Designer & Fashion Insiders Behavior [Read post #1 before posting] - Page 38 - the Fashion Spot
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtticusFinch View Post
Likely already discussed - extension of the above.

"Designer Marc Jacobs has been stealing my ideas, my style, my photos and my concepts for five years. My unique fashion designs have enticed Marc to reproduce my creations across the brands he has his hand in. "


http://styleangelique.blogspot.co.uk...ideas.html?m=1

She must be the only one believing this. This is the cringiest thing i've ever seen.
I guess she invented fashion as well...
I can't believe i actually spend some time to read that.

 
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She's been around for a long time. Every once in a while I'll re-read her blog just to have a good chuckle.

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Oh my God, that was my favorite blog to read growing up! That girl is delusional with a capital D.

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Quote:
Gucci Escalates Legal Battle with Forever 21
The Italian luxury brand has filed a lawsuit against Forever 21 for allegedly knocking off its trademark 'blue-red-blue' and 'green-red-green' stripe webbing as it ramps up its legal battle with the American fast fashion chain.

LOS ANGELES, United States — Gucci has filed a lawsuit against Forever 21 for allegedly knocking off its trademark “blue-red-blue” and “green-red-green” stripe webbing as it escalates its battle with the American fast fashion chain known for taking inspiration from designer brands.

The contents of the filing include a motion to dismiss Forever 21’s earlier complaint against a threat of trademark litigation from Gucci and counterclaims of its own for trademark infringement, trademark dilution and unfair competition.

"Gucci America brings these counterclaims because Forever 21 has challenged its most valuable and widely known marks," according to a copy of the filing seen by BoF. "And further because Forever 21’s legal assault, like its business model, is built on undermining the very notion of trademark protection, which is of critical importance to Gucci America’s brand."

The complaint was made in the United States District Court, Central District of California, at 6am local time.

The lawsuit is the latest move by Gucci to defend its trademarks after Forever 21 hit back against a wave of cease-and-desist letters the luxury brand sent the retailer over of its use of the stripe webbing on several items. The pieces include a silver bomber jacket, a floral bomber jacket, a butterfly jumper, a green tiger motif jumper and a striped choker, all lookalike designs with a striped webbing. The items are not currently listed on the Forever 21 website. Forever 21 filed its case in the US District Court in California in June, seeking protection against a threat of trademark litigation.

In its complaint, the fast fashion giant said Gucci “should not be allowed to claim that Gucci, alone, has a monopoly on all blue-red-blue and green-red-green striped clothing and accessory items… Any use of stripes or color bands on clothing sold by Forever 21 is ornamental, decorative and aesthetically functional.”

Forever 21 could not be reached for comment regarding the latest filing at the time of publication.

While Forever 21 may argue it is not infringing Gucci’s trademarks, it may be no coincidence that several fast fashion players appear to have turned to Gucci for design inspiration at a time when the luxury label has become one of the most influential and successful brands in fashion. Sales climbed 43.4 percent in the first half of 2017, a stellar performance for parent company Kering.

To prove trademark infringement, Gucci must show there is a high degree of possibility that a consumer seeing Forever 21’s items with the striped webbing in question could be deceived into believing they may be Gucci products. Gucci may be able to meet this threshold if it can prove consumers could mistakenly believe these products are part of a collaboration with Forever 21.

“The Gucci stripes have been registered in many product categories for long enough to achieve incontestable status,” says Susan Scafidi, founder and director of the Fashion Law Institute at Fordham Law School. “Forever 21 may not even expect to win. Instead, the fast fashion chain may wish to signal to other brands that sending cease-and-desist letters may prove more expensive than anticipated.” Forever 21’s complaint appears to have a second goal as well, she adds: “to cast the fast-fashion company publicly as a victim rather than a design pirate or a parasite.”

Forever 21 has long faced the wrath of other brands alleging its products are copycats of their designs. This year, Puma, also owned by Gucci parent Kering, filed a lawsuit claiming the retailer had copied three of the shoe designs from the company’s Fenty Puma by Rihanna collection. Also this year, Mara Hoffman, the swimwear brand, also filed a lawsuit against Forever 21 for infringing copyright of her "Leaf" print in its swimwear. A case filed by Adidas against Forever 21 over the alleged use of the sportswear giant’s three-stripe trademark on footwear and clothing is also currently making its way through the courts. Anthropologie, Anna Sui and Diane Von Furstenberg have all have sued Forever 21 over trademark and copyright infringement in the past.

Designer labels often argue that copies not only hurt sales, but dilute brand equity through association with lower quality product. This is especially important for luxury brands, which often trade on their values and wider cultural meaning as much as their products.

But while knockoffs undoubtedly damage brands, some argue that copycats, instead of damaging sales, actually help to drive the luxury industry, creating demand for next season’s items amongst more discerning consumers when previously released designs are adopted by the masses. Over a decade ago, law professors Kal Raustiala and Christopher Sprigman wrote about “the piracy paradox” arguing that copying by mass-market chains helped to drive the kind of “induced obsolescence” that moves the fashion market forward.

