,

Looking at the campaign with Anja that's viewable online, if they had simply styled the show like they did her and shot it in that environtment, like they shot her, then the whole collection probably would have gone down as a massive critical hit. Oh well!

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02-10-2012
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That 2 for 1 Dior comment is very telling.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tentacl Ventricl View Post
There's also a sort of faustian pact element. An extended spat would serve to raise both their profiles further and potentially beyond the fashion press into the general press. Unfortunately people do love a fight. Has Slimane already brought the industry into disrepute. He might have.

I say Horyn is honour bound to reply and that may well be the last word. If the Pinault's have any nous they'll carpet Hedi and shut him up. Though perhaps the old adage that there's no such thing as bad publicity, only publicity, rings true.
I was just wondering... where the hell is the PR team now? but then again, as you've said, there's no bad publicity, i guess. For my own entertainment's sake i hope this will go on forever, but at the same time if i was Cathy I wouldn't even respond, hedi's response is so self explanatory (starting from the gothic-type of the 'title' lol) it doesnt need a response.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by isa.b.elle. View Post
i don't know if this is the right thread to post it but this pic was posted an hour ago on hedi's official twitter.... not really classy

source: https://twitter.com/hedislimanetwit
"She does some great things... Most notably a book I haven't read. (And won't read)"

"This book I will blindly recommend... to demonstrate the power of my name. (Perhaps it will finally sell.) (I still won't read it.)"

"It doesn't matter if she's not stylish, but I would just really like to rub it in that she is ~not stylish."

Someone alert passiveaggressivenotes.com

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02-10-2012
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an interesting read from businessoffashion.com on the pr department of ysl

Quote:
PARIS, France — A few weeks ago, Yves Saint Laurent’s PR team wrote to BoF, asking that we edit a tweet.

We had shared one of the striking new Saint Laurent campaign images with our followers, referring to the campaign as ‘Saint Laurent Paris.’ Brands often write to thank us for sharing their advertising campaigns with our community, but this was the first time that a brand had written asking us to rewrite a tweet.

What was the problem?

“Paris is only used in the logo and not for the RTW name, that being just ‘Saint Laurent,’” the PR wrote, referring to a number of changes to brand communications implemented by Hedi Slimane when he took the creative reins at the house. As many in the PR and communications world know, however, tweets are not editable. They are also usually consumed within the first hours, if not minutes, of having been published and are soon buried under the hundreds of others that come in their wake. But not wanting to get into a debate, we simply deleted the tweet and edited a corresponding Tumblr post displaying the campaign image in question.

Then, last week, Saint Laurent’s press office sent out a mass email instructing media on the nomenclature we should use when referring to the brand. “The House is referred to as ‘Yves Saint Laurent.’ The ready-to-wear collection by Hedi Slimane is correctly referred to as ‘Saint Laurent’. (‘Saint Laurent Paris’ is used in the logo but not when spoken/written about the collection). Collection credits, should you photograph any items, is [sic] correctly written ‘Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane.’”

Another mass email soon followed, saying that the previous email was “not for official use or for lifting quotes.”

Oops.

It was the latest in a series of bizarre communications from a PR team whose attempts to control communication about YSL — whether coming directly from the brand itself or independent media outlets — seems obsessive. In today’s media reality, where words and images can be shared and commented on by millions of end users on social platforms like Facebook and Twitter, seeking this kind of control is not only doomed to failure, but it is also misguided.

When YSL introduced a new logo for the house, designed by Mr Slimane, on the brand’s Facebook page earlier this summer, minus any explanatory context, they had apparently not considered how their fanbase might react. Instead of adulation and adoration, thousands of YSL’s Facebook fans led a sizable backlash, partially because there was misunderstanding around how the new branding would actually be used.

A few weeks earlier, we thought it would be constructive to set the record straight. So, in an extensive feature on YSL’s new ‘retrobranding,’ BoF took care to explain the details and thinking behind the moves, collecting background information from YSL in order to understand their rationale and speaking with branding experts to gauge their reaction. The piece was widely picked up by other media and credited with helping to clarify YSL’s new branding strategy. But still, shortly after publication, we received yet another email from the company, this time from YSL’s New York press office, asking us to revise our piece without specifying what they thought was incorrect. A follow up email from our team asking for clarification was met with silence.

