How to Join
the Fashion Spot / the Sidewalk Café / the Art of Noise
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
08-09-2006
  16
front row
 
Dylan.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 362
human effin royalty.
i gotta give it up to this jewel.

  Reply With Quote
 
08-09-2006
  17
rêverie
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: norcal / the philippines
Gender: homme
Posts: 5,471
Quote:
Originally Posted by MulletProof
charming yes. . i dont think one could ever hate her. unless you're deaf! [scroll down, last comment ].
oh well. probably deaf or just plain... i love watching her. she's just so pleasing to the eyes and ears. her voice is magical... very alluring. thanks for that link mullet!

__________________
... they lived and laughed and loved and left ...
pseudo-oz~ tintin!
  Reply With Quote
12-09-2006
  18
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,319
The Songs That We Sing 7" Vinyl


French Magazine August 2006


UK Sunday Times Culture Magazine August 27, 2006

all images ebay.com

__________________
Love is what you want.

  Reply With Quote
12-09-2006
  19
rêverie
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: norcal / the philippines
Gender: homme
Posts: 5,471
thanks missmag! she looks absolutely charming and haunting (particularly the 1st photo)!

__________________
... they lived and laughed and loved and left ...
pseudo-oz~ tintin!
  Reply With Quote
12-09-2006
  20
V.I.P.
 
MulletProof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Gender: femme
Posts: 24,727
yesyes, that first cover....

__________________
Metal teeth of carousels.
  Reply With Quote
16-09-2006
  21
V.I.P.
 
dajrekshn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: in tardis.
Gender: femme
Posts: 7,512
i've just got the cd today and it's already turning 3rd round in winamp in less than 5 hours. BEAUTIFUL...i can't name many cd that had me from the first listening.
There's an obvious AIR impact i feel and hear from the first to the last song, not to mention Nigel's. As for Charlotte's voice

__________________
u mad?
  Reply With Quote
16-09-2006
  22
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,319
Lyrics for 5:55

http://www.allthelyrics.com/lyrics/c...nsbourg/555_2/

__________________
Love is what you want.

  Reply With Quote
16-09-2006
  23
rêverie
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: norcal / the philippines
Gender: homme
Posts: 5,471
^ thanks missmag! that was so lovely!

__________________
... they lived and laughed and loved and left ...
pseudo-oz~ tintin!
  Reply With Quote
17-09-2006
  24
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,319
Musical interlude for an actor
Charlotte Gainsbourg has recorded an album after a long gap and sounds a bit like Jane Birkin. But don't probe her about Serge, writes Dan Cairns

18sep06

DUCKING and diving through the traffic towards the appointed meeting place, the taxi passes Rue de Verneuil. This is the Paris street where Charlotte Gainsbourg's father, Serge, lived. It is also where he devised his daughter's debut album, Charlotte For Ever, in 1986. She was already two years into her film career by then, with three roles and a Cesar award to her name. She was just 15.

Twenty years later, she is -- with efficiency and good grace, but little enthusiasm -- promoting her return to the recording studio. It has resulted in her superbly dark and murky new album, 5:55, which is as intriguingly offbeat as her films. Ensconced in the boutique Rue du Bac hotel she uses as a base for what she clearly regards as an ordeal, Gainsbourg sits across the table with a cup of tea and an expression that suggests someone poised at the crease, waiting for a tricky delivery. You can see at once the watchfulness and deceptive passiveness she has brought to many of her film roles. (Her performance this year in director Dominik Moll's psychodrama Lemming was a strong example.) "I did interviews for my first films when I was 14," she says, "and it was awful. I hated having to answer questions. People wanted to get too intimate, so I put up a barrier from the beginning."


She talks like this a lot, in sentences abounding with the precise vowel sounds of her mother, Jane Birkin, yet with the higgledy-piggledy grammar that betrays the fact she has lived in France all her life. It seems refreshingly like unedited candour at first; later, you begin to appreciate the subtlety and firmness of her approach, and how fleet of foot she is.

In fairness, she's probably being both artful and artless. Ask her if she's having to learn to consider herself as a singer too, now, and she says: "No, but it took me a very long time even being able to accept saying that I feel like I am an actress, because I always felt like an imposter. So in the same way, no, I don't feel like a singer." This doesn't, she says, concern her in the least.

Gainsbourg isn't entirely insouciant. She flew to the US when she was seven months pregnant with her second child to audition for the movie 21 Grams; filming began only weeks after her daughter was born. And she admits to incubating the idea of a return to music-making some time before the French electro-pop duo Air contacted her with the same idea. Nonetheless, it sounds like a fraught experience, with the producer Nigel Godrich (Radiohead, Paul McCartney) having to cajole performances out of her.

"I was so shy," she says. "It was difficult to see how I would get there, because my voice was shaky and I didn't have any breath. We tried all sorts of things to make me a little freer. Drinking: that didn't work. Hiding behind a sheet: that worked. Anything to make me a bit more comfortable."

