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31-03-2012
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Aaron de Mey - Make-up Artist & Artistic Director, Lancome
I have mixed feeling about his creative direction for Lancome and their ad campaigns but have been a long time fan of his make-up artistry.


"WHO: Aaron de Mey, Master in the Making"
Harpers' Bazaar May 2000


ellastica scan



" New Wave "
Harper's Bazaar May 2000
Photographer ~ Craig McDean
Model ~ Gisele Bundchen
Fashion Editor~ Brana Wolf
Make-up ~ Aaron de Mey
Hair ~ Kevin Ryan





ellastica scans

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01-04-2012
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" I get along without you very well "
i-D October 2002
Photographer: Richard Bush
Model: Anne-Catherine Lacroix
Styling: Jane How
Hair: Dejan Cekanovic
Make-up: Aaron de Mey
Source: bwgreyscale




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Such an incredibly talented artist!

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02-04-2012
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Quote:
" A Particular Beauty"

Aaron de Mey's work for Lancôme and the world's best designers and publications has given him a voice unique to the beauty industry.
But it all comes from a deep respect from the past...

Portait: Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin
Text: Daniel Magnussen

Source: intermissionmagazine.com


Daniel Magnussen: I know you grew up in New Zealand and came to New York in 1998, right?

Aaron de Mey: Yes…


DM: When did your obsession with Kurt Cobain begin?


ADM: It came from New Zealand. They have a great music scene there, some good bands that gave me an appreciation of music and performance. It’s quite a small country – very intimate – creatively it’s quite interesting because it’s so diverse. And they have a lot of different influences because you’re so far away from anywhere. New Zealand is really at the bottom of the world. You’re part of the Commonwealth, so there’s quite an English mentality, but there’s also a strong awareness of American and European culture. I guess it came from that period of time when I was a teenager; I really liked both him and Courtney, and I still do. I love people who take things to the limit in whatever they do. Whether it’s music or film… and I definitely think he was one of those… rare people. I’m nostalgic about that time and what Nirvana still represents.


DM: So did Nirvana ever play in New Zealand?

ADM: No. Regrettably, I never saw them live. I wish I had. But he was gone when I left New Zealand. But I know Courtney personally, and she lived up to everything I imagined. I’m sure he was exactly the same.


DM: When you left New Zealand to work in New York, did you start by assisting – or working on your own with an agent?

ADM: It was all very strange for me, because when I first arrived in New York it was fashion week. I had arrived without any expectations and wasn’t intending to work for at least six months. I did come here to pursue a career, but wasn’t planning on working until the following year. This was the first time I’d travelled so far from home, and it was truly about the experience and settling into the city, having a holiday in New York. I had a friend who was modeling. She had a manager, who also worked with Francois Nars. This was back when the Nars make-up line had come into stores and he was still doing shows like Versace, Anna Sui, Marc Jacobs… So, I took my book, which was a scrapbook made out of my 10 favorite pictures, to him, and he really liked it. I didn’t have any show experience, because that did not exist in New Zealand, but had a great time working on Francois’ team. He’s inspiring – a real talent. All of this happened not very long after I arrived in NY, about two weeks or so. Then Francois’ agency called me – he had his own agency back then with 5 make-up artists – and told me they had an i-D cover shoot with Naomi Campbell and Edward Enninful, so if I showed up and did it, his agency would represent me as a make-up artist.


DM: (Laughing) Sounds like a good first job …

ADM: And that’s exactly what happened. So of course I did it. It was only my second or third week in New York and it really threw me in at the deep end. I was with Francois’ agency for that first year…And then everything rolled from there. Meeting Edward was a great thing, I had a great time and he has always been a very supportive person. The same with Naomi. This was how my career in New York started. In a way it was quite nice, because I just had to go with it. It just happened.


DM: And now you’ve worked with most of the great photographers. But do you have one or two you feel you have a more special relationship with – like Mario Sorrenti?

ADM: Yeah, I mean, I love him very much – professionally as well as on a more personal level. I’ve known him for a very long time and he’s a great person and a great photographer. He is someone you can really collaborate with. He has a strong, focused team around him and everyone is treated with respect, and as one of the family… I prefer a more intimate situation like that… and I love photography, because I feel like you’re actually creating something and collaborating as a team. I love Mario very much. I’m very fond of Bruce Weber as well; he is everything I imagined… a real gentleman. I love how he makes everyone look beautiful and attractive – child or adult, man or woman. And the way he makes everything look fantastic… it’s amazing. I admire both Bruce and Mario; they make fashion look believable, even if it’s extreme or super-cosmetic. I love lots of people for different reasons… Terry Richardson is also very chic and his photographs are elegant and fresh. Yeah, some really nice people.


