Harvey Weinstein accused of sexual assault - Page 5 - the Fashion Spot
 
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^ Agreed. And of course some of these incidents happened at his house with his kids there. But if you're traveling and want to have a private meeting, what choice do you really have but to hold it in your hotel suite?

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I can't stand Morrissey or The Smiths lol, but I mean.. people are going to have different opinions, especially men.. most experience society from such a dramatically different standpoint apparently that, I've found out, it's so hard for them to even relate to what women are talking about.. I see this among my male friends too, men in their 20s/30s, they do not quite relate to how hurtful or gross or diminishing harassment can be in even random contexts, they don't relate to the feeling that a fight is not even an option and it is another gender that is stronger and historically more violent. This is also a man that hasn't worked in an usual work environment and professional structure, he's spent like 4 decades of his life in a specific scene where women and men would literally lick his shoes for no reason other than a song he sings, and even after saying what he said, they will continue to do it.. anyone that goes to shows or is kind of a fanatic on musicians has seen this.. so nearing 60, he's not going to change his mind and he's speaking from personal experience.

I think journalists are just fishing for controversy when they keep going after people of the same generation for feedback... they know it's not going to be any different or suddenly empowering. They've been conditioned by society and field to pretty much be the same. Why don't they ask someone in his late teens? someone that's still giving a lot of thought on what's acceptable or not? because they'll get something more or less rational and won't have a story..

Moving on, I'm super bummed about Charlie Rose.. of all people..

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Morrissey was well out of order to say what he did, but truth be told I'm more interested what the likes of Harry Styles and Taylor Swift think about this. Not because I care about them, but they have such a vast reach. Oftentimes silence speaks volumes, in this case, not in a good way.

What I am beginning to notice is somewhat of a tide.... people are getting bold to either openly target the victims or whitewash the scenario. Not just Morrissey, Brigitte Nielsen basically called Sylvester Stallone's accuser a liar. The jerk from Gossip Girl also called his accuser a liar, and William H Macy practically said when Harvey wasn't molesting women, he produced good movies! A few more and Hollywood will be ready to welcome Weinstein back! It happened to Polanski and Allen, why would he be any different.

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Let us hope the world has changed since Polanski and Allen, we shall see ...

It's time to be done with generational excuses. Waiting for ignorance to die out simply doesn't work. No one gets a pass, everyone's consciousness needs to be raised. Speak truth to ignorance and privilege, and hold them accountable. Almost 60 is both way too young and way too old to be an idiot. Look at Charlottesville ... those were young people I saw carrying torches. Neither youth nor age guarantees anything.

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A few more and Hollywood will be ready to welcome Weinstein back! It happened to Polanski and Allen, why would he be any different.
I agree with you that this will very likely happen. With Weinstein and the other sexual predators. Hollywood is just appalling.

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Men’s magazines are surprisingly silent on Hollywood’s sexual misconduct

By Post Staff Report
November 27, 2017 | 1:04am

Talk about getting caught with your pants down. Exposés on predatory perv Harvey Weinstein have unleashed a tide of lurid allegations against some of the most powerful men in showbiz and politics, from Kevin Spacey and Charlie Rose to Al Franken and John Conyers. So what do the highest-profile men’s magazines have to say on the subject? Not so much, it turns out.

GQ likes to style itself as a beacon of liberal moral authority, so we had guessed that the December/January issue would suit up for a takedown of the famous predators among us. Instead, Editor-in-Chief Jim Nelson churns out yet another of his pearl-clutching columns about President Trump.

Completely ignoring seamy sex allegations that have engulfed Democrats and Republicans alike, Nelson takes his Chicken Little routine with Trump to a new level. Every morning, “I run to my phone to see if the republic is still standing,” Nelson sweatily confides, “to see if [Trump] has summoned the nukes from North Korea out of their locust sleep.”

Esquire Editor-in-Chief Jay Fielden at least manages not to miss the fact that American males are caught in the middle of an historic reckoning over sexual misconduct. Nevertheless, he elects to dwell not on Weinstein, but on Hugh Hefner. Suffice it to say, a gentleman who reads Esquire might question the propriety of kicking a man in his grave, or even call it cowardly.

