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04-12-2007
  16
flaunt the imperfection
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acid View Post
something big is about to happen.
i dont know exactly what is is but the cards are being played
hmmm...sounds juicy!!....

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09-12-2007
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Katie is in NY
she came to shoot POP magazine with Peter Lindbergh. This will be a great story I am sure !!!!

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18-12-2007
  18
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source | fwd

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10 Chic Citizens that Changed 2007: #5 Katie Grand

Why her: The editor-in-chief of Pop magazine, Harper’s Bazaar contributor, and consultant and stylist for the likes of Prada, Miu Miu, Giles, Proenza Schouler, Luella Bartley, and Louis Vuitton has had a whirlwind year that’s flung her into fashion’s forefront. She was named creative director of Mulberry in August, set to replace Stuart Vevers who’s leaving to helm Loewe–and she turned down the position before even starting the job. In addition, Grand was tapped as curator of a Product (RED) project for Gap in Europe, in honor of World AIDS Day. She’s also BFF with a veritable who’s who on the British fashion circuit: Agyness, Giles, Luella

Our favorite moments:
Every time she wears those Mickey Mouse ears. We’re also obsessed with her Gap pieces–Grand worked with the likes of Proenza Schouler, Giles, Pierre Hardy, Henry Holland, Charlotte Tilbury, Calvin Klein, Stephen Jones, and Mulberry to create a collection of super stylish, wearable, and coveted pieces that we’ve been begging friends across the Atlantic to snag up for us.

What’s next:
Although Grand turned down creative directorship of Mulberry, she will be staying on as a creative consultant for the brand. Also, stay tuned for more of her styling prowess to show up on catwalks this February!

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07-02-2008
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from hint fashion magazine
Quote:
She helms the British style ship known simply as Pop magazine—among styling for oodles of other titles and consulting for the Prada, Miu Miu and Louis Vuitton shows each season—but Katie Grand keeps her feet planted firmly on the ground. Unaffected and easy-going, she sits down (on the floor, no less) with MURRAY HEALY and opens up about the things that drive her, from silly English soaps to a serious aversion to anything "wanky."

Interviewing someone is weird enough at the best of times—firing questions at a famous stranger with the kind of abandon usually only enjoyed by cops or psychoanalysts—but when that someone isn't a stranger at all, it feels even weirder, as I'm about to find out. I've been working with Katie Grand on Pop, her twice-yearly fashion magazine, for the past four years, but now my task is to interview her. Off the top of my head, there are all sorts of office trivia I could write about, such as her catch phrases—things she likes are "fun," "jolly" and "marvellous," while things she doesn't like are "dreary." She enjoys a long swim every morning. She's just had the walls of her North London home decorated with William Morris wallpaper. She's discovered the world's greatest moth-buster, which helps keep away unwanted visitors from her vast collection of vintage designer clothes, pieces from which she often wears to the office—an early Westwood jacket with embroidered lapels, say, or a billowing black 80's Comme dress, or a smart Chanel suit jacket with faded jeans. But to get the kind of information one would expect from an interview—where she was born, why she loves fashion so much and how she became (in the words of The Daily Telegraph, a terribly respectable British newspaper not given to hyperbole) "one of the most powerful stylists in the world"—requires a tête-à-tête.

Finding time to sit down with Katie isn't easy. Ironically, after spending the last six weeks chained to our desks finishing off the latest issue of Pop, she's now impossible to pin down, endlessly zipping between jobs and capital cities. Eventually she finds a gap between helping to prepare Giles Deacon's show for London Fashion Week and styling the cover of Arena Homme +, so we sit cross-legged on the floor of the empty office where The Face (RIP) used to be based. She's always brimming with energy and ideas, and this almost child-like alertness and curiosity shows on her face. I begin firing off questions which make her laugh at first, because they're not the kind of things one asks a friend.

Katie was born in Leeds, which I didn't know, and grew up in Birmingham—which I did, because when I first knew her she would occasionally slip into the local accent for comic effect—where she discovered fashion at the age of twelve. "I was really nerdy. And then, kind of overnight, I can clearly remember thinking, 'I just want to be cool.' Around that time, my dad's girlfriend moved up from London and I thought she was terribly chic. She always used to wear Warehouse, which had just opened and was really good, because Jeff Banks was still in charge. So there are photos of me aged twelve wearing waist-high tight red jeans with a puffed-sleeved blue sweater and awful hair, and then aged thirteen in an ankle-length black gathered skirt, white shirt tucked in, braces (suspenders), a black tie, black lace tights, navy blue stilettos and a black beret with a veil. So it was quite quick! And I really got into going to London and going to the Great Gear Market and all that kind of thing."