DM: When was the first time you worked with Bruce?

ADM: It was actually pretty early on, because Edward kind of put me with Craig McDean almost immediately after the Naomi shoot. I had an amazing time working with those guys. Afterwards I began working with Steven Klein. Joe McKenna actually saw me in a restaurant and wanted to cast me for a fashion show… I told him I was a make-up artist, but I don’t think he believed me. Joe requested my book anyway and the next week he put me with Steven Klein and soon after, Bruce Weber. So my collaborations with Bruce began about 10 or 12 years ago and I’ve been working with him ever since. Bruce and Joe were always heroes of mine, people I always admired. Their collaborations together are legendary.


DM: I know you did all the Dior Homme shows with Hedi. How did the two of you first meet?


ADM: That was also through Bruce. I had been working with him and he asked me to do a television commercial, for a Dior fragrance. It was Didier Malige and I together, and I loved working with Didier and Bruce, because they’re from the same kind of world. He’s been with him for a very long time. They have a great relationship, and it’s really interesting seeing them work together. Didier and I were working with Bruce that day – that’s when we met Hedi. After that, Hedi requested Didier and I for his campaigns and shows, and we’ve worked with him ever since. It was great to see someone really develop a brand and a house through fashion, design and photography.


DM: So which Dior Homme collection was your favorite?


ADM: I love the collection with the hair inspired by Kurt (Cobain) – maybe in a more glamorous way. All the boys had long hair and they had glitter makeup on every kid but in a different color for everybody depending on who it was… I remember that collection being fantastic. I felt it was really saying something. That was one of my favorites. It’s always great to work with Hedi, because he’s aware of the importance of hair and make-up. It’s another detail that’s very analyzed and thought about, which is interesting, because some people don’t necessarily take notice of it, or aren’t particularly interested, so that makes it fun working with Hedi.

DM: Which menswear designers dominate your own closet?

ADM: At the moment I’m a real sucker for Balmain. I think Christophe was really sharp and I loved what he was doing. I have a lot of Givenchy and Riccardo is very generous with me. I like Ann Demeulemeester, because she’s a legend and her clothes are effortless – ethereal. And I seem to be really attracted to Prada, because I think she does very interesting pieces for men… they don’t look like they’re from a designer. Oh… and Lanvin too, its super-luxurious.


DM: Which photographers would you have loved to work with?

ADM: I wish I could have worked more with Corinne Day, and I miss her. I think she was really fantastic. I would have loved to see more of her; she hadn’t done enough. And I really would have loved to work with Robert Mapplethorpe and Guy Bourdin. Guy Bourdin had such a huge influence on future generations and the photography was so glamorous – and funny.

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" A Particular Beauty" cont...


DM: You’ve worked with Lancôme for the past 4 years now. How did it all begin?

ADM: Initially, I didn’t really know what to expect and I was a little overwhelmed at being part of a big house. I loved working with photographers and designers so I was cautious about moving away from that world even slightly, and I was still interested in pursuing my editorial and fashion work. But that said, working with Hedi (Slimane) and seeing someone like him working within a corporate structure – and making it work – subconsciously inspired me to go for it. I was thrown into it and after working on sitting shoots, it’s a different world and maybe I was slightly naive. Which may actually have been a good thing. I didn’t come with any expectations. I was just trying my hardest to do my best work for Lancôme, and at the same time treating it as an education. Two amazing women, who have acted as mentors and guided me through, took me on board at Lancôme. I was very fortunate.



DM: Besides creating new colors for lipsticks and other products… what do you do at Lancôme?