But after admitting he pawed and ogled Playboy centerfolds like a “Gollum” when he was 13, Fielden insists that he promptly “grew up,” and has, ever since, been woke to the tribulations of “friends, colleagues, girlfriends, wives, sisters, daughters and mothers” who have suffered at the hands of “adolescent narcissists” like Hefner.

“It’s imperative that open secrets don’t become another excuse for closing our eyes,” Fielden writes in a workmanlike conclusion, finally getting around to the subject of Weinstein. But after reading so many lines about Hefner, as well as deplorable “satyrs” like Wilt Chamberlain and Charlie Sheen who boasted about bedding women by the thousands, you get the impression Fielden is only lately waking up to the finer points of the issue.

Elsewhere, both magazines have pieces on John McCain — painting the US senator in a decidedly independent light. Nevertheless, both also seem to plead, “Look at us — we write about conservatives, too!”

GQ calls Colin Kaepernick “Citizen of the Year,” in an article that’s heavily sympathetic — unaccountably so, some might argue — to the former NFL quarterback who has been all-but-blackballed from the league after jump-starting the kneeling controversy.

We’re guessing one or both of these magazines will eventually get around to in-depth, 3,000-word features on predation in Hollywood and politics. But their current mumbling and stumbling just doesn’t look smart.
Source: NYpost.com

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I thought Brit Marling and Salma's pieces were too good to not be posted here, the best I've read since all of this came out.. especially Brit's.

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Harvey Weinstein Is My Monster Too
By Salma Hayek
Dec 12, 2017

HARVEY WEINSTEIN WAS a passionate cinephile, a risk taker, a patron of talent in film, a loving father and a monster.

For years, he was my monster.

This fall, I was approached by reporters, through different sources, including my dear friend Ashley Judd, to speak about an episode in my life that, although painful, I thought I had made peace with.

I had brainwashed myself into thinking that it was over and that I had survived; I hid from the responsibility to speak out with the excuse that enough people were already involved in shining a light on my monster. I didn’t consider my voice important, nor did I think it would make a difference.

In reality, I was trying to save myself the challenge of explaining several things to my loved ones: Why, when I had casually mentioned that I had been bullied like many others by Harvey, I had excluded a couple of details. And why, for so many years, we have been cordial to a man who hurt me so deeply. I had been proud of my capacity for forgiveness, but the mere fact that I was ashamed to describe the details of what I had forgiven made me wonder if that chapter of my life had really been resolved.

When so many women came forward to describe what Harvey had done to them, I had to confront my cowardice and humbly accept that my story, as important as it was to me, was nothing but a drop in an ocean of sorrow and confusion. I felt that by now nobody would care about my pain — maybe this was an effect of the many times I was told, especially by Harvey, that I was nobody.

We are finally becoming conscious of a vice that has been socially accepted and has insulted and humiliated millions of girls like me, for in every woman there is a girl. I am inspired by those who had the courage to speak out, especially in a society that elected a president who has been accused of sexual harassment and assault by more than a dozen women and whom we have all heard make a statement about how a man in power can do anything he wants to women.

Well, not anymore.

In the 14 years that I stumbled from schoolgirl to Mexican soap star to an extra in a few American films to catching a couple of lucky breaks in “Desperado” and “Fools Rush In,” Harvey Weinstein had become the wizard of a new wave of cinema that took original content into the mainstream. At the same time, it was unimaginable for a Mexican actress to aspire to a place in Hollywood. And even though I had proven them wrong, I was still a nobody.

One of the forces that gave me the determination to pursue my career was the story of Frida Kahlo, who in the golden age of the Mexican muralists would do small intimate paintings that everybody looked down on. She had the courage to express herself while disregarding skepticism. My greatest ambition was to tell her story. It became my mission to portray the life of this extraordinary artist and to show my native Mexico in a way that combated stereotypes.

The Weinstein empire, which was then Miramax, had become synonymous with quality, sophistication and risk taking — a haven for artists who were complex and defiant. It was everything that Frida was to me and everything I aspired to be.

I had started a journey to produce the film with a different company, but I fought to get it back to take it to Harvey.

