Tom Ford : Life after Gucci #2 - Page 44 - the Fashion Spot
 
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21-11-2016
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^ thank you!.. I didn't know you could watch full Charlie Rose interviews somewhere! I missed having PBS/TV.. not anymore!

You can tell he's been on a long promo tour and isn't that experienced at it, same answers! but I like what he says about loyalty and not letting people go, which is also related to a good sense of mortality and knowing you can't take time or people for granted. I find people that were brought up more.. spoiled tend to forget that, they feel entitled to discarding time, relationships, possessions...

Phuel, I agree that his work as a designer is vital if you want to fully grasp his work as a filmmaker and the other way around, as it's the case with most creative people, you see different sides and also stages of evolution that explain their current work even if it's through a different outlet. Once it reaches the viewer though, it's another mind, world and effect of how he [the viewer] relates to it.. meaning you can find someone to be an irrelevant designer and a relevant filmmaker, or feel more critical towards how he expresses himself in a certain field, or prefer how he communicates ideas now versus then. Personally, looking at his conception of women exclusively through his clothing aesthetic.. I will never relate to it, I'm not attracted, and in the back of my mind even condemn it lol.. but somehow, I find him very familiar and closer ideologically (even than designers I love!) in filmmaking and his input about upbringing, the desert, conservative/macho cultures, values, weaknesses, emotional fragility.. and I even understand how predictable it is to rebel against conditioning and running either to where he went or what I lean towards.

He was never an irreverent designer but I think making films is the kind of irreverence you find for yourself after your entire system is shaken to its core, which he seems to have experienced with that dramatic exit [hekindofbroughtuponhimself] from Gucci plus that midlife crisis. Even if fashion is his first and more familiar tool for expression, the fact that he calls what he does (rightly so..) not an art and films art and in hindsight one's infinitely more rewarding than the other will probably turn fashion secondary for him in the long run. What's amazing is that he now has a cosmetics line and presents whenever and wherever he wants so I guess it doesn't matter cause it'll be there anyways!

(btw, I felt very understood with his shower explanation in the interview for The Guardian )

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28-11-2016
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Just saw the movie last night and I thought it was wonderful!

I don't think it was perfect, and I still think Tom could work a bit more on really developing the story deeper....I felt the Texas storyline was superb, but I was left wanting a richer and more tangible experience of Susan's current LA life as well as the flashbacks of her relationship with Edward in New York. However, that didn't detract from the overall impact and impression I left the theater with.

All the performances were excellent. I've never had any distaste for Amy Adams, but I've also never cared too much, either. Here, though, I found myself absolutely mesmerized by her. She was gorgeous in a way I've never considered before (especially her character's younger incarnation...WOW!). Leave it to a director with a background in fashion to make that special kind of magic of elevating someone from average good looks to someone that leaves you breathless! Like a catwalk model plucked out of banal obscurity transformed into a goddess! Same goes for Aaron Taylor-Johnson. Another actor who does very little for me otherwise, but goodness gracious! What a babe in this movie! Such a powerful performance, too. He found that rare sweet spot actors rarely hit when playing a villain...at once as despicable as they are charismatic - and a real sense of danger, too.

It's thrilling to see Tom mature as a filmmaker. "A Single Man" was an excellent debut piece, but "Nocturnal Animals" shows a great leap in maturity as a director, and that's so exciting to see! I really hope he continues to create movies of this caliber. It's so refreshing to see something stylish with substance in the movies once more...it's been far too long! I'm with Tom - movies, even at their grittiest, need to elevate reality just enough to be transportive and immersive and fantastical in some way...enough of this lowest common denominator nonsense! I want some dreams! If he keeps it up (which I can't imagine why he wouldn't), he really could end up with some masterpieces of cinema.

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10-03-2017
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Is there any inside info on his S/S 2017 collection? Google wasn't any help.

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10-03-2017
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^^
I believe it will be presented once the clothes will be delivered to all the stores and retailers.
Since he has moved to L.A. there are chances for him to present it there. Hopefully we'll have more info next week.

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16-03-2017
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Tom Ford to show his Spring 2018 collection during NYFW! And he's ditching see now buy now!