ADM: I didn’t think I would be doing anything else (laughing) – I imagined that was all you did at a house; you make colors, you make textures, and you forecast trends. You have to forecast trends two years in advance within a house; the reason being it takes that long to create certain products. In the fashion industry it works much faster, and I had to adapt my thought process when I joined Lancôme, and really thoughtfully concentrate on the colors and textures, so that they would be desirable and modern when they finally became available to the public. When I first arrived, I was very motivated to create new colors and textures… not necessarily rebranding, but to really focus the direction of the collections I worked on. To take the best things and simplify them. We worked on packaging and architecture, meeting all the different teams, training and developing the makeup artists and the people that work with them in the stores, selling the collections, conducting interviews with journalists and bloggers to find out what they thought of Lancôme. Afterwards we put all of that information together to develop the best products possible. Now I’m really working on the collections twice yearly – fall/winter and spring/summer, and I love it. But in the beginning it was a lot. It is very interesting and a great education, because it put me with people that I wouldn’t normally be in connection with; scientists, architects, and I love it for that. Making colors and textures, that’s just something I do and it happens when I work within my own world, and then I translate it into the Lancôme world.



DM: Do you also decide on the models and the photographers for Lancôme?

ADM: Yes, that’s a big part of it, but it might also be the easiest part for me, because it’s the last thing you do after working very intensely on a collection. And doing photo shoots is what I do every day and when everything comes together. Besides that, you have publicity and marketing, which initially I found tricky… because I’m not a professional at this and certainly not a public speaker. What I mean is, you are placed in a situation very foreign from your normal daily life… doing interviews with journalists and bloggers who are asking very detailed questions about the collection, why you chose certain colors or packaging, what was the inspiration, what’s modern etc. and it can be daunting. But I really enjoy developing new products and make-up and even though I’m naturally a shy person… I am much more confident and enthusiastic about makeup and beauty products and generally I have found these experiences and dialogues far less scary than I initially imagined. Doing the campaign in the end is definitely the fun and easy part. Of course it’s nice working with Mario Testino on it, because the idea is to bring the brand together, to have someone work with the entire world within Lancôme and unify all the collections. In the past, we had a lot of different photographers shooting campaigns. There is so much to do; skincare, fragrance, mascaras, foundations and my make-up collections, so it’s nice to bring in it all into the same family. I always try to have a stylist and hairdresser whom I love, and I try to push for the girl I want – like Daria (Werbowy) or Elettra (Weidemann). When I first arrived at Lancôme, I really loved the beauty advertising from the early sixties and seventies. Then you saw more of the woman…


DM: And it didn’t feel retouched…

ADM: Yeah, and it wasn’t just a close-up or a tight crop, you saw the entire woman. You saw the fashion, you saw which shoes she was wearing and you saw what car she was driving or elegant home she lived in. A double page spread might have a close-up but the other page had an image that defined the woman and the unique world she represented. I loved that world, so I was really pushing for that when I first arrived at Lancôme. I wanted to make a confident statement for the cosmetic advertising and push it in a new direction. And when Mario did the French Coquettes campaign with me, I tried to push for more than one woman, because I had memories of multiple girls in beauty advertising. Lancôme is a family and they have a lot of different, beautiful women representing them. That’s why I like using two women; Daria and Elettra (Wiedemann) together. It’s fun to be working towards a new direction for beauty advertisements within the Lancôme world.



DM: What do you think has been the biggest challenge for you during these first 4 years with Lancôme?


ADM: Things take longer than expected and there are so many people involved in the whole process. I’m normally directly involved with the person I’m creating with. But from the beginning at Lancôme, I was also told to make it strong and push it in other directions. It’s only natural that things will become diluted or elements and aspects are changed into something else, for whatever reason, whether it’s FDA approval or the approval for different countries – there are all kinds of restrictions.



DM: And obviously you’re doing certain products only for certain markets?


ADM: Absolutely. I’m very influenced and inspired by technology, Japanese, Asian technologies in particular. I work with a lot of their scientists and beauty teams, and they were the first people I met when I came to Lancôme. I’m inspired by their technologies and techniques and beauty gestures. It’s a very different way of wearing make-up and it’s very sophisticated. For instance they are allowed specific products and super-shiny textures, super-high grade metallics that you can’t even get in America. It’s tough when you find these crazy, amazing pigments or new technologies, or new packaging, and then they’re restricted because they can’t enter a particular country. But for Lancôme, you have to produce a huge number of units to be able to support all these markets, and in some places you can only make a small number of very specific products. In a way, restrictions help create newness – I believe that in all aspects. I think when gates are shut and doors are closed it makes way for new things. You find a better or another way.



DM: How many days a year do you think you’re actually working with Lancôme?