I knew him a little bit through my relationship with the director Robert Rodriguez and the producer Elizabeth Avellan, who was then his wife, with whom I had done several films and who had taken me under their wing. All I knew of Harvey at the time was that he had a remarkable intellect, he was a loyal friend and a family man.

Knowing what I know now, I wonder if it wasn’t my friendship with them — and Quentin Tarantino and George Clooney — that saved me from being raped.

The deal we made initially was that Harvey would pay for the rights of work I had already developed. As an actress, I would be paid the minimum Screen Actors Guild scale plus 10 percent. As a producer, I would receive a credit that would not yet be defined, but no payment, which was not that rare for a female producer in the ’90s. He also demanded a signed deal for me to do several other films with Miramax, which I thought would cement my status as a leading lady.

I did not care about the money; I was so excited to work with him and that company. In my naïveté, I thought my dream had come true. He had validated the last 14 years of my life. He had taken a chance on me — a nobody. He had said yes.

Little did I know it would become my turn to say no.

No to opening the door to him at all hours of the night, hotel after hotel, location after location, where he would show up unexpectedly, including one location where I was doing a movie he wasn’t even involved with.

No to me taking a shower with him.

No to letting him watch me take a shower.

No to letting him give me a massage.

No to letting a naked friend of his give me a massage.

No to letting him give me oral sex.

No to my getting naked with another woman.

No, no, no, no, no …

And with every refusal came Harvey’s Machiavellian rage.

I don’t think he hated anything more than the word “no.” The absurdity of his demands went from getting a furious call in the middle of the night asking me to fire my agent for a fight he was having with him about a different movie with a different client to physically dragging me out of the opening gala of the Venice Film Festival, which was in honor of “Frida,” so I could hang out at his private party with him and some women I thought were models but I was told later were high-priced prostitutes.

The range of his persuasion tactics went from sweet-talking me to that one time when, in an attack of fury, he said the terrifying words, “I will kill you, don’t think I can’t.”

When he was finally convinced that I was not going to earn the movie the way he had expected, he told me he had offered my role and my script with my years of research to another actress.

In his eyes, I was not an artist. I wasn’t even a person. I was a thing: not a nobody, but a body.

At that point, I had to resort to using lawyers, not by pursuing a sexual harassment case, but by claiming “bad faith,” as I had worked so hard on a movie that he was not intending to make or sell back to me. I tried to get it out of his company.

He claimed that my name as an actress was not big enough and that I was incompetent as a producer, but to clear himself legally, as I understood it, he gave me a list of impossible tasks with a tight deadline:

1. Get a rewrite of the script, with no additional payment.

2. Raise $10 million to finance the film.

3. Attach an A-list director.

4. Cast four of the smaller roles with prominent actors.

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continued..
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Much to everyone’s amazement, not least my own, I delivered, thanks to a phalanx of angels who came to my rescue, including Edward Norton, who beautifully rewrote the script several times and appallingly never got credit, and my friend Margaret Perenchio, a first-time producer, who put up the money. The brilliant Julie Taymor agreed to direct, and from then on she became my rock. For the other roles, I recruited my friends Antonio Banderas, Edward Norton and my dear Ashley Judd. To this day, I don’t know how I convinced Geoffrey Rush, whom I barely knew at the time.

Now Harvey Weinstein was not only rejected but also about to do a movie he did not want to do.

Ironically, once we started filming, the sexual harassment stopped but the rage escalated. We paid the price for standing up to him nearly every day of shooting. Once, in an interview he said Julie and I were the biggest ball busters he had ever encountered, which we took as a compliment.

Halfway through shooting, Harvey turned up on set and complained about Frida’s “unibrow.” He insisted that I eliminate the limp and berated my performance. Then he asked everyone in the room to step out except for me. He told me that the only thing I had going for me was my sex appeal and that there was none of that in this movie. So he told me he was going to shut down the film because no one would want to see me in that role.

It was soul crushing because, I confess, lost in the fog of a sort of Stockholm syndrome, I wanted him to see me as an artist: not only as a capable actress but also as somebody who could identify a compelling story and had the vision to tell it in an original way.

I was hoping he would acknowledge me as a producer, who on top of delivering his list of demands shepherded the script and obtained the permits to use the paintings. I had negotiated with the Mexican government, and with whomever I had to, to get locations that had never been given to anyone in the past — including Frida Kahlo’s houses and the murals of Kahlo’s husband, Diego Rivera, among others.