But trademarks like Gucci’s striped webbing — a signifier of the brand, its quality and design — are another matter and with its recent legal action, Gucci is clearly signalling it will defend them. Gucci’s first use of “blue-red-blue” and “green-red-green” stripe webbing in the US was in 1963 on products including bridles, walking sticks and necktie cases. US trademark registrations for the striped webbing were issued in 1979 and 1988, respectively.

If Forever 21 does win the case, designer brands may have to re-evaluate the use of trademark protection and even whether there is unrecognised risk in sending cease-and-desist letters. Forever 21’s pre-emptive strike, taking Gucci to court first, may signal that the fast fashion company may no longer treat financial settlements, the common outcome of these kinds of cases, as a cost of doing business in alleged knockoffs, Scafidi says.

Ironically, Gucci’s complaint comes as references to counterfeit culture have become a high fashion trend. Indeed, Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele has made ironic references to counterfeit and copycat culture with in his own designs, notably with “Guccy,” “Guccification” and “Guccify Yourself” logo t-shirts. The designer also caused consternation after a puff-sleeved bomber jacket presented at the Gucci’s last cruise show liberally referenced a bootleg Louis Vuitton coat designed by the Harlem tailor Dapper Dan. Michele later claimed the piece was an homage.

Source: https://www.businessoffashion.com/ar...ith-forever-21


Last edited by whitewine82; 08-08-2017 at 10:44 AM.
 
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^ Just goes to show that the designer's perspective and the legal team's perspective are two entirely different things ...

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It's the pot suing the kettle for being black...

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GivenchyHomme View Post
She's been around for a long time. Every once in a while I'll re-read her blog just to have a good chuckle.
lmao same! Anyway, she completely discredited herself claiming that Marc is actually straight and in an abusive relationship with her. girl needs help and meds.

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^ Oh, now that is funny If there is one thing he has been absolutely consistent with ...

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My God, that girl sounds like cray. I meant she seems like claimed that she's the inventor of photoshoot in front of the paintings or the first woman who wear the stripes dresses. I got second hand embarassment by reading her blog lol

 
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^ There's a name for it ... narcissism

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Quote:
New Book Sheds Light on Karl Lagerfeld’s Troubled Companion

French journalist Marie Ottavi paints a nuanced portrait of Jacques de Bascher, who ignited Lagerfeld's feud with Yves Saint Laurent.

By Joelle Diderich on August 10, 2017

PARIS — Jacques de Bascher, the decadent dandy who was Karl Lagerfeld’s partner for close to two decades, is the subject of a revealing new book that sheds light on the man at the center of one of fashion’s most famous feuds in the Seventies.

De Bascher was little-known outside industry circles until 2006, when Alicia Drake published “The Beautiful Fall: Fashion, Genius and Glorious Excess in 1970s Paris,” focusing on the rivalry between Lagerfeld and Yves Saint Laurent stoked by de Bascher’s involvement with both men.

Lagerfeld famously took Drake to court over the book, but recently agreed to sit down with Marie Ottavi, a journalist at French daily Libération, to share his most intimate memories to date for her tome, “Jacques de Bascher, dandy de l’ombre” (“Jacques de Bascher, shadow dandy,”) published by Editions Séguier.

“Perhaps it was the right time for him,” Ottavi told WWD. “He wanted to correct some of the things that had been written. He didn’t say what, exactly, but he wanted to set the record straight.”

The first-time author also interviewed Kenzo Takada, Betty Catroux, Diane de Beauvau-Craon, Pat Cleveland and other survivors of the excess-fueled Seventies to flesh out the portrait of the troubled de Bascher, who died of AIDS in 1989 at the age of 38.

Lagerfeld portrayed him as cultivated — he was a voracious reader who could quote from Homer’s “Iliad” — and multilingual, with a sharp tongue and a wicked sense of humor. Both men were fascinated by titles and genealogy, with de Bascher fond of emphasizing his aristocratic roots.

The German designer has explained before that they never had sex, despite being together for 18 years. “I infinitely loved that boy but I had no physical contact with him. Of course, I was seduced by his physical charm,” he said of de Bascher, whose wan elegance was immortalized by the British painter David Hockney.

The book’s real revelation is the fact that Lagerfeld — who has always refused to attend funerals — stayed by his partner’s side until the bitter end, sleeping on a cot bed in his hospital room during his final days. He subsequently organized and attended a funeral mass in his honor.

“It’s still a very emotional topic for him, and he opened up as perhaps he has never done before,” Ottavi said. “He watched this man, whom he once admired for his style, allure, spirit and innate sense of beauty, take his last breath and absolutely wither. That’s a terrible ordeal, and the fact that he talked about it was a beautiful thing.”

Pregnant at the time, Ottavi missed her initially planned interview with Lagerfeld in November because she ended up giving birth the day before. She finally saw him in March, 15 days before handing in her manuscript, for two no-holds-barred conversations.