You see, BoF has always aimed to provide a factual, balanced and analytical perspective and when we make mistakes, we strive to correct them. Indeed, we take this very seriously. So, I must confess my surprise when I was informed by the House of Saint Laurent that I would not be invited to Hedi Slimane’s debut show for the brand because they were unhappy with the “tone of voice” that we have used when writing about YSL.

Upon further investigation, it seems they took issue with the content of some of our pieces.

Specifically, they did not agree with our columnist Colin McDowell’s conclusion that while Slimane’s work at Dior Homme was massively influential and built a huge cult following, “it didn’t always translate into convincing sales.” When we explained our thinking, namely that no designer can claim that every single collection is a commercial success, and politely declined to change the article, we were informed via email: “Don’t correct, fare [sic] enough, we won’t collaborate on any kind of project in the future.”

More recently, the brand took issue with a piece we published, mentioning that some in the industry (including highly regarded New York Times critic Cathy Horyn) credit Raf Simons with pioneering the skinny silhouette in menswear, “though it was undoubtedly Slimane’s reign at Dior Homme that made it a commercial success, bringing it into the fashion mainstream.”

In all my years editing BoF, I have never encountered this kind of ultimatum from a fashion brand threatening non-cooperation. Indeed, every single time BoF has written about YSL (or Saint Laurent, or Saint Laurent Paris) we have received some kind of request to change the article to comply with what seem like the whims of the brand’s PR team, who appear to think that the media exists solely to serve as their mouthpiece.

Perhaps I should have been honoured that — along with Ms. Horyn, a writer who always calls it like she sees it and whom I greatly respect, even if I do not always agree with her — I was not invited to this season’s YSL show. But when a friend offered me a spare standing ticket to attend at the last minute, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to see Hedi Slimane’s debut for myself and I decided to go.

Despite all of the hype and anticipation, it was clear from the first few looks that the collection wasn’t going to change the future of women’s fashion, as Slimane had done for menswear during his tenure at Dior Homme. Everything I saw was true to the codes of the house and very 1970’s YSL — undoubtedly desirable for those in the market for a French rocker chick vibe. But perhaps, the somewhat muted applause and hushed voices after the show were the most telling.

I’m still not sure if attending the show was the right decision. Part of me thinks I should have just stayed away, but as my peer Lisa Armstrong wrote in her review in the Telegraph, “Judging by [Slimane’s] apparent fear of any kind of objective criticism, however, I fear I won’t be allowed back.”

Ultimately, this kind of behaviour is not only arrogant, it also reveals a fundamental misunderstanding of how winning brands are built in today’s world. Successful brands aren’t defined by a set of rules conceived in the control tower of a company’s headquarters and broadcast to the world. They are ideas that live in conversation with the world. They can’t be dictated. They must be nurtured.

It’s a serious wake-up call for a PR team that is clearly living in the pre-digital age.

Imran Amed is founder and editor-in-chief of The Business of Fashion

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02-10-2012
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Originally Posted by mistress_f View Post
OMG someone here is butthurt. I can't even respond to this. Cathy might have been a bit uprofessional there, but as a writer she's entitled to speak her mind. Mind you, so is Hedi, but this is the most childish thing i've ever seen a designer do, at least in terms of 'official' statements. i can't. lol.
I agree, why wasn't cathy invited in the first place? I read her review of the collection, which wasn't that bad...

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^ oh lord, what a PR mess. especially the first part is very interesting. even my first basic textbook on business communication would deem that as a 'MESS'. And the last paragraph is so very true. This feels entirely out of touch with today's media, and it's weird its coming from a pr team working with/under a man that always seemed to understand the internet very well. at least for his own purposes.

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well ok, i reread it and it's pretty bad lol.

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Such a control freak he is. He just p*ssed in headwind.

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02-10-2012
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Lady Gaga's rap rebuttal to Cathy Horyn was better articulated than that, so I can't say I'm surprised to see him dismiss Horyn's art form, as he clearly has no way with wordsmanship. That was like reading a disgruntled preteen's letter to someone they dislike. Let's work on those zingers Slimane, yeah? You freaking egomaniac.

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that response beneath s him, i guess cathy struck a nerve or perhaps this is just a pr stunt to announce the new website.. either way it's pretty lame..

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That tweet is so embarrassing. For him, for the house... Are you kidding me? It's one thing to hold a grudge against this or that journalist—fine. But to openly acknowledge it! And publish such a poorly-written, immature and viciously personal diatribe, from the position he occupies... It's unbelievable! I will be very surprised if the PPR brass doesn't give him a talking-to after this. And to add fuel to the fire by mentioning Dior! It's just so embarrassing for him, I don't even really know what to say.