But all of this seemed to have no value. The only thing he noticed was that I was not sexy in the movie. He made me doubt if I was any good as an actress, but he never succeeded in making me think that the film was not worth making.

He offered me one option to continue. He would let me finish the film if I agreed to do a sex scene with another woman. And he demanded full-frontal nudity.

He had been constantly asking for more skin, for more sex. Once before, Julie Taymor got him to settle for a tango ending in a kiss instead of the lovemaking scene he wanted us to shoot between the character Tina Modotti, played by Ashley Judd, and Frida.

But this time, it was clear to me he would never let me finish this movie without him having his fantasy one way or another. There was no room for negotiation.

I had to say yes. By now so many years of my life had gone into this film. We were about five weeks into shooting, and I had convinced so many talented people to participate. How could I let their magnificent work go to waste?

I had asked for so many favors, I felt an immense pressure to deliver and a deep sense of gratitude for all those who did believe in me and followed me into this madness. So I agreed to do the senseless scene.

I arrived on the set the day we were to shoot the scene that I believed would save the movie. And for the first and last time in my career, I had a nervous breakdown: My body began to shake uncontrollably, my breath was short and I began to cry and cry, unable to stop, as if I were throwing up tears.

Since those around me had no knowledge of my history of Harvey, they were very surprised by my struggle that morning. It was not because I would be naked with another woman. It was because I would be naked with her for Harvey Weinstein. But I could not tell them then.

My mind understood that I had to do it, but my body wouldn’t stop crying and convulsing. At that point, I started throwing up while a set frozen still waited to shoot. I had to take a tranquilizer, which eventually stopped the crying but made the vomiting worse. As you can imagine, this was not sexy, but it was the only way I could get through the scene.

By the time the filming of the movie was over, I was so emotionally distraught that I had to distance myself during the postproduction.

When Harvey saw the cut film, he said it was not good enough for a theatrical release and that he would send it straight to video.

This time Julie had to fight him without me and got him to agree to release the film in one movie theater in New York if we tested it to an audience and we scored at least an 80.

Less than 10 percent of films achieve that score on a first screening.

I didn’t go to the test. I anxiously awaited to receive the news. The film scored 85.

And again, I heard Harvey raged. In the lobby of a theater after the screening, he screamed at Julie. He balled up one of the scorecards and threw it at her. It bounced off her nose. Her partner, the film’s composer Elliot Goldenthal, stepped in, and Harvey physically threatened him.

Once he calmed down, I found the strength to call Harvey to ask him also to open the movie in a theater in Los Angeles, which made a total of two theaters. And without much ado, he gave me that. I have to say sometimes he was kind, fun and witty — and that was part of the problem: You just never knew which Harvey you were going to get.

Months later, in October 2002, this film, about my hero and inspiration — this Mexican artist who never truly got acknowledged in her time with her limp and her unibrow, this film that Harvey never wanted to do, gave him a box office success that no one could have predicted, and despite his lack of support, added six Academy Award nominations to his collection, including best actress.

Even though “Frida” eventually won him two Oscars, I still didn’t see any joy. He never offered me a starring role in a movie again. The films that I was obliged to do under my original deal with Miramax were all minor supporting roles.

Years later, when I ran into him at an event, he pulled me aside and told me he had stopped smoking and he had had a heart attack. He said he’d fallen in love and married Georgina Chapman, and that he was a changed man. Finally, he said to me: “You did well with ‘Frida’; we did a beautiful movie.”

I believed him. Harvey would never know how much those words meant to me. He also would never know how much he hurt me. I never showed Harvey how terrified I was of him. When I saw him socially, I’d smile and try to remember the good things about him, telling myself that I went to war and I won.

But why do so many of us, as female artists, have to go to war to tell our stories when we have so much to offer? Why do we have to fight tooth and nail to maintain our dignity?

I think it is because we, as women, have been devalued artistically to an indecent state, to the point where the film industry stopped making an effort to find out what female audiences wanted to see and what stories we wanted to tell.