When you hear this, part of you wants to say, "Oh, get on with it." Her remark several years ago -- "I have no imagination: for the piano (she is an accomplished musician), I can't improvise; for acting, I need a director and a text; all I do is follow other people's ideas" -- can elicit a similar response. Yet Gainsbourg's shyness is not of the attention-seeking, come-and-get-me variety you often encounter in actors and singers. Rather, it seems to spring -- small wonder -- from a childhood spent in the shadow of at least one, and possibly two, extremely needy parents (Je T'Aime ... Moi Non Plus was only the beginning), and under a spotlight whose glare arguably deprived her of anything approaching a normal growth trajectory.

It's a tribute to her, then, that she is so entirely unfinished, unpolished even. There are few niceties. She answers unwelcome inquiries with a rebarbative "Why?", a wary, drawn-out "Right" or sometimes simply "No, no, no". She has an infectious, conspiratorial laugh, though it is as often a portent of evasive tactics as it is a sign of amusement.

Gainsbourg has often referred, without any apparent self-pity, to a lack of friends in her life. "But it's the way I am," she says. "People have friends since their childhood. Well, I changed school every year." She pauses. "In order, maybe, not to ever have friends. I don't know." She comes back to this later, almost as if she's annoyed that some threads of ambiguity have been left trailing. "From the very beginning," she recalls, "when I was quite small, I protected myself. I don't feel I had a tough childhood, although I remember people saying awful things about my parents. It was a bit shocking, what they did, how they appeared and all that. So, of course, I shut myself off, and people didn't, they couldn't..." She leaves another thread hanging. Didn't try to be her friend, or couldn't because she stopped them? She looks as if she's swallowing a hot potato. "Yeah," she stonewalls, with finality.

Growing up in France, Gainsbourg witnessed the scandal that her father's alcohol-fuelled activities attracted (not least his duet with his then 13-year-old daughter on the song Lemon Incest, with an accompanying video that showed them cavorting, semi-clothed, on a bed). But this was balanced by a respect for his genius for les chansons francais that bordered on adulation, and certainly skimmed over some of his excesses. British attitudes were far more hostile, shaped in part by a feeling that this bug-eyed French toad had somehow corrupted the utterly English, and apparently irreproachable, Birkin, but also by a sense that Gainsbourg was all shock tactics and no depth.
Somewhere in the middle was probably right. But what critics consequently missed was Serge's innate shyness behind the mask of mayhem. Accordingly, we've found it harder to comprehend the same trait in his daughter. When I raise this, a sudden froideur descends on the room. "I try not to refer to him too much," she whispers. "For my own sake."

She has spent years attempting to secure funding to turn her father's house into a museum, a campaign that is at last showing signs of bearing fruit. But she and her boyfriend of 15 years, the actor and director Yvan Attal, have recently talked about a move abroad. "It's a wish I really have," she says with unusual force. "Just to move."

Discussing how French, or how English, she feels, she answers, revealingly: "The English was really my mother, it was never me. Because, being the daughter of my father, I always felt very French.

"I can see what my mother gave me, what she made me listen to or see: very English things, like Morecambe and Wise. But with the English, I'm not really comfortable."

On 5:55, the lyrics -- most of them in English, and chiefly written by former Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker -- provide plenty of scope for forensic biographical sifting. Gainsbourg attempted to write some herself, but settled for discussing the subject matter with Cocker. The song Little Monsters addresses playground taunts; Beauty Mark includes the line "Your leading lady needs direction". And the key track, Everything I Cannot See, finds Gainsbourg eschewing the breathy mooching of much of the rest of the album in favour of a vocal stridency that, tellingly, features her most clipped, Birkinesque delivery.

Forced to battle against an anarchically discordant piano part, she sounds, at last, like a singer rather than a hoarse whisperer. "I'm very proud of it," she says with rare gusto. "It's stupid to say this, but it's like violent scenes in films, where you just forget, you have to dive in. That was the same. I just had to dive in and it would be all right. Or not."

Musically, the album -- which also contains contributions from the Divine Comedy's Neil Hannon, the Nigerian drummer Tony Allen and Beck's father, the string arranger David Campbell -- is awash with noirish sound devices, giving off a strong air of illicitness and assumed identity, of which Gainsbourg's father would surely have approved. More a short-let tenancy than total artistic immersion, Gainsbourg's occupancy of 5:55 is captivating but tantalising. Briefly, she's presented as a recording artist.

Next month, her role in Michel Gondry's new film, The Science of Sleep, will position her once more as an actor. As so often with her, what she seems to be holding back is as thought-provoking as what she delivers, if not more so. You wonder how proud she is of the album, how much other people's reactions will colour her own estimation of what she has created. "'That doesn't bother me," she says firmly. As a self-protective mantra, it's a strong statement. Yet, even now, she sounds as if she's trying to convince herself that it's true.

theaustralian.news.com

__________________
Love is what you want.

  Reply With Quote
17-09-2006
  25
V.I.P.
 