From WWD:

Quote:

Tom Ford Bids Farewell to See-Now-Buy-Now

The designer plans to show spring 2018 in New York this fall — and relocate his primary residence and women’s studio to Los Angeles.

NEW YORK — Tom Ford is saying goodbye to see-now-buy-now.

The decision follows fall’s one-season experiment during which he staged a tony, civilized affair at the former Four Seasons restaurant in New York.

For spring 2018, Ford will return to the traditional calendar, but not in London, where he’s shown most of his previous women’s collections. Rather, he will seek a permanent slot on the New York Fashion Week calendar, perhaps at the beginning of the week. “I like going first, when everyone is still in a good mood,” he said.

Ford is not only exiting the London fashion calendar. With his husband Richard Buckley and son Jack, he’s moving his primary residence to Los Angeles, though the family will retain its London house. And he has signed a lease on a studio space in L.A. — the old Regen Projects gallery (yes, Hedi Slimane’s former studio) — where he will relocate most of his women’s design staff. The men’s design studio is to remain in London.

Ford revealed the news in a Thursday morning conversation at Spring Studios, where he’s showing his fall collection to press.

He said that while instant fashion is likely the way of the future, it doesn’t work now for a simple reason: The industry isn’t ready from a basic scheduling standpoint.

“The store shipping schedule doesn’t align with the fashion show schedule,” he explained. The bulk of fall ships in August, “but you can’t have a show with clothes that have been on the selling floor for a month.” While his clothes shipped by July, Ford kept them off the floor until the day after the show. “We lost a month of selling. We had merchandise sitting in stockrooms,” he said.

Ford found that many of his specialty store accounts, though at first excited by the prospect of see-now-buy-now, grew frustrated that the clothes had to be kept under wraps until September.

“The first three weeks of September [immediately postshow] business boomed,” he noted, but ultimately, the frenzy didn’t make up for the loss of traditional long-lead press. Thus his return to the traditional schedule — and to New York.

“I need a home [for showing] and a consistency. Paris is crammed full of competition. Milan — been there and done that. London, I’ve tried and tried and tried,” he said, noting that the latter capital just doesn’t get the same level of international attention.

New York, he said, just feels right.

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16-03-2017
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^Does this mean he'll skip Fall 2017?

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16-03-2017
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^^
The FW17 was already shown to the buyers and all so i suspect that they will release the images by the time it lands into the stores...

I'm not really surprised to see him ditching SNBN. While Tom Ford is a very successful brand, it doesn't have the same capacity as Burberry.
Burberry changed the production and the retail and most of all, thanks to their advertising power, they were able to get the press on board.

It's almost impossible to see Tom Ford clothes in the magazines now. He is totally absent from all the "collections eds". Plus, i think it's good to have some competition. It's still fashion and with a business that big, he cannot just do " à la Alaia".

I think L.A. is a much more inspiring for a designer of his caliber than London. And maybe he will catch that Hedi energy and deliver...
London does not care about big or established brands.

Obviously, for the past 1 year, it showed that fashion wasn't really his main interest. I hope that this will have an impact on him...

Glad to see you back on the circus Tom! Now, concentrate on getting the job done how it should be.

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17-03-2017
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Always hated the concept of See Now Buy Now— totally cheapens the air of high fashion and designer clothing: It’s the providence of fast-fashion/ disposable fashion, and always thought the concept of Tom Ford’s lifestyle branding was above such impulses.

For a label that’s so brazenly exclusive from the start, it’s just so astounding, even hilarious, how he’s all over the place— even a floundering mess when it comes to presentation: He still hasn’t got a clue where he wants to show, and I get the impression for all his bravado and vision when it comes to image-making, he still hasn’t figured out how to show his collection. It’s obvious his filmmaking has become a distraction to his fashion and its presentation, in which case I’d prefer him to concentrate on his filmmaking pursuits…

I like that, at his most confident and best, Tom knows exactly who he’s designing for: HIs men and women are individuals that have already found their style— and secure in their already plush lifestyle to care about keeping up with the newest fashion-victimizing designs. He should always remember this.

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17-03-2017
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Bridget Foley’s Diary: Tom Ford, Coming Home
Quote:
Tom Ford talks about the buy-now experiment and why he's moving back to the US. Would you believe Donald Trump played a part?