According to a recent study, between 2007 and 2016, only 4 percent of directors were female and 80 percent of those got the chance to make only one film. In 2016, another study found, only 27 percent of words spoken in the biggest movies were spoken by women. And people wonder why you didn’t hear our voices sooner. I think the statistics are self-explanatory — our voices are not welcome.

Until there is equality in our industry, with men and women having the same value in every aspect of it, our community will continue to be a fertile ground for predators.

I am grateful for everyone who is listening to our experiences. I hope that adding my voice to the chorus of those who are finally speaking out will shed light on why it is so difficult, and why so many of us have waited so long. Men sexually harassed because they could. Women are talking today because, in this new era, we finally can.
source: nytimes.com

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Harvey Weinstein and the Economics of Consent
The blunt power of the gatekeeper is the ability to enforce not just artistic, but also financial, exile.
Brit Marling Oct 23, 2017

When the Harvey Weinstein story broke, I thought of something my mother told me when I was a little girl. She said: To be a free woman, you have to be a financially independent woman. She wasn’t wrong. I studied economics in college and went to New York to become an investment banker. To be blunt, I wanted the freedom money can buy.

I had a sudden change of heart while working at Goldman Sachs as a summer analyst. I decided that if the world required me to sell the hours of my life in exchange for access to what had long ago been free—food, water, shelter—I wanted to at least be doing something that stirred my soul. This is, granted, a privileged position. But as a young woman that was the conclusion I came to.

I had discovered acting and filmmaking in college, and the more time I spent immersed in it, the more I liked the person I became. I listened more acutely. I was more empathic and imaginative. These are qualities that seemed to me to be culturally on the decline; our culture likes forward-thinking talkers who can turn a profit without feeling too much about who may suffer the consequences—usually poor people, people of color, and women. Acting felt like a noble pursuit and maybe even a small act of resistance.

Hollywood was, of course, a rude awakening to that kind of idealism. I quickly realized that a large portion of the town functioned inside a soft and sometimes literal trafficking or prostitution of young women (a commodity with an endless supply and an endless demand). The storytellers—the people with economic and artistic power—are, by and large, straight, white men. As of 2017, women make up only 23 percent of the Directors Guild of America and only 11 percent are people of color.

Straight, white men tend to tell stories from their perspective, as one naturally does, which means the women are generally underwritten. They don’t necessarily even need names; “Bikini Babe 2” and “Blonde 4” are parts I auditioned for. If the female characters are lucky enough to have names, they are usually designed only to ask the questions that prompt the lead male monologue, or they are quickly killed in service to advancing the plot.

Once, when I was standing in line for some open-call audition for a horror film, I remember catching my reflection in the mirror and realizing that I was dressed like a sex object. Every woman in line to audition for “Nurse” was, it seemed. We had all internalized on some level the idea that if we were going to be cast we’d better sell what was desired—not our artistry, not our imaginations—but our bodies.

It was around this time that I remember sitting in a casual gathering where a straight, white male activist said, “Our gender and race has all the power. So when you want to have sex with a woman you have to ask and get her verbal consent.” He continued, “If that woman is a person of color, she is oppressed by both her gender and her race and then you should really ask twice.” The literalism of his ratio was ridiculously reductive, and his declarative tone off-putting, but I appreciated that he was trying to articulate how complicated it is to negotiate the invisible forces of privilege and power inside sexual encounters. He was trying to help other young men understand why it can sometimes be hard for any woman to find and voice “no” within a culture that has taught her to mistrust herself, or to value herself through male approval.

I emerged from this period thinking about the power dynamics inside Hollywood. If auditioning for parts was largely about seeking male approval, and the stories themselves were narratives I didn’t always politically or morally agree with, then the only way for me to navigate Hollywood with more agency was to become a storyteller myself. That is an easy thing to say and a very hard thing to do. I stopped auditioning. I worked a day job and spent nights and weekends at the public library downtown reading screenwriting books. I did this for years. Eventually, I co-wrote and starred in two films and was very fortunate when they were programmed at Sundance in 2011.

I’m taking you through this brief history because I think it’s important to understanding that when Harvey Weinstein requested a meeting with me in 2014—when the industry had deemed I was legitimate fresh meat—I was, in some ways, in a slightly different position from many who had walked this gauntlet before me.