Academically she was a bright spark, excelling at math, history and English—but not at art, which was unfortunate, because "around fifteen I decided that I wanted to do something in art or fashion." So while studying for her O-levels (exams) she took night classes at the local college to get her design skills up to speed: "sculpture, life drawing, jewellery making, even pottery, because I really wasn't very good." It was only during her foundation course at Birmingham's Bournville College of Art that her design skills blossomed. "I was student of the year and got 96 percent!" So getting into St Martins, London's formidably prestigious design school, didn't prove a major hurdle, although once there she found it hard to settle on a single subject on her degree course. "I tried design, marketing, journalism, knitwear�and ended up doing print, which I still find weird."

It was while she was studying there that she became involved with the recently launched style mag Dazed & Confused, after getting drunk with co-founder Rankin at the opening night of his exhibition Hello Sexy And Welcome in 1993. She helped assemble issue two (as in physically putting the pages together and folding them), and by issue three she had already overturned the magazine's no-fashion policy and started styling shoots.
She remained at Dazed for the remainder of the 90s, where her work was essential in establishing the magazine's fashion credentials. "Brilliant" is how she remembers those days. "Whatever you wanted to do, you just did it. No one could tell you what to do—although you had to argue for what you believed in." But a potent combination of self-consciously talented and artistically ambitious staff, creative freedom and monthly deadlines rarely made for a harmonious working atmosphere. "I ended up going out with Rankin, which was kind of a nightmare, and after we split up it was really difficult working together because we're both quite bullish. And I never had much of a relationship with Jefferson (Hack, the editor). But working with those two was hilarious—every other day would be a screaming row, with stuff being thrown round the office—really juvenile. It wasn't entirely different from being at St Martins, in fact."

It didn't help when Katie started styling shoots for The Face, the style title for whose throne Dazed appeared to be vying—even promoting itself as The Face Of The Nineties—and its biannual menswear stablemate Arena Homme +. When the owners of The Face and Homme + sold them to the publishing conglomerate Emap, Katie was invited to take on an official position within the new set-up, becoming fashion director of The Face and editor-in-chief of an as-yet unnamed new title. "The new directors were looking at launching a twice-yearly version of The Face in the same way that Homme + had sprung from Arena." She put off the painful job of breaking the news of her new job to the Dazed team until moments before her first Face cover shoot—a portait of the model Guinevere looking hoity-toity in a leather collar and a holding white cat—hit the newsstands in August 1999. "Well, it was a really, really hard thing to do."

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The new title that Katie, now 33, was brought in to oversee as editor in chief became Pop, launched a year later. "I don't think Emap really knew what it was going to be. I'm not sure that I did either. I just wanted it to be really jolly. And pink—I was obsessed with it being pink. Which I think it kind of is." The very pink fold-out cover famously featured various friends of Katie's, designers Stella McCartney, Phoebe Philo, Luella Bartley and model Liberty Ross among them, poledancing in a dodgy-looking nightspot. "Yes, I suppose the first one was very clique-y. But it's definitely very jolly. I remember when it came back from the printers, I thought it was the best thing ever."

The closest that first issue came to celebrity was a small article featuring Tony Hart, the retired presenter of a kids' art series on TV in the Seventies. It's a very different situation now, nine issues later, with Madonna, Kylie, Liz Hurley, Demi Moore, Beyoncé, Victoria Beckham and Christina Ricci all having appeared on the cover, and the British press crediting the magazine's front page with the power to revive high-profile careers. "I don't think it was until issue four, the one with Madonna on the cover, that we really worked out what the magazine was about. But now I get nervous when it comes back from the printers, because so much expectation has built up about it. Everyone's got their 'Ooh, it's not as good as issue six' or whatever."