ADM: I have a certain amount of days that I need to work with them. My schedule is made so I basically work every day, because I don’t want to stop working editorially, with photographers, or during shows, but I also love being with Lancôme, so I have a lot of homework. The first year it was meant to be 20 days and I did 40… I spend a lot of my free time working on projects for Lancôme. There is a lot of homework and I like doing research. When I’m thinking about my own work, I’m always thinking about this too. They are two very different worlds and I need to challenge what I believe is right for them. It’s not necessarily my personal taste every time or something I would do in other situations. That’s what makes it interesting. I’m better when I work all the time, rather than stopping and starting.



DM: Any new products coming out from Lancôme in the near future you can tell us about?

ADM: I just finished my latest collection that we shot with Mario in Barcelona, just before the holidays. It was a red and black story; I wanted to take everything back to the heritage of Lancôme, the very beginning. So it’s really inspired by their original house, and an homage to Lancôme from past decades. The focus is on red for the lips, because that was the first lipstick they ever created. I love how when beauty houses first started, they worked with fantastic jewelers to create their lipstick cases – these objects were unique and very beautiful, and people used to cherish them. They were something a woman really wanted to keep. It was this idea that I was inspired by. I’ve been working the last few seasons on developing a new style of packaging for lipstick, to make it smaller in scale and more nomadic – made out of metal, using the same scale when redesigning the exterior for each collection. The focus was on red and black; very pure and simple and universally elegant, and appealing to a wide audience.


source: intermissionmagazine.com

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" A Particular Beauty" cont...


Aaron de Mey photograhed by Inez & Vinoodh.


DM: On photography, is the most important picture for you one where the make-up stands out and becomes memorable?

ADM: One that always stays with me is a picture I did with Rei Kawakubo, after my very first Comme des Garcons show. It was in 2000, and it was her first punk collection, with black leather with silver chains. It was totally punk. She sometimes used models for her advertising with the same hair and make-up look from the show, and the Japanese photographer wanted a very beautiful, stark portrait of the girls, and basically we did the same hair and makeup as Julien d’Ys and I had done for the show. That for me holds a really great memory. There are so many images that I love, not necessarily for the make-up or the beauty but for the picture itself. I really go for the photograph first, and it would probably be a Mario Sorrenti or Bruce Weber portrait, or even a fashion image by Terry Richardson or David Sims or Inez & Vinoodh. It’s hard to select one image because every photographer and the teams they work with have their own distinct styles, and I have fond memories when I see pictures that I have worked on with so many different and talented people.



DM: Do you keep prints of any of these at your apartment?


ADM: No, but I have a portrait of Kurt Cobain by Jesse Frohman and a picture by Mick Rock out of Blondie. And those are the only two that made it into my apartment. I love what I’ve done, but I would never display it. I prefer other people’s work.



DM: Which other make-up artists do you admire?


ADM: Linda Mason, I think, is amazing. I love how she took it to the limit, and dropped everything and went into her own world. I really admire people like that. I love how she has her make-up store, and writes books, and does her artwork. Serge Lutens is a real hero of mine. I liked that he created a whole new communication of beauty through art directing, photographing and doing the make-up himself. That was a very new way of thinking. His photographs are provocative and daring and can also be quite naturalistic.



DM: Do you have other passions than your work? Do you surf?


ADM: I surfed when I was a kid and windsurfed and sailed, but my passions today are things that revolve around work. I like things that lead into my life; I like film, I like music and reading a lot, I’m obsessed with furniture and interiors. I like placing something stark against something more luxurious and antique – to take objects to their limit.



DM: You work for all the best magazines – which are your own favorites?


ADM: French Vogue. I think both Carine and Emmanuelle have done such an amazing job. I think it looks so fresh, chic, sexy and interesting, exactly the way Vogue should look. It’s everything you imagine Vogue to be. I also like a lot of music magazines and World of Interiors magazine. I love Casa Vogue and Italian Vogue of course. Love magazine is a great new magazine and V magazine has been very strong for an American publication, for some time now. I think Fabien Baron is doing a really great job at Interview. Fabien is another one of those people who’s multitalented but very funny and kind, and it’s amazing how someone can see so far ahead with so many different projects and worlds going on at the same time. He’s a big inspiration.



DM: Do you ever go back to New Zealand?