I, too, went to the meeting thinking that perhaps my entire life was about to change for the better. I, too, was asked to meet him in a hotel bar. I, too, met a young, female assistant there who said the meeting had been moved upstairs to his suite because he was a very busy man. I, too, felt my guard go up but was calmed by the presence of another woman my age beside me. I, too, felt terror in the pit of my stomach when that young woman left the room and I was suddenly alone with him. I, too, was asked if I wanted a massage, champagne, strawberries. I, too, sat in that chair paralyzed by mounting fear when he suggested we shower together. What could I do? How not to offend this man, this gatekeeper, who could anoint or destroy me?

It was clear that there was only one direction he wanted this encounter to go in, and that was sex or some version of an erotic exchange. I was able to gather myself together—a bundle of firing nerves, hands trembling, voice lost in my throat—and leave the room.

I later sat in my hotel room alone and wept. I wept because I had gone up the elevator when I knew better. I wept because I had let him touch my shoulders. I wept because at other times in my life, under other circumstances, I had not been able to leave.

At this point many women have come forward to tell their stories about being harassed or abused by Weinstein. All of them are courageous, including the women who could not find a way out. I think for me, I was able to leave Weinstein’s hotel room that day because I had entered as an actor but also as a writer/creator. Of those dual personas in me—actor and writer—it was the writer who stood up and walked out. Because the writer knew that even if this very powerful man never gave her a job in any of his films, even if he blacklisted her from other films, she could make her own work on her own terms and thus keep a roof over her head.

I’m telling this story because in the heat surrounding these brave admissions, it’s important to think about the economics of consent. Weinstein was a gatekeeper who could give actresses a career that would sustain their lives and the livelihood of their families. He could also give them fame, which is one of few ways for women to gain some semblance of power and voice inside a patriarchal world. They knew it. He knew it. Weinstein could also ensure that these women would never work again if they humiliated him. That’s not just artistic or emotional exile—that’s also economic exile.

It’s important, too, to keep in mind where this power imbalance comes from. In the U.S., women were only allowed to have credit cards in their own names as of 43 years ago. Men had a two-decade head start (the credit card was invented in 1950). In the 1960s a woman needed to bring a man along to cosign any credit application. It’s stunning how recently women were afforded no financial autonomy. This is, of course, connected to the fact that women didn’t have bodily autonomy either. A woman’s husband could beat her or have sex with her without her consent in this country with no real legal recourse until the 1970s.

For me, this all distills down to the following: The things that happen in hotel rooms and board rooms all over the world (and in every industry) between women seeking employment or trying to keep employment and men holding the power to grant it or take it away exist in a gray zone where words like “consent” cannot fully capture the complexity of the encounter. Because consent is a function of power. You have to have a modicum of power to give it. In many cases women do not have that power because their livelihood is in jeopardy and because they are the gender that is oppressed by a daily, invisible war waged against all that is feminine—women and humans who behave or dress or think or feel or look feminine.

It’s a powerful moment when courageous people begin speaking about how they have been harmed, which is a deeply difficult thing to do because it means wading through a swamp of shame you’ve been made to feel. I am inspired by them all. We should let their strength guide our way forward, which means beginning a much larger conversation about the role economic inequality often plays in rape culture.

Men hold most of the world’s wealth. In fact, just eight men own the same wealth as 3.6 billion people who make up the poorer half of humanity, the majority of whom, according to Oxfam, are women. As a gender whole, women are poor. This means that, in part, stopping sexual harassment and abuse will involve fighting for wage parity. This also means women and men in power need to turn around and hire more women, especially women of color, especially women who have not grown up with economic privilege.

Another important step forward would be for all of us to start telling and consuming different stories. If you don’t want to be a part of a culture in which sexual abuse and harassment are rampant, don’t buy a ticket to a film that promotes it. I am as guilty of this as anybody else; sometimes it’s nice to zone out to a film that’s a distraction of epic spectacle. But maybe it’s time to imagine more films that don’t use exploitation of female bodies or violence against female bodies as their selling points. Films with a gender balance and racial balance that better reflect the world we all actually live in. These are challenges I myself am trying to meet, as a series creator, and I have by no means closed the gap between what I aspire to and what I have achieved.

