How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Visualizing Fashion / Behind the Lens
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
13-05-2007
  1
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
Angelica Cheung - Editor-in-Chief, Vogue China
She is Angelica Cheung, editor of VOGUE China!



[style]

[interview from herald tribune]

Angelica Cheung is editorial director of Vogue China, which was launched in September. Cheung, 38, was previously editorial director of Elle China. She grew up in Beijing and, after earning a degree in law and English language and literature, worked for a variety of newspapers and magazines in Hong Kong. Feted in Milan and courted in Paris, Cheung is considered a key tastemaker in the luxury industry's most promising market. She talked with Sarah Raper Larenaudie about the evolution of fashion among Chinese consumers for the International Herald Tribune.

You were previously the editor of Elle China, which was the first international fashion magazine to launch in mainland China in 1988. What was your strategy for Vogue?

- With Vogue, the problem is that its positioning is very high. The ultimate fashion bible. And then you have China, a market which is not that sophisticated. In Shanghai and Beijing, there are groups of people who are into a more stylish lifestyle. Then, there were people who were subscribing to overseas Vogue already. But that's not enough people to support a magazine.

So what convinced Condé Nast to go forward?


- China is becoming more and more sophisticated. The most important thing is that today in China you feel the will to be more fashionable, and the desire to live a better life is very strong. And with the new money, they have the means of doing it. But these people need guidance.

How many readers are you talking about?


- We're at 300,000 copies at the moment and most of our distribution is on newsstands. Our first issue in September sold out in five days. Then we had a second print run and it sold out in three days. We are distributed in the eight major cities.

How does that compare with the other fashion magazines?


- I think after 16 years Elle is selling 400,000 plus, likewise with Cosmopolitan. There are also many local fashion magazines. I have to stress that in China the numbers are not audited.

So how is China Vogue different than other Vogues?


- We add an educational element. Military looks are a big trend now and there is a story in the September issue. For Italian Vogue or American Vogue it would be enough to just run the fashion pictures because the women are sophisticated enough to get the idea. But the Chinese women are not there yet, so we have to tell them more about the inspirations. We did a page on military dressing in movies. And a page telling them how this trend has evolved over several years. There is a page on how to wear it, showing you can add a touch of military. And finally for the people who really can't get it still, we recommend two outfits.

So if you say these are the must-have items, thousands of Chinese are running to the stores to buy them?


- In our October issue, we did a supplement on shoes with a page for each brand showing the best shoes. A lot of the brands have told us that customers are coming to the store with the pages. I wasn't surprised. Chinese readers want to be told what to buy.

Companies trying to enter the Chinese market must be coming to you for advice too.


- I'm quite impressed by people's interest in China. For the Chinese it's a wonderful opportunity. But my advice to foreign companies is to go and see for themselves. You really can't assume. A lot of brands are trying to do things through agencies and that's risky and difficult.

And how do their perceptions change after such a visit?


- They get a feel for the cities; what's good and also what's not quite there. I can't tell you how many brands have told me how they want to do something like their shop in France. A charming street, a charming shop. They say, "I don't want shopping malls." Well it's all very romantic sounding, but I tell them: "You are not going to sell a thing because it's not what the Chinese do."

Are there stories in American Vogue or French Vogue that you cannot run because you are in a Communist country where censorship is practiced?


- Really, the only thing is nudity. There are rules, but then some pictures are O.K. and you see them in other magazines. Honestly, though, it's not my taste.

What other stories are you excited about?


- In November we will have a cover sporting a very soft, romantic, elegant Russian look. We grew up in China in the era where the Russians were our best friends - you know the two biggest Socialist countries - and we share a bit of history. And also when I was a kid, we watched so many Russian movies. Ahhhh, really great movies.

Do you feel a responsibility to promote local designers in China?


- Definitely. In the first issue we picked four young fashion designers that we think are the most promising. I like something modern with a Chinese touch but I don't want to see cheongsam, long robes or any of these clichés. The last thing Chinese want is to look like their grandmothers.

I heard that the concept of vintage and retro is difficult in China since young consumers can't say, "Oh it reminds me of what my mother wore," because all the mothers were in Mao suits.


- Explaining retro '70s, '30s, '40s or whatever gives me a chance to tell my readers a lot of the cultural history. Now the '60s is an influence so I have a chance to talk about Swinging London, the Beatles, Shrimpton and why the '60s were such an important era for creativity. Because in China this is the worst period in history with the Cultural Revolution, and creativity was really suppressed. It gives them a clearer idea of how the world evolved.

And it allows you to do that in a nonpolitical, nonthreatening way?


- Actually I didn't think that way. But it's never about politics. It's always about culture and art.
______________________

__________________


Last edited by sethii; 13-05-2007 at 09:10 AM.
  Reply With Quote
 
13-05-2007
  2
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
By HOWARD W. FRENCH (NY times)
Published: October 3, 2005


SHANGHAI, Oct. 2 - From behind her big desk on the top floor of a sleek new office tower in the Xintiandi district, Angelica Cheung, the guiding hand behind this country’s new edition of Vogue magazine, contemplated a very Chinese dilemma.