If the magazine's profile has increased, so has Katie's. Successfully restyling such universally recognizable faces has led the British press to dub her "the maverick princess of cool." A year ago, the London Evening Standard even claimed that "What Katie does—and Katie says—is as influential as it gets," which might have sounded like overstatement. However, it was borne out in August of this year, when an off-the-cuff remark in an interview in the US made front-page news back in London. "That was very weird. It all started when someone rang up from New York Magazine and said, 'What were you feeling for next season?' And as they'd been interviewing lots of proper magazine editors who were probably talking about, I don't know, leopard print or short skirts or a longer length, I thought it'd be funny to say Sixties Coronation Street [a British soap that's been running for 40-odd years]. Which was kind of true, actually, because I'd been watching old clips of Elsie Tanner [principal character from the original cast and man-eater to boot] on TV that weekend." It quickly grew into an obsession. In fact, Katie rallied her assistants to scour the Internet for tapes of Sixties Corrie featuring Elsie.

A New York correspondent for a British daily read the piece and 'Elsie Tanner chic' quickly became big news in Britain. "I was very surprised how that blew up. It was obviously a very slow news week." Nevertheless, there's a small piece explaining Elsie Tanner's relevance to the immediate future of fashion in the latest issue of Pop.

There's one question in particular—"What happens on a fashion shoot?"—which sends Katie into a fit of snickering, probably because it's such a dumb question. Of course, I know what happens on a fundamental level, but I'm interested in how she does it. I suppose I want to know about the magic—why one shot in a story just works when another similar one doesn't. Although I don't actually use the word 'magic,' of course, as she hates anything carrying so much as a whiff of pretension (she won't even watch films with English subtitles).

"Well," she starts, hesitantly, concerned about saying anything that might sound "wanky," as she puts it, "lots of stylists work from the clothes, and then have an idea about the shoot. Whereas I think of a reference—photography, art�"

Or Elsie Tanner?


"Yes! Or Miss Marple! [The septuagenarian sleuth's dress sense was an influence Katie brought to the putting together of Miu Miu's autumn/winter 2004 collection.] Yeah, I'd probably start with a character, and then work out what the clothes are." Katie's assistant will call in the clothes, from which she'll make her selection, adding some of her own vintage items from home. "And then you turn up at the studio, your assistant turns up with all the trunks, and you sit around and drink tea for about five hours. If you don't get anything shot before two o'clock, it's never a problem. In fact, I wouldn't expect to get anything shot before lunch on the third day."

The best bit of the process, she says, is looking at the first set of Polaroid tests and discovering that the ideas are working. The worst is the very first bit, when the models try on the clothes before their hair and make-up are done, so that the photographer, hair stylist and make-up artist can see what the shoot's going to be about. "Everyone stands around and has an opinion about the clothes, which is really difficult. I feel like I'm being scrutinized and get really defensive." But it's vital for the other creatives on the shoot, giving them their cues. "And good fashion photographers are so experienced, if they can't get inspired about the clothes then they find it really difficult to photograph."

There's a similar stage of stomach-churning exposure when she's acting as a consultant for the shows—currently for Louis Vuitton menswear, Prada and Miu Miu. "You'll have the whole design team there, and the creative director and the director of the whole company, all there watching you perform as you show your ideas. It's a bit like being Tommy Cooper!' [For the non-Brits, Tommy Cooper was a very famous, slightly eccentric stand-up comedian and magician who, tragically, suffered a fatal heart attack on stage during a live televised show, upon which the audience laughed politely, thinking it was part of the act.]

Consulting for fashion houses seems a curiously nebulous, shadowy business for anyone not directly involved. Katie has no official title at either of the houses for whom she currently works, and some that she's worked for previously she's not allowed to talk about in interviews, a common restriction for freelance consultants. So what exactly does she do?

Her input for the runway shows for both the Prada and Louis Vuitton houses differs according to the character of the houses themselves, Katie says. "At Vuitton it's very organized. You have the clothes six days before the show, and your job is a matter of putting them together and working with Marc [Jacobs] and their design team to make sure they like how it's put together." The process at Prada, on the other hand, she finds far harder to describe. "Mrs. (Miuccia) Prada works in a particularly unique way where the show evolves very late in the day. You're probably not working with actual garments until the night before the show, because she really believes that fashion is about what's happening now rather than yesterday. And that's very exciting to be around. She likes working out what the look is, and then the clothes evolve from that. She works on absolutely every part of the process, and all you're there to do, really, is facilitate what she wants.'