Part of what keeps you sitting in that chair in that room enduring harassment or abuse from a man in power is that, as a woman, you have rarely seen another end for yourself. In the novels you’ve read, in the films you’ve seen, in the stories you’ve been told since birth, the women so frequently meet disastrous ends. The real danger inside the present moment, then, would be for us all to separate the alleged deeds of Cosby, Ailes, O’Reilly, or Weinstein from a culture that continues to allow for dramatic imbalances of power. It’s not these bad men. Or that dirty industry. It’s this inhumane economic system of which we are all a part. As producers and as consumers. As storytellers and as listeners. As human beings. That’s a very uncomfortable truth to sit inside. But perhaps discomfort is what’s required to move in the direction of a humane world to which we would all freely give our consent.
source: theatlantic.com

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I'm not that familiar with Brit, only recall a stunning Interview shoot, but she comes across as very level-headed. Still can't rationalise how someone like her, so articulate, witty, educated, ended up in Hollywood. Classic case of 'when bad things happens to good people.' I'm very intrigued by her observations and anecdotes, which strikes more of a chord with me. She's not merely recounting a horrific ordeal here, I think she's painting a picture which expand beyond just her world.

As for Salma Hayek, no comment, don't think my views will align with those of others on here.

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These are both very, very good (along with Lupita's account that stands out in my mind), and I agree, it's really helpful how Brit tied her experience to the larger picture of inequity. I think she makes a strong case (and there are other strong cases, including the preservation of democracy) for why the wealth gap is unacceptable and needs to be fought as a first priority.

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I think she makes a strong case (and there are other strong cases, including the preservation of democracy) for why the wealth gap is unacceptable and needs to be fought as a first priority.
Spent half the day reading Gail Collins' kindle copy on the lack of agency women had over finance. The idea seemed too archaic, hard to think it only changed in the 70s??? It may seem trivial to some but this form of legislation ultimately served as some form of catalyst to trap a lot of women into marriages, and possibly started the stigma of single parenting!

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What I think is interesting (disturbing) is that women who remember don't talk about it--at least not to me. So much is kept in the shadows ... which is what's so great about this speaking out.

Harvey Weinstein's name is forever going to be associated with this, and of course he's got some very bad karma going--no telling how that will play out. He can't regain the power he once had. But the irrevocable injustice done to the women whose careers he derailed ... it hardly seems enough. Really makes you understand the appeal of public flogging ...

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Spent half the day reading Gail Collins' kindle copy on the lack of agency women had over finance. The idea seemed too archaic, hard to think it only changed in the 70s???
In the year when I was born, women couldn't have bank accounts in their own name. Financial autonomy has been a hard-won state of affairs for women.

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Here is Uma Thurman's sort of response to being asked about inappropriate behavior; she seems deeply, deeply angry (at something that happened to her, I assume) but has made the decision to wait until she is ready to fully speak
Here we go ...

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Uma Thurman Accuses Weinstein of Sexual Assault and Claims Tarantino Almost Killed Her in Stunt Gone Wrong

Uma Thurman has finally come forward to speak out about her alleged experience with disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, accusing him of trying to force himself on her and exposing himself in hotel rooms.

Months after going viral for a tense interview in which she carefully declined to speak about Weinstein until she was “ready,” the 47-year-old actress told her story in an interview with Maureen Dowd published on The New York Times on Saturday.

She alleged Weinstein first whipped out his now infamous bathrobe during a meeting in his Paris hotel room during the afterglow of 1994’s Pulp Fiction. There, she claimed he led her down a hallway to a steam room, where she asked him “This is ridiculous, what are you doing?” before he ran out.

“I didn’t feel threatened,” she recalled. “I thought he was being super idiosyncratic, like this was your kooky, eccentric uncle.”

The first alleged “attack” happened at London’s Savoy hotel. “It was such a bat to the head,” she said of the alleged encounter, the exact date of which she did not give. “He pushed me down. He tried to shove himself on me.”

“He tried to expose himself. He did all kinds of unpleasant things. But he didn’t actually put his back into it and force me.”

The next day, she claimed Weinstein sent her a bouquet of yellow roses as a way to apologize. She returned to the hotel to confront him, this time taking with her a male friend for protection who waited downstairs as she went up to his room with his assistants.

“If you do what you did to me to other people you will lose your career, your reputation and your family, I promise you,” she said she told him. In response, she reportedly told her friend afterwards that he had threatened to destroy her career.

A rep for Weinstein told The Times, “She very well could have said this” in response to her threats to expose him. But the rep denied ever delivering an ultimatum about her career.

“Mr. Weinstein acknowledges making a pass at Ms. Thurman in England after misreading her signals in Paris,” the rep said in a statement to The Times, claiming that up until the Paris steam room, they had had “a flirtatious and fun working relationship” and that “he immediately apologized.”

Elsewhere in her chat, Thurman alleged that Pulp Fiction and Kill Bill director Quentin Tarantino — who worked closely with her and Weinstein on both projects — forced her to do a stunt in Kill Bill that left her neck “permanently damaged” and her knees “screwed-up.”

She alleged no sexual misconduct against Tarantino, but said the two fought for years before he finally provided Thurman with the footage of the crash.

Thurman also told The Times she felt guilty for all of Weinstein’s alleged victims who followed suit.

“I am one of the reasons that a young girl would walk into his room alone,” she said, explaining how Kill Bill became a symbol of female empowerment. “All these lambs walked into slaughter because they were convinced nobody rises to such a position who would do something illegal to you, but they do. … I stand as both a person who was subjected to it and a person who was then also part of the cloud cover.”

A spokesperson for Weinstein said in a statement to PEOPLE that while Weinstein made “an awkward pass” at Thurman in the past, the producer denied ever physically assaulting the actress.

“We have pulled a number of images that demonstrate the strong relationship Mr. Weinstein and Ms. Thurman had had over the years and we wish the New York Times would have published them, the spokesperson said in a statement. “Mr. Weinstein acknowledges making an awkward pass 25 years ago at Ms. Thurman in England after misreading her signals, after a flirtatious exchange in Paris, for which he immediately apologized and deeply regrets.

“However, her claims about being physically assaulted are untrue,” the rep continued. “And this is the first time we have heard those details. There was no physical contact during Mr. Weinstein’s awkward pass and Mr. Weinstein is saddened and puzzled as to ‘why’ Ms. Thurman, someone he considers a colleague and a friend, waited 25 years to make these allegations public, noting that he and Ms. Thurman have shared a very close and mutually beneficial working relationship where they have made several very successful film projects together.”

“This is the first time we are hearing that she considered Mr. Weinstein an enemy and the pictures of their history tell a completely different story,” the rep said.

A representative for Thurman told PEOPLE, “The article speaks for itself.” Reps for Tarantino did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

The actress collaborated with Weinstein on seven movies, including her Oscar-nominated role in Pulp Fiction and the Kill Bill series. Late last year, she hinted at misconduct claims in an Instagram post on Thanksgiving Day where she promised she would be speaking further soon.

“I am grateful today, to be alive, for all those I love, and for all those who have the courage to stand up for others,” she wrote on Instagram alongside a picture of herself in Kill Bill. “I said I was angry recently, and I have a few reasons, #metoo, in case you couldn’t tell by the look on my face. I feel it’s important to take your time, be fair, be exact, so… Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! (Except you Harvey, and all your wicked conspirators – I’m glad it’s going slowly – You don’t deserve a bullet) -stay tuned.”

When asked about her thoughts on the sexual harassment allegations against him in October, the star was visibly upset as she declined to speak in that moment.

“I don’t have a tidy soundbite for you, because I have learned — I am not a child and I have learned that… when I’ve spoken in anger, I usually regret the way I express myself,” Thurman told Access Hollywood, carefully choosing her words. “So I’ve been waiting to feel less angry… and when I’m ready, I’ll say what I have to say.”

Weinstein, 65, has been accused of sexual misconduct by over 60 women including Cara Delevingne, Ashley Judd and Gwyneth Paltrow since The New York Times and The New Yorker documented decades of alleged sexual misconduct and sexual assault involving a number of women in detailed articles last fall.

A spokesperson for Weinstein previously told PEOPLE in a statement that “any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”
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