“Obviously, I didn’t want to be obscene, that was not the point, but Karl Lagerfeld did not flinch from any of my questions,” she said. “It was very emotional, very powerful. I was moved because he was talking about that one person that you miss, and I think this man is the person that Karl Lagerfeld misses in his life.”

Ottavi said she was initially drawn to her subject by the omertà surrounding de Bascher, known for his sophisticated style, promiscuous parties and unbridled use of drugs and alcohol — and little else, since he refused to work and never fulfilled his fantasy of writing a book.

“He was shrouded in mystery and everyone kept saying that nobody would talk to me,” she said. “It became a challenge and stoked my curiosity.”

The first person to share his recollections with Ottavi was Philippe Heurtault, who met de Bascher while serving in the navy and later became his man servant and personal photographer in Paris.

In addition to providing insight into de Bascher’s life before fashion, he supplied several images used in the book, including a shot of the man-about-town with Saint Laurent’s former partner, Pierre Bergé, taken in February 1974.

Around that time, de Bascher embarked on a clandestine affair with Saint Laurent, whom he would lock in a closet as part of their BDSM sex games.

When Bergé found out, he severed ties with Lagerfeld, blaming his camp for precipitating the downfall of Saint Laurent at a time when the couturier’s addictions were spiraling out of control.

While Bergé declined to speak to Ottavi, she credits her journalistic approach with helping her gain the trust of de Bascher’s family and other participants. “I didn’t want to be judgmental. I didn’t want to paint him as the embodiment of evil, as he has been portrayed in films, where he is reduced to a caricature,” she said.

Lagerfeld bankrolled some of the era’s most notorious parties, including the S&M-themed “Moratoire Noir(e)” bash organized by de Bascher and his friend Xavier de Castella, which Ottavi describes in graphic detail.

But he was more voyeur than participant, avoiding alcohol and drugs and maintaining a rigorous work ethic.

“I’m a total puritan, but I found Jacques’ adventures amusing. We couldn’t be further apart. I am a Calvinist toward myself, and totally indulgent toward others,” Lagerfeld said in the book.

“Of course I knew about the affair with Saint Laurent. I had been close friends with Yves for more than 20 years. We used to go out in the early days with Anne-Marie Munoz and Victoire Doutreleau. Pierre smashed that to bits. He said I engineered their liaison to destabilize the house of Saint Laurent,” he added.

Lagerfeld was lucid about his partner’s perverse tendencies and wild adventures, but turned a blind eye to many of his excesses.

“I didn’t hold him accountable. I only wanted to see the bright side of Jacques. I was unaware of what he kept in the shadows. He would tell me about what he did when I wasn’t around, but I didn’t ask questions,” Lagerfeld said.

Although she was wary of empathizing with her subject, Ottavi admitted that she admired people like de Bascher and Catroux for their uncompromising character.

“It’s the biting bon mots, their jaded outlook. It’s being fully aware of who you are, the cliché you represent. I find that quite fascinating, and it was interesting how comfortable he was with his lack of ambition and his homosexuality, which he never hid,” she said. “There was just no survival instinct. Today, there is perhaps too much survival instinct, which makes things a little more dull.”

Though de Bascher was part of a long list of people who fell victim to AIDS in the Eighties — alongside Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce Chatwin, Alvin Ailey and Steve Rubell — the author believes he was fated to die young.

“He could not have grown older because he would have turned pathetic, I think. It’s like a big arc, this rise and fall, and here the fall was illness and death, but it could have been falling out of fashion, being irrelevant, no longer belonging to the in-crowd, gently fading away,” she said.

Though she questioned whether he could have existed in the age of reality TV, Ottavi said de Bascher was a precursor of insta-celebrity in some ways.

“He even had T-shirts printed with his name. This was in the early Seventies. Who did that at the time? Nowadays, it would be no big deal, but I thought it was crazy that this guy was doing that at the time. It’s a detail, but it tells you a lot. If he were alive today, maybe he would be an influencer,” she said.
Source: WWD.com

 
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LOL at Stefano Gabbana's rant on DietPrada's comment section about Dolce & Gabbana's copying Gucci

 
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^ Haven't seen it, but the copying is blatant ... it's even prominent in some of the ads. I don't really understand it ... is there some sort of niche market for a screaming D&G/Gucci hybrid?

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Well....regardless of how bad D&G's designs are now...I have to admit @diet_prada seems to be getting too big for their britches. What was once a fairly sincere and funny Instagram account now feels very sleazy and mean spirited, in my opinion...and I've felt that way even before they got invited to Prada and Miu Miu and took over Gucci's Instagram on show day.

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dior_couture1245 View Post
Well....regardless of how bad D&G's designs are now...I have to admit @diet_prada seems to be getting too big for their britches. What was once a fairly sincere and funny Instagram account now feels very sleazy and mean spirited, in my opinion...and I've felt that way even before they got invited to Prada and Miu Miu and took over Gucci's Instagram on show day.
I stopped paying attention to them as soon as they became Gucci's pet. They are now nothing more than an hypocrite sell-out insta-joke. Plenty of people are now commenting on them asking if it takes as little as an invite to buy them out. It's sad.

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