MulletProof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Gender: femme
Posts: 24,727
^
thanks for posting that. it's taken from The Guardian, right?.

__________________
Metal teeth of carousels.
  Reply With Quote
17-09-2006
  26
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,319
Femina ~ Septembre 2006


Le Figaro ~ Sept 2, 2006


French Elle ~ Aug 21, 2006


all images ebay.fr



__________________
Love is what you want.

  Reply With Quote
17-09-2006
  27
rêverie
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: norcal / the philippines
Gender: homme
Posts: 5,471
thanks missmag! i love 'em especially the elle cover. she looks radiant with such controlled energy. love her!

__________________
... they lived and laughed and loved and left ...
pseudo-oz~ tintin!
  Reply With Quote
18-09-2006
  28
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,319

Booklet from Press Kit (ebay.fr)



Four Track 10" Sampler Front & Back (ebay.com)

__________________
Love is what you want.

  Reply With Quote
18-09-2006
  29
earthbound
 
La bordélique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 4,857
Did Air contribute to all her songs? They all sound like typical Air, but with Charlotte's vocals. I haven't bought her album yet (I'm planning to!) only listened to demos. I'm just waiting till it gets here... I don't feel like importing.

  Reply With Quote
19-09-2006
  30
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,319
Charlotte Gainsbourg

A review of her album '5:55' (from cluas.com / Irish Music Scene)

Review Snapshot:
Respected French actress (oh, and her parents made a record or two) does an Abramovich-style recruitment drive on the likes of Air, Jarvis-Cocker, Neil Hannon and Nigel Godrich (all influenced by her father's music) and between them they deliver a stylish and confident album of coffee-table pop. Highly recommended.

The Cluas Verdict: 8 out of 10.

Full Review:
Charlotte Gainsbourg certainly has an excellent musical bloodline, but her racing form is poor to say the least. The height/depth of her back catalogue to date is her excruciating pre-teen squeaking two decades ago on 'Lemon Incest', a shock-value duet with her father Serge, followed by a self-titled debut album that makes 'Joe Le Taxi' seem like high art in comparison. A fine actress for sure, but no singer she. Her only notable recording since then was her thrilling spoken-word intro to Madonna's 'What It Feels Like For A Girl'. Twenty years after 'Lemon Incest', can the combined efforts of her assembled indie galacticos inspire her to greater musical heights (e.g. adequacy)?

Fortunately (not least of all for the reputations of her collaborators), '5:55' is a fine record. Gainsbourg's voice (always this album's potential deal-breaker) is unambitiously competent; in acting parlance, she doesn't trip over the furniture. She settles on whispered lilting rather than open-voiced singing, delivering her English lyrics in her mammy's cut-glass Chelsea-girl accent - the effect is similar to that of Sarah Nixey, Luke Haine's co-vocalist in BlackBox Recorder. A whole album of it may understandably be boring for some listeners, but Gainsbourg keeps to her strengths.

Musically, Air offer plenty that reminds us of Charlotte's illustrious heritage. 'Jamais' features the slow, soulful, high-in-the-mix bassline of 'Melody Nelson', and the rich, swooping orchestrations by David Campbell (Beck's father) throughout the album allude to Serge's peerless late-'60s singles. In particular, 'The Songs That We Sing' (the album's best track, with lyrics by Neil Hannon) is unmistakeably Gainsbourg senior, with its icy xylophone and swarm-of-bees string arrangement recreating the cold-blooded glamour of 'Bonnie And Clyde'.

Notoriously shy, Charlotte has admitted in interviews that she had problems with the cold, cynical persona Jarvis Cocker was initially creating for her in his lyrics - but it doesn't show in the singing. 'Jamais', for example, features some typically witty Cocker couplets ("You think you know me, that's your trouble/Never fall in love with a body double") which she pulls off convincingly by virtue of her haughty English accent. She changes gears for more intimate songs like 'Beauty Mark' and 'Tel Que Tu Es', whose lyrics sound like they ring true for her ("I've got a beauty mark written on my skin/Close to my heart/I keep it out of sight/Safe from the world outside.../...my secret part").

That this album sounds so much like a typical Air record just goes to show how much of an influence Serge Gainsbourg has been of them too. In fact, were this the duo's own album we'd be calling it 'Moon Safari II', such is its resonance with the key sounds of their debut - the dreamy soundtrack moods, spage-age sound effects and atonal chord progressions that are now synonymous with Air. Even the Strokes-like guitar/bass intro to 'The Operation' slips into a gentle piano groove.

However, credit must ultimately go to the person whose name is on the album sleeve. '5:55' is hardly daring or innovative - it sounds too much like its collaborators' back catalogue for that. That said, having an album that sounds like Air and Serge Gainsbourg (her own father, after all) is no bad thing at all.

__________________
Love is what you want.

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
555, charlotte, gainsbourg
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:34 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.