By Bridget Foley on March 17, 2017

The big, flat box of Dunkin’ Donuts, assorted varieties, sits open, one column short of the dozen, the only non-minimalist appointment in sight. It graces a sleek table in the upstairs seating loft at Studio 2 at Spring Studios. Tom Ford swears that the box isn’t a regular-guy prop, that he has in fact feasted on the missing sugary quartet this morning. “Four doughnuts and three cups of coffee.” When I express skepticism, he insists it’s his typical morning intake. “What?” he fakes reciprocal dismay. “I only eat fish and vegetables the rest of the time.”

The balance works. Dressed in an impeccable lean-cut suit with shirt and tie, Ford looks as svelte as ever and classically debonair, having left the open-to-there shirts of his slightly younger self behind. Yet I wasn’t invited to talk doughnuts or Ford’s eternal good looks. The primary topic: his decision to “abandon” (his word) the see-now-buy-now approach to showing that only last season some progressive industry thinkers considered at the vanguard of best practices. Ford tried it, staging a tony, civilized affair at the former Four Seasons restaurant in New York. The show proved a crowd-pleaser and the clothes, impressive, garnered him an explosion of press and a major postshow selling spurt. But ultimately, the construct didn’t work, so he’s moving on.

That was just the start of his news. Beginning with spring 2018, Ford will show his women’s wear on the traditional schedule, but in New York rather than in his recent base, London, while continuing to present men’s in Milan, “and not mixing them, at least not regularly.” He’ll likely seek an early slot on the New York Fashion Week calendar. “I like going first,” Ford says. “People are in a good mood. You have to think of the psychology. People have had their summer, they’re not worn out yet from fashion.”

Ford is not only exiting fashion week in London. He and his family, husband Richard Buckley and son Jack, are moving from there to Los Angeles, where they’ve recently bought a heck of a house. It once belonged to Betsy and Alfred Bloomingdale, and had a reported, though most definitely unconfirmed, purchase price, of $39 million. (By the way, Ford offers that Jack is “adorable and freakishly smart.” A photo bears out the former condition; as for the latter, we’ll have to take the proud dad’s word.) And Ford has signed a lease on a studio space in L.A. — the old Regen Projects gallery (yes, Hedi Slimane’s former studio) — where he will relocate most of his women’s design staff, while keeping the men’s studio in London. Phew!

Ford came to New York for a day of press appointments on Thursday. Fall 2017 “is sold and done. But I wanted to bring it to New York and show New York editors,” he says. The trip was arranged hastily, as for a while, he was uncertain how or even whether to show fall after his decision to forego the runway this time out.

The reason: His preoccupation with thinking through his retreat from see-now-buy-now, and what other alternatives might exist. Since reentering the women’s arena, Ford has been in the forefront of experimentation with methods of showing, garnering high praise and vivisection for various efforts. He works from an almost scientific resolve, experimental in the true sense of the word: He goes all-in to test a promising hypothesis with a conviction rare in fashion.

“I don’t have fear,” Ford says. “You have to do what feels right, you have to try things. I don’t let fear stop me. It doesn’t mean I don’t second-guess myself constantly, right up until the end — ‘Oh my God, is this right, is that right? Should that be that? Should I have kept this off? God, should I make those skirts out of Lycra?’…And blah blah blah. But you can’t let that stop you.”

When efforts haven’t worked, he’s admitted it. Now, he muses, only half-joking, that all the luxury types who pooh-poohed the buy-now concept — which were just about all the luxury types but for Ralph Lauren and Burberry’s Christopher Bailey — will garner some satisfaction from being proven right, for the moment.

Yet he still believes that immediacy is the ultimate way of the future. “Doesn’t everyone want everything now?” he queries, rhetorically. However, in the present, see-now-buy-now can’t work for a very simple reason: The industry’s numerous schedules aren’t in sync.

Ford notes he had no production issues — “we shipped in July” — and that during the three weeks immediately postshow, business boomed at retail. Overall, however, “The store shipping schedule doesn’t align with the fashion show schedule.” The bulk of fall ships in August, “but you can’t have a show with clothes that have been on the selling floor for a month.” Ford kept his off the floor until the day after the show, insisting that his retail partners did the same. “We lost a month of selling. We had merchandise sitting in stockrooms all over the world.” Many of those retailers, though at first excited by the prospect of see-now-buy-now, grew frustrated that the clothes had to be kept under wraps until September.