ADM: It’s tricky for me. I haven’t traveled there very regularly for a long time because it is so far away. And when I get a vacation I want to go somewhere I’ve never been, because before I left New Zealand I hadn’t traveled much, besides places like Australia and Tahiti. I had a wonderful time in New Zealand with my family and friends last December… which is summer down there. So Christmas is a day spent at the beach or in the garden or poolside.



DM: Which women today do you think have the best make-up look and style
?

ADM: Carine Roitfeld. I think she’s got a good style – and make-up look (laughing). I like her because she does it all; hair, makeup – and sticks with it. I also love Emmanuelle Alt’s style because it’s realistic and effortlessly chic…. I think it’s probably how every woman wants to dress, because it’s sexy and cool at the same time, and a little bit undone. I’m probably mostly drawn to French women’s style. It’s that Kate Moss kind of uniqueness. Kate has exceptional taste but she’s not trendy…very classic and modern all at the same time. Melanie Ward has a great, authentic look, with her beautiful long hair and she combines designer and street clothes so well. The French and English girls really find their look and stay true to themselves and they wear makeup well too… when they want to… in a surprising way sometimes.


DM: So which French women came to mind when you began at Lancôme?

ADM: All of them. And that’s what I used as my influence when I joined Lancôme. From the first job there, I wanted to reinforce that French understated confidence, and this character would be inspirational for the next 10 years into the future of Lancôme. And I wanted to make it very French, because it is a French house. Simone de Beauvoir, Madame Curie, Brigitte Bardot, Romy Schneider, Juliette Binoche, Emmanuelle Alt, Carine Roitfeld, Princesses Caroline and Stephanie of Monaco…(almost French). I try to use all these French iconic women and examine their lives and what they had to say to the world… I think about the ideas behind the faces, and little stories. That’s what I use as my starting point. Lancôme really celebrates women, and I think that’s what make- up is about, to magnify beauty or exaggerate it – give a woman the tools, make it playful and fun, chic, and indulge people. So all these iconic women are always on my mind, and inspire everything I do…



Malgosia Bela photographed by Bruce Weber.
Makeup by Aaron de Mey.


source: intermissionmagazine.com

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04-04-2012
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Vogue Paris April 2012
"Alber Elbaz: l'homme qui aime les femmes"
Models: Alber Elbaz & Katryn Kruger
Photographer: Mario Sorrenti
Stylist: Emmanuelle Alt
Hair: Recine
Makeup: Aaron de Mey



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05-04-2012
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we can always count on you to keep us up-to-date. thanks bb

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WALLFLOWER
W SEPTEMBER 2007
PHOTOGRAPHER: MARIO SORRENTI
MODEL: ALI MICHAEL
HAIR: RECINE
MAKE-UP: AARON DE MEY
STYLIST: CAMILLA NICKERSON
SOURCE: Faith_Akiyama scans






Posted by Fiercification

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^^You're welcome.

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" Cool Britannia "
Harpers Bazaar April 2006
Photographer: Mario Sorrenti
Model: Lily Donaldson
Fashion Editor: Melanie Ward
Hair: Recine
Make-up: Aaron de Mey
Source: ilovelilydonaldson.com



Posted by ellastica

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'BEAUTÉ: LUMIÈRE TAMISÉE'
VOGUE Paris September 2003
Photographer: Mario Sorrenti
Fashion Editor: Anastasia Barbieri
Fashion Assistant: Kasia Pysiak
Model: Hana Soukupova
Hair: Recine
Make-up: Aaron de Mey


Mojopin scans

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TWIST'N TWEED
VOGUE Paris September 2004
Photographer:Mario Sorrenti
Model: Gisele Bündchen
Styling: Marie-Amélie Sauvé
Hair: Recine
Make-up: Aaron de Mey
Source: Vogue Girl @ bellazon


Posted by ckgirlbr

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" the most private star "
US VOGUE October 2006
Photographer: Patrick Demarchelier
Sittings Editor: Tabitha Simmons
Model: Charlotte Gainsbourg
Make-up: Aaron de Mey
Hair: Recine

mps.n06.jpg
ellastica scan

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" Classics "
Harper's Bazaar December 2001
Photographer: Nathaniel Goldberg
Model: Trish Goff
Stylist: Brana Wolf
Hair: James Brown
Make-up: Aaron de Mey
Source: bwgreyscale.com/archive.org



Posted by burbuja8910

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