He missed out on an excellent opportunity to keep his mouth shut.

Edit to add: the fact he called her a poor dresser... It's like, dude, she is a critic. Do you think Alain Ducasse crashed Frank Bruni's dinner parties to comment on his cooking abilities? Does Julie Taymor ask Ben Brantley to act out a scene from Hamlet to justify his reviews? It's just so absurd.

Are we to only accept fashion criticisms from Anna Dello Russo (who proclaims everything to be fabulous!) and Giovanna Battaglia?

I hope he was like, hacked, or something.


Last edited by Dann; 02-10-2012 at 07:08 PM.
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02-10-2012
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Finally SUZY MENKES -

Quote:
The Regeneration Game

PARIS — Three great couture houses showed their 21st-century visions in the closing days of the Paris summer 2013 collections. Yet it was not the much-anticipated Saint Laurent show that won the regeneration game, nor even the recurrent inventions at Chanel.

Valentino, in a graceful, calm and beautifully crafted show on Tuesday, hit the sweet spot between heritage and contemporary.

So much was expected of Hedi Slimane’s debut at Saint Laurent Paris — as he has rechristened the legendary house. And for the front row guests — cool or classic — this was a moment for cheers and maybe tears.

“All of it! It’s everything that I like — but I might need to take off a few kilos to get into it,’ said Valérie Trierweiler, who as partner to President François Hollande is France’s de facto first lady. She was dressed in the jet black of Parisian elegance.

Kate Moss, a wisp of black lace at her chest, was even more ecstatic. “You know me,” she said. “All that’s right up my strada.”

For Pierre Bergé, the late Yves Saint Laurent’s partner and a champion of Mr. Slimane, this was an emotional moment.

“Enfin! At last!” he repeated four times, praising the way that his former protégé had captured a dark, romantic, floor-sweeping masculine/feminine glamour — before breaking out at the show’s end into a symphony of colors on the floor-length dresses.

From the moment that guests arrived at the Grand Palais to see the famous YSL logo illuminated on its facade, there was a feeling of tension in the air surrounding the return to fashion of Mr. Slimane.

As hydraulic cables opened the ceiling flaps, one at a time, to let light flood into the dark room, it seemed like a reprise of the modern production skills that Mr. Slimane had displayed at Dior Homme. He left in 2005 to work on his photography.

The first notes sounded of a mashed-up Mississippi blues tune and a black hat appeared, above a thin silhouette of jacket and skinny pants, but softened with a big, marshmallow-soft bow.

Mr. Slimane’s own heritage appeared in the ultra-skinny pants worn with spencer, or cropped, jackets. Floor-sweeping dresses seemed less certain. They gave a hippie de luxe (but not quite luxurious enough) effect to the collection, except for one perfect evening gown with cascading frills.

Alternatives to pants were awkward: a coat dress undulating across the thighs at the front and sweeping the floor at the back.

The designer seemed to have taken as his touchstone the YSL “Porgy and Bess” collection of 1975, but transformed “Summertime” into something darker — even Gothic in that West Coast underground way.

As though this were a 21st-century road trip down the YSL memory lane, the models wore a sand suede cowboy-fringed jacket. Or there was a laced-up front, as a reprise of the famous Veruschka-on-safari image.

Based on the big floppy bow, Mr. Slimane created upper-body wear that expressed a dark romance. The once-infamous see-through blouse spawned other versions in black lace or with cascade of frills at the shoulder.

Color? We know that French chic is predicated on 50 shades of black. But this was supposed to be a summer collection. A tufted, zigzag-patterned fur over a red blouse gave a jolt of brightness. Then the ceiling flaps went down — and up again — to reveal colorful long dresses. But even they were not enough to give the show a triumphant ending.

Perhaps Mr. Slimane can use the YSL codes next season to move forward from homage to something more dynamic.

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02-10-2012
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A lot of people hate Cathy Horyn, from Lady Gaga(see her rap for Mugler), Armani, Oscar De La Renta,Hedi, etc,because of her scathing and eloquent critiques. I enjoy her reviews the most though, though she is biased at times ( yes she has a soft corner for Raf lol), her reviews are almost 90% on point! I find Sarah Mower/ Nicole Phelps very immature in their critiques compared to Cathy Horyn's.

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I reread that tweet its a bit crass, but oh well everybody loves a good fashion drama lol

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