Ultimately, the focused frenzy didn’t make up for the loss of traditional long-lead press and the additional selling time. Spring would create a different issue, given its shorter lead time. “Our clothes are just now fully in the stores, and we have missed all the fashion weeks,” Ford notes.

Thus, his return to the traditional schedule. And his permanent (at least for now) runway migration to New York. After the success of his second directorial film effort, “Nocturnal Animals,” Ford wants to spend the next few years focusing solely on fashion. He is definitely in growth mode, particularly with women’s. Men’s accounts for about 60 percent of his business and women’s, 40, a ratio he’d like to reverse. But he admits to a stronger comfort level in the men’s arena. “I’m my own muse. On a good day, I can look 45. I’m a sample size 48, and if I want it for myself, I make it.” A recent addition, underwear, in store for fourth quarter, is men’s only for now. “I thought it was time my name was wrapped around the hips of 25-year-old men, boys. I’ve been waiting to say that,” he offers, in his typical deadpan delivery.

He thinks that having a regular presence on the traditional women’s schedule will support a structure that will benefit that side of the business. “I need a home for fashion shows and a consistency, so that you can start to think, ‘OK, this is where he shows, this is what it’s about, this is what he did last season, this is what he’s doing now. There’s a certain consistency,” he says. “Paris is crammed full of competition; Milan, been there, done that.… London, I’ve tried and tried and tried, and honestly London Fashion Week is not the same. It doesn’t attract the international press. So I needed to pick one. And the shows I’ve had in New York have worked very well.”

The residential move, from London to Los Angeles, is more nuanced. Having spent the better part of a year in Los Angeles because of the film, he was reminded of the appeal of sunshine after 18 years in “dark London.” That move is a homecoming of sorts, a concept that appeals to Ford now more than ever, as a family man who’s admittedly no spring chicken himself. “I grew up in the American West. The older I get, the more pulled back I am to a more rural…” perhaps conjuring images of his soon-to-be-residence, he rethinks “rural” “…I need sunshine. L.A. is the least city of all cities.” His parents live on the West Coast, as does his sister and her children. “Jack has a family there. A lot of it is personal.”

The presidential election also impacted Ford’s decision to move, surprisingly so. Unlike those celebrities who vowed in its lead-up to leave the country if Donald Trump won, Ford found an opposite pull. “Oddly, it made me want to come back even more,” he notes. “We have a tremendous number of people in this country who feel disenfranchised and clearly we are not relating to or speaking to them. I am at my core American, and it made me want to come back. It didn’t make me want to run away.

“I think when you sense that there is a divide in your country and that there are people who perhaps you’re not relating to, and that those of us who are fortunate enough to live in a world of very liberal human rights and privilege, it’s a wake-up call that we’re not addressing a big part of the country that does feel disenfranchised. It made me feel more nationalistic, if anything. The whole country is not like New York and L.A. and the world that I am used to living in.”
WWD

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17-03-2017
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He's actually just presented his FW17 collection in NY.

http://www.vogue.com/article/tom-for...ear-collection

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17-03-2017
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Ok. THIS feels much more like the Tom Ford I have been waiting on. The pieces towards the end were not my favourite and verging on disaster, but when one or two colours were involved, I loved it so much !

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17-03-2017
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That new collection is fabulous! It couldn't have been better!
It shows in that collection that he was really focused on fashion. This is very different and very elevated compared to the collections he has released during the "Nocturnal Animals" era (FW15-SS17).

That collection deserve it own thread! Fabulous!!

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17-03-2017
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YES! This Fall collection is fabulous. This is what was missing from the Spring see-now-buy-now lookbook. I adore the colored hosiery with those fantastic shoes. Very sharp.

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06-08-2017
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Latest Interview from New York Magazine, August 7-20, 17. Fall Fashion Issue:
(interesting what he says in the last answer about the SS collection)


digital edition of newyorkmagazine via zinio

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06-08-2017
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I need to know when will he debut his watch line....

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