Vogue has advertised heavily in China’s Xintiandi district. One of the magazine’s goals is to teach readers how to shop and dress, said Angelica Cheung, editorial director of Vogue’s Chinese edition.


“Just a few years ago, China definitely wasn’t ready and didn’t have consumers at the level of Vogue,” said Ms. Cheung, the magazine’s editorial director, as smoothly spoken as she was elegant in a black-and-white pattern Max Mara blouse and skirt. “Two years from now, though, would have definitely been too late. That’s the way China is, moving incredibly fast.”


Fittingly for one of the world’s premier fashion magazines, Ms. Cheung’s offices are in a neighborhood whose name means “new heaven and earth,” a roughly three-square-block area that contains some of Shanghai’s most stylish real estate. By day or by night, Xintiandi is a stalking ground for young movers and shakers.


All over the neighborhood, at bus stops and newsstands, huge reproductions of the magazine’s second cover, featuring the leggy Brazilian model Giselle Bundchen wearing a fur-lined coat, beg for attention. The chances are good that the slick crowd here can relate to a Western model and the high-end fashions she is selling. But Vogue’s $8.6 million wager is by necessity about much more than winning over a postage-stamp-size portion of China, and it is not clear how many of the hundreds of millions of Chinese women are willing or able to join the Vogue bandwagon.


Vogue is not alone in its gamble, and in fact the race to create lucrative fashion and lifestyle magazine franchises based on successful Western publications has never been more crowded, with Elle, Cosmopolitan, Harper’s Bazaar and Marie Claire already bulging from vendors’ racks.


On the men’s side of the newsstand, grinning models baring rippling midriffs peer out from the cover of the Chinese edition of Men’s Health magazine, first published two years ago. Last May, the competition for the male fitness and lifestyle market was joined by FHM magazine, and there are persistent industry rumors here that two other foreign publications, Maxim and InStyle, will be introduced soon.


“How to pick the right tools and the right girls,” was how the editors of FHM described their magazine, which puts scantily clad women on its covers and features purportedly candid talk about sex and relationships from single women. “We court the metrosexual,” said Jun Jin, the editor. “That’s our reader target, 22 to 45, with high education and high salary. They are crazy about new technology, and they like dating pretty girls.”


By reputation, China is all but closed to foreign news media. After years of involvement with the country, Rupert Murdoch said recently that his efforts to expand in China had “hit a brick wall,” adding that Beijing was “quite paranoid about what gets through.” In August, China’s government announced a tightening of controls on foreign media, saying this was necessary to “safeguard national culture.”


But for now, it seems that Chinese authorities have decided that the fashion magazines, which promote whiter skin - a popular theme - Western styles and an obsession with brands, and the men’s magazines - which promote toned bodies and carry lifestyle and sex advice that would not be out of place on a newsstand in New York - are safe.


Indeed, technically at least, Vogue’s Chinese partner is the country’s State Council, in whose name edicts like the one concerning foreign media are issued. All foreign publications in China are required to have a local partner, which by law must retain at least 51 percent ownership. In Vogue’s case, the partner is the State Council-owned publication China Pictorial, a dowdy photo monthly that dates from the country’s revolutionary days and whose title is still written in Mao Zedong’s red-inked calligraphy.


For all of the state’s pretensions of protecting Chinese minds and preserving Chinese ways, the editors at many of the new foreign magazines could not be clearer about their goal of ushering in cultural change, and thereby molding more consumers of high-end foreign goods.


“You inspire the girl to believe if I take care of myself, if I buy the right things, and I educate myself, tomorrow will be better,” Ms. Cheung said.


Education is a word that crops up in her speech time and again. Given that China was all but closed to Western fashions less than a generation ago, Vogue’s mission in China, much more so than in other countries, unabashedly involves teaching readers how to shop and how to dress. “You get the readers familiar with the designers, you show them what works, and sometimes you actually tell them what to buy,” Ms. Cheung added. “It can’t get more basic than that.”

__________________

  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  3
flaunt the imperfection
 
softgrey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: downtown...
Gender: femme
Posts: 50,673
cool- i love her first outfit...!

__________________
"It is not money that makes you well dressed: it is understanding."
ChristianDior



  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  4
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
Quote:
Originally Posted by softgrey
cool- i love her first outfit...!
sorry forgot the caption for that!

"Angelica Cheung, the charismatic Vogue China editor, said, "Most often I wear black." At the Alexander McQueen show, she mixes a Chanel jacket with a Calvin Klein skirt. Her shoes are Roger Vivier, and her bag is Christian Dior."
[style]

At work:

According to Ms Cheung at Vogue, "Many white-collar workers in China's cities want to impress people and raise their social status.