So what is it that Katie brings to Prada and Vuitton, and that makes her own work so shiny and glamorous, and yet so substantial at the same time? Is it a certain sensibility, a trademark aesthetic?

"Um�," she says, taking her time with this one. "Oh God, I don't know how this is going to sound. Without sounding wanky, um, I really understand fashion and the history of fashion and craftsmanship, and appreciate the amazing things people have done with clothes. And there are certainly a lot of stylists out there who don't really know much about� much, really." Another pause. "But I did design and fashion at school, and read magazines for years, and bought clothes for years, and I suppose there's a proper fashion history education there that not everyone has. I suppose it helps when you're a client and you're trying to explain, I don't know, a dress from 1917. I know what that means, and I'm not sure that everyone else does."


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08-02-2008
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Eyes Without a Face
Pop Spring/Summer 2008
Photographed by Peter Lindbergh
Model Stephanie Seymour




scanned by J'ador-DioR

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06-07-2008
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http://lifeandhealth.guardian.co.uk/...d=networkfront

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09-07-2008
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^^^^^ thanks for the article model_mom

Shes really inspiring, especially because she didn't come from being a super rich, super famous or super beautiful start.

I her work.

It's a shame Prada got "sick of her"

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12-07-2008
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^^Hahah but at least she has a cool attitude about it, i love that.

I just adore her.

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12-07-2008
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^^^^ thanks

Shes cool in a genuine way. I mean shes not the prettiest or sexiest woman in the world, but she doesn't need to be - shes unique


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23-07-2008
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THE NEW FEMININITY
US Harper's Bazaar February 2004
Model: Karen Elson
Hair: Paul Hanlon
Makeup: Miranda Joyce
Stylist: Katie Grand
Photographer: Laurie Bartley







source | livejournal via boho_babe

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28-07-2008
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From www.guardian.co.uk

Quote:
Why Katie Grand is the most-wanted woman in fashion

Friend of Madonna, Stella and Agyness. Editor of the magazine that persuades A-listers to take their clothes off. Katie Grand has come a long way since being a nerdy, weight-obsessed teenager who dreamt of editing Vogue. Lynn Barber meets an icon of cool

Lynn Barber , The Observer, Sunday July 6 2008

Katie Grand recently spent £2,000 on dry-cleaning all her clothes, because she'd found moths in the house. The reason it cost £2,000 to dry-clean her clothes was because she has kept every garment she has ever owned since the age of 15. When her last house was completely submerged in clothes, she started putting some of them in storage ... until she realised she was paying £250 a month in storage fees and that it would be cheaper just to buy a bigger house. So a year ago she bought an enormous house, in Tufnell Park, where she lives with her boyfriend Steve Mackey, bass player with Pulp, two guinea pigs, and her fashion archives. The sitting room is entirely lined with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves containing bound volumes of Arena, Blitz, Dazed & Confused, Elle, i-D, The Face, Harper's Bazaar, Vanity Fair, and British, American, Italian and French Vogue. Upstairs, one room is devoted to shoes and handbags, with dozens of matching shoeboxes with photos on the outside, but also great overflowing piles of shoes and boots not yet filed. Then there is the clothes room, which contains 10 rails, tightly hung with at least 500 garments, arranged in alphabetical order, A for Alaia, B for Balenciaga, C for Chanel, but also G for Gap and W for Warehouse because those were some of the first clothes she bought. There is also a rail of vintage clothes (Zandra Rhodes, Ossie Clark) and a whole rail of Prada. But the room is already full, so Grand thinks soon she will have to institute a two-tier system or, of course, buy an even bigger house.

She can afford to do this because she is known in the fashion industry as Katie-Grand-a-Minute. This is an exaggeration, but she admits after a bit of arm-twisting, that she earns £3,000-4,000 a day as a fashion stylist and consultant, and at present works 30-40 days a year for Louis Vuitton, about 30 days for Loewe, and another 30 days for a big Italian name. (She also works about 20 days a year for Giles Deacon but does that for free because he is an old friend.) This is all in addition to her day job, which is editor-in-chief of POP, the drop-dead cool magazine she founded in 2000. But that, she says, pays almost nothing - it takes up 70 per cent of her time, and produces only five per cent of her income.


With this formidable fashion background, I was expecting Katie Grand to be, well, grand, or at least terrifyingly glossy. On the contrary