How to Join
the Fashion Spot / the Sidewalk Café / Rumor has it...
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
20-06-2012
  1
front row
 
prosperk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London, Dublin & Paris
Gender: homme
Posts: 259
Joan Juliet Buck - WWD Hachet Job
Did anyone read the WWD article on Joan Juliet Buck by the paper's new Media Editor, published on 18.6.2012?

http://www.wwd.com/media-news/fashio...ment-562009735

Some pundits see it as an in-house spin job, aimed at enabling the editors who ordered JJB to write this puff piece on the Butcher of Syria's arm candy wife to cover their rears in the face of some rather negative reactions from the reading public.

What's grimly funny is that while Maza and his superiors can dish it out in best Murdoch tabloid style, they don't seem to be able to take it, as the deletion of comments indicates. They deleted my comment and seem to have leaned on a couple of bloggers who had picked up on it, perhaps because I included my credentials.

Or perhaps it was the "trade paper" crack.

They're getting some flak over the article so I'll reproduce it here in case the editors pull the piece.

Quote:
NO LONGER IN VOGUE:

Joan Juliet Buck’s profile of Asma al-Assad in the March 2011 Vogue has gotten a lot of attention lately. Again.

Lost in the uproar is the fact that Buck hasn’t been with the magazine where she’s written for nearly 40 years, since December. In February, Vogue stopped listing her as a contributing editor. The writer and the magazine confirmed the end of their professional relationship.

Buck has instead busied herself with other writing assignments and tweeting her newfound awareness of the atrocities in Syria.

Buck, the daughter of a film producer, has had a charmed career in publishing for decades. She’s been at Condé Nast almost as long as Eustace Tilley, flitting from magazine to magazine since 1968, first at Glamour, later at Vanity Fair, and then French Vogue, where she was editor in chief for seven years. Her first byline in American Vogue dates to 1973, on a story titled “London Fast-Talk.” In 2003, she signed a contract as a contributing editor.

Their relationship was highly productive and mutually beneficial. She averaged more or less a piece a month, and extensive ones: 3,000 words on Carolina Herrera one month! 3,000 more on Barbara Walters another! For Vogue, she was a reliable source of friendly, if forgettable copy on tasteful ladies. The Assad profile, however, did not go unnoticed outside the magazine’s regular readers. While the profile had a cursory mention of Syria’s surveillance of its people, it fawns over the first lady, who is described as a “thin, long-limbed beauty.”

The story drew instant condemnation and mockery, coming as it did just as Syria had began a brutal crackdown of a rising dissident movement. Vogue was so unstylishly red-faced over the story that it scrubbed it permanently from its Web site.

Then in December, after nine years on the masthead, Buck’s contract was not renewed. Did Anna Wintour push her out over the bad press? Was Buck overcome with guilt over the profile? A spokeswoman for Vogue said her contract was up. “Simple as that,” she said, exclamation point implied. Buck confirmed her contract had expired, though she declined to elaborate. If she had a relationship with Wintour before the piece, it is no more.

“The last time I saw Anna was at a screening maybe a year ago,” she said.

In The New York Times last week, Wintour said Vogue understood its values were “at odds” with the despotic regime’s only after the publication of the profile. Buck did not clarify if she’d pitched the piece or had been assigned it. But she certainly seemed to become more outspoken about Syria once her Vogue contract expired.

Her Twitter feed used to be typical for the socially aware celebrity intellectual, a mix of exchanges with Tina Brown and Salman Rushdie, running commentary of the Oscars and a couple of references to Occupy Wall Street, just to mix things up.

“NBC has shut down production on my favorite new show of the year, ‘Prime Suspect.’ Ridiculous decision” — was a typical entry.

Then in December, she started bringing up news reports on Syria, and the tenor of her criticism got increasingly strident. In April, she told NPR that it was “horrifying” standing next to the Assads. Now her Twitter feed reads like it’s pipelined into the Reuters wire, with near constant updates on the imminent civil war in Syria. There have been no more complaints about canceled TV shows.

While she’s been broadcasting hew new social awareness, one retweet at a time, she’s also busy with projects this year, like continuing her contributions to "T: The New York Times Style Magazine."

Reached at her home in New York last week, Buck said she didn’t have time to comment on her relationship with Vogue. “I’m on deadline,” she said. Given her new interests, who was she writing for? The Nation? Mother Jones? No, Buck said, the piece was for W.
PK
Attached Images
File Type: jpg JJB WWD Comment 1.jpg (106.1 KB, 46 views)

__________________
Fashion is something barbarous, for it produces innovation without reason and imitation without benefit (George Santayana) - http://prosperkeating.com
  Reply With Quote
 
20-06-2012
  2
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 22,387
This is indeed leaving a very bad taste in my mouth. That article is just a disgrace, and she did not earn it after all those years of doing fantastic articles for Vogue, and other CN titles.

I have always enjoyed her writing, and i hope a talent like hers gets pass this, and from the last bit it sounds she will. Working for W might be even better for her.

  Reply With Quote
20-06-2012
  3
V.I.P.
 
LUXXX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 4,274
I don't get why Vogue was so pissed at Joan, as if she stated some breaking news when she said what qualifies for a woman to appear in Vogue. Thin and pretty, big shocker. Joan was just following the advice of her editor at Vogue.

This whole thing stinks.

  Reply With Quote
20-06-2012
  4
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 22,387
^ It does stink, but you missed the point here, her contract has not been renewed because of the piece, not because of what she said about it. She gave interviews about it only after she was no longer working for Conde Nast (officially), therefore her TV interview didn't get her in trouble.

So it stinks big time, to let go someone of her talent, because she was doing an assigned job, unless she personally campaigned to cover her for the magazine. Which frankly with Wintours reputation i cant see happening.


They just needed someone to take the blame. But this WWD piece is hands down the most nasty article they have done in years, i hope they dont turn into that kind of paper!

  Reply With Quote
20-06-2012
  5
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 11,666
Must be great to have an editor's job where you don't have to take total responsibility for bad decisions, you can just blame an employee for commissioning, approving and running an embarrassing article, and then erase them from your world as an inconvenience.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
  Reply With Quote
20-06-2012
  6
fashion icon
 
YoninahAliza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Avonlea
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,238
This whole situation seems like a blame-game to me. But the first thing I have to wonder is, who even thought it would be a good idea to profile Asma al-Assad? I wonder if Joan Juliet Buck was given the freedom to write about what she wanted too and then she thought Asma would be a good person to profile. Or if Anna told her to interview Asma? Lot's of questions which I wish would be answered truthfully.

And secondly, it was known around this time that Asma's husband was a horrible leader, not to the extent that we now know, but they did know. Of course it's always interesting to read an in-depth article on a controversial figure but when it's about her lifestyle rather then her views it get's a bit iffy. And finally, I really don't like how they handled the situation with Joan, whether or not she was at fault they should have given her a better sendoff rather then practically dumping her to the curb. Plus, they tried to further slander her name which can really hurt someone's reputation, especially a journalist's reputation.

__________________
http://miss-rumphius.tumblr.com/ "It is ever so much easier to be good if your clothes are fashionable." Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  Reply With Quote
20-06-2012
  7
Mr. Zhivago
 
t-rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,640
You can listen to JJB on NPR piece here http://www.npr.org/2012/04/20/151058...ias-first-lady

Quote:
BLOCK: A little more than a year ago, a far more flattering light shone on Asma al-Assad. She was featured in a rare profile in Vogue magazine titled "A Rose in the Desert." It depicted her as a beautiful, wealthy, intelligent woman who cared deeply about her family - and about all children in Syria. Last year's Vogue article was written by Joan Juliet Buck, and she joins me now. Joan, welcome to the program.

JOAN JULIET BUCK: Thank you, Melissa.

BLOCK: Your article was terribly timed. It ended coming out in March of 2011, just as the crackdown in Syria was beginning. And it was roundly criticized as putting a really shiny gloss on a very unsavory regime. Vogue ended up scrubbing the article from its website. What was the intention of this assignment, going in?

BUCK: I think that Vogue is always on the lookout for good-looking first ladies because they're a combination of power and beauty and elegance. That's what Vogue is about. And here was this woman who had never given an interview, who was extremely thin and very well-dressed and therefore, qualified to be in Vogue. And they had - Vogue had been trying to get her for quite a long time.

BLOCK: Let's talk a bit about the impressions you got during your time that you spent with Asma al-Assad. She was born and raised in Britain, was an investment banker in London before she became first lady. What was she like?

BUCK: What's most interesting about the video that the U.N. wives have put out is, the voice on the video is exactly her voice. Asma al-Assad, born in England, university in England, banker in England - she is a very specific type of English woman; intelligent, career-minded, watches her weight. She never ate - that I saw her - and as a banker, completely on message with everything she did.

BLOCK: Do you imagine that this open letter - this video that's been released by the ambassadors' wives, targeting her specifically - do you think she would even have any idea that it exists? And, if she does, would it affect her in any way?

BUCK: I'm sure - she, obviously, surfs the Web. Of course, she's seen it and of course, it's not going to have any effect. One of the most affecting things in the last couple of months is the communications that she got from the young woman from the ruling family in Qatar who said: For the sake of your children, leave now. And she refused to even answer the woman.

You know, they are pretending that nothing is happening there. It's disgusting. Is a little video going to make a difference? No.

BLOCK: When you think now about what has happened in Syria since you've left - 9,000 people killed by this regime.

BUCK: Yes. Yes.

BLOCK: What do you think? And do you regret the story that you ended up writing?

BUCK: I regret that they titled it "A Rose in the Desert."

BLOCK: That was not your title?

BUCK: Of course not. No. There are odd things. The children that I met - there were three children. The little girl had curly hair; the two little boys had blonde hair. The photographer went after me. In the photos that came out in the magazine, you only see two children, and they both have black hair.
I'm sure that if I were the president of Syria, I wouldn't want photos of my real children to appear in a magazine. But everything was like that.

I don't think I should have gone near the Assads. Asma Assad called the ancient culture of the country its hardware. She speaks like a banker with a degree in computer science. She said what interested her were the people. They were the software. The software has been getting killed every day for 13 months by her husband's forces, and they're pretending nothing is happening.

It is horrifying to have been near people like that.

  Reply With Quote
20-06-2012
  8
V.I.P.
 
MulletProof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Gender: femme
Posts: 24,663
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerrouge View Post
Must be great to have an editor's job where you don't have to take total responsibility for bad decisions, you can just blame an employee for commissioning, approving and running an embarrassing article, and then erase them from your world as an inconvenience.
Exactly my thoughts here. It's unbelievable how Condé Nast just lowers its head for American Vogue. They certainly go by logistics and hierarchies and straight to the 'root of the problem' with other magazines (Vogue Paris for example) but can't quite bring themselves to come up with anything other than a scapegoat even though it's pretty obvious who's ventured into sketchy territory guided by a known fascination for all pseudo-social things and British figures.. and screwed it up big time.

__________________
Metal teeth of carousels.
  Reply With Quote
21-06-2012
  9
front row
 
prosperk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London, Dublin & Paris
Gender: homme
Posts: 259
WWD put my comments back up after I emailed their Editor-in-Chief. I know that a number of other people in the business, even those who do not particularly like JJB, got in touch with him about this hit piece, which is indeed what it is. He seemed to be saying that it has been removed because of obscenities. I'm Irish, brought up in London, and I can be as foul-mouthed as the paratrooper I once was, back in prehistory, but can any of you see anything obscene in the comment in question?

JJB's profile was published weeks before Mr Assad embarked on his democidal enterprise. Wintour is an extremely effective chief editor in commercial terms but she is British and her father was the well-respected Editor-in-Chief of the (London) Evening Standard, which used to be a serious newspaper. Her brother is a respected photo-journalist. She has given interviews in which she was asked if she had an inferiority complex as a consequence. No reason why she should. But in the end, everything has been dumbed down drastically in the past couple of decades. When you consider that American and French Vogue were the first to publish Holocaust reportage in 1945, in the form of Lee Miller's reportage, and you look at them now. When I came back from Kosova and Albania in 1999, JJB proposed a supplement containing the photos and the reportage we had as a wake-up jolt to readers. The suits squashed the idea. Mind you, one of the fashion glossies I wrote for got in touch and asked if I thought a fashion shoot in one of the refugee camps in Albania would be possible, as the inmates looked so striking. My reply is unprintable and I never worked for them again.

In the end, JJB's profile of Mrs Assad could also be taken as a chilling insight into the La-La Land occupied by the wives or concubines of murderous dictators and monarchs. The "thin" reference was a none-too-subtle dig on JJB's part, as anyone who knows her style will attest. Where is the criticism of James Nachtwey for his ¡Hola! magazine-style photo portraiture of the Assad family? Like anyone else, particularly in an age where newspapers will publish images from any mouthbreather with a smartphone, photo-journalists like him have to find money somewhere. And if profiling dictators and their happy families means another few grand for the rent, so be it.

The paradox is that if one digs deeper into Fashion's relationship with the Middle East, many of the top fashion houses are kept solvent by the mass purchases of haute couture and accessories by the harems of Saudi and Gulf potentates and those fashion houses keep the glossies going with ad revenue. Saudi is the main financier of Al-Quaeda. China provides the other main source of revenue for Fashion. No comment needed.

PK

__________________
Fashion is something barbarous, for it produces innovation without reason and imitation without benefit (George Santayana) - http://prosperkeating.com

Last edited by prosperk; 21-06-2012 at 02:36 AM.
  Reply With Quote
21-06-2012
  10
V.I.P.
 
Not Plain Jane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Canada
Gender: femme
Posts: 9,999
Quote:
The paradox is that if one digs deeper into Fashion's relationship with the Middle East, many of the top fashion houses are kept solvent by the mass purchases of haute couture and accessories by the harems of Saudi and Gulf potentates and those fashion houses keep the glossies going with ad revenue. Saudi is the main financier of Al-Quaeda. China provides the other main source of revenue for Fashion. No comment needed.
This is a fascinating point that could be addressed more deeply indeed.

Apparently the EU banned Asma al-Assad from her shopping trips to Europe as part of its sanctions against Syria.

Also here are some words from Anna Wintour:

“In 2010, we set up an interview with the Syrian leader’s wife, Asma al-Assad, a Western-educated former banker and a woman with a reputation as a force for reform in the Middle East,” Vogue’s editor, Anna Wintour, wrote.

“Like many at that time, we were hopeful that the Assad regime would be open to a more progressive society. Subsequent to our interview, as the terrible events of the past year and a half unfolded in Syria, it became clear that its priorities and values were completely at odds with those of Vogue.

“The escalating atrocities in Syria are unconscionable, and we deplore the actions of the Assad regime in the strongest possible terms.”

Source: http://www.journalgazette.net/articl...9982/1021/EDIT

__________________
Fashion: Don’t you recognize me? Death: You should know that I don’t see very well and I can’t wear glasses. Fashion: I’m Fashion, your sister. Death: My sister? Fashion: Yes. You and I together keep undoing and changing things down here on earth although you go about it in one way and I another. Giacomo Leopardi, “Dialogue Between Fashion and Death.”abridged
  Reply With Quote
21-06-2012
  11
front row
 
prosperk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London, Dublin & Paris
Gender: homme
Posts: 259
http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=37882

__________________
Fashion is something barbarous, for it produces innovation without reason and imitation without benefit (George Santayana) - http://prosperkeating.com
  Reply With Quote
02-08-2012
  12
Mr. Zhivago
 
t-rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,640
She's written an article for the August 6 issue of Newsweek. She was fired from Vogue, currently writing a memoir. Her article:
http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswee...irst-lady.html

Quote:
Doug Saunders, European bureau chief for The Globe and Mail of Toronto posted to Twitter: “Newsweek gave the author of the infamous Asma-al-Assad Vogue profile about 3,000 words of rope. She used every inch.”

  Reply With Quote
02-08-2012
  13
V.I.P.
 
LUXXX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 4,274
She really bitch-slapped Vogue right back with that piece. Some of those lines are real head-scratchers. Whoever the editor was at Vogue who said that they "didn’t think the Arab Spring was going anywhere" -- Yikes!

  Reply With Quote
02-08-2012
  14
fashion icon
 
ALAUU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,409
I thought this was funny. It's related to her Newsweek article.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...r-hashtag.html

  Reply With Quote
02-08-2012
  15
Rebaptising my badness
 
Nemova's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: On the sunny side of the street
Gender: femme
Posts: 8,278
Quote:
Originally Posted by t-rex View Post
She's written an article for the August 6 issue of Newsweek. She was fired from Vogue, currently writing a memoir. Her article:
http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswee...irst-lady.html
Kudos to JJB for speaking out.

__________________
"Make up your mind/Wake up and fight" W.G. || "I reckon you think you've been redeemed" H.M. || "All music for me is worship of one kind or another" B.
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
buck, hachet, joan, job, juliet, wwd
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:46 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.