"There are many young girls who save up 2-3 months' salary to spend on a Louis Vuitton handbag. They may work as secretaries, but having the bag gives the impression that they come from a wealthy family or have a rich boyfriend, and in both cases, it attracts a lot of envy from their girlfriends."
[bbc]


__________________

  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  5
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
Asia's fashion capital shapes the look of China ( 01/11/2005 )



Vogue China editor Angelica Cheung says Hong Kong can launch mainland designers onto the world fashion stage

Hong Kong's status as the fashion capital of Asia provided a ladder of opportunity for Angelica Cheung, editorial director of Vogue China. The lifestyle magazine was launched recently in China and over 300,000 copies were sold in the first 14 days.牋 After starting her journalism career in Hong Kong 1992, Ms Cheung had within a decade secured one of the top jobs in the world of fashion publishing. She attributes this rapid rise to Hong Kong's can-do spirit.

"The Hong Kong work environment and the opportunities I was able to follow are the main reasons for where I am today," said Ms Cheung, who moved to Hong Kong after graduating from Beijing University with a degree in law and English. "Hong Kong is such a pragmatic place where ability and enthusiasm are admired and encouraged, and the will to succeed is only limited by your own ambition." Ms Cheung, boosted by the Hong Kong work ethic, went on to study for her MBA in Hong Kong.

Starting on the bottom rung, Ms Cheung's first job in journalism was as editorial assistant at the English language Eastern Express before becoming a feature writer. She later moved to the Hong Kong Standard as the magazine's features editor, joined fashion magazine B International as editor, and became editor of the Chinese language version of Elle before joining Vogue, prior to its mainland launch.

Although based in Shanghai these days, Ms Cheung often travels to Milan, Paris, London and New York to attend fashion shows. She also spends a lot of time in Hong Kong, where Vogue China went on sale in October. Vogue has also recently set up its regional head office in Hong Kong, manned by regional director James Woolhouse.

Hub for luxury brands
�鼱 The inaugural issue of Vogue China which sold over 300,000 copies in 14 days �鼱

"As the fashion capital of Asia, Hong Kong is where many of the leading fashion brands have their regional headquarters and make decisions relating to advertising and promotions," Ms Cheung said. "Hong Kong is also an important location for high quality fashion shoots because of photographers, set designers and stylists' international outlook and detailed knowledge of the fashion industry." Hong Kong fashion designers and movie stars also play an important role in shaping the mainland and regional fashion industry, she said.

"Compared to Hong Kong female fashion sophistication and the ability to make personal interpretations of fashion trends, mainland females are not quite at the same stage yet so inspiration is very important," she said. Hong Kong and other international fashion centres help young mainland women find an entry point and discover their own fashion feel-good.

Hong Kong journalists also form a key part of Ms Cheung's Vogue editorial team. "The experience and knowledge Hong Kong's fashion journalists bring to the team complements the concept of fashion, culture and art we are trying to promote to our readers," she said.

Ms Cheung sees Hong Kong playing a key role in the development of the mainland fashion industry through helping young mainland designers reach a global audience. "Hong Kong's business ability to market and promote new ideas and products is well developed, and this could be key to mainland designers gaining recognition and making their mark on the fashion world," she added.

[hktrader]

__________________

  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  6
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788


[ionly.com.cn]

__________________

  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  7
backstage pass
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Gender: homme
Posts: 681
looks like angelica has her own anna wintour "bob"

  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  8
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
Her cut is slightly assymetrical though? longer on the right side?

__________________

  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  9
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
Says Angelica Cheung:



"It is not a new thing to publish a fashion magazine but our approach and positioning are very different. We're the magazine that only talks about fashion. For other fashion magazines, one third of contents are general features talking about how to handle your career and office politics, and how to handle your sex life. Vogue teaches people more about style, art, sophistication and better living."


"Each country's Vogue is different. There's no one formula to say what is the right way to do Vogue. Italian Vogue is totally pictures, French Vogue is chic and moody, British Vogue is very commercial. China's Vogue is for Chinese readers."


Source: China Daily

__________________

  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  10
the crying of humanity
 
seanutbutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: West Coast U.S.A.
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,337
She sounds quite intelligent. I especially like the last quote of hers you posted ("Each country's Vogue is different").

__________________
  Reply With Quote
08-06-2007
  11
backstage pass
 
rangerrick14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: arkansas
Gender: homme
Posts: 641
I lover her bob so much chicer than Annas.

  Reply With Quote
08-06-2007
  12
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
^ I agree

Does anyone have more pictures? Or can tell me her chinese name?

__________________

  Reply With Quote
10-06-2007
  13
front row
 
vetements's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: tokyo
Gender: homme
Posts: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by sethii View Post
^ I agree

Does anyone have more pictures? Or can tell me her chinese name?

Angelica Cheung or 张宁 (Zhang Ning), Zhang is the family name while Ning is the first name.:p

  Reply With Quote
10-06-2007
  14
V.I.P.
 
sethii's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 19,788
thanks...it seems a famous badminton player has the same name

well, maybe we will see more during fashion weeks this season.

__________________

  Reply With Quote
10-06-2007
  15
V.I.P.
 
kissmesweet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Hong Kong/UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 18,939
She looks like a fun, fashionable person. I like the clothes she wears and the models she uses (don't know if she chooses it or not).

Plus I love the fashionable direction she's taking China to.

__________________
don't you forget about me.
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
angélica, cheung, china, editorinchief, vogue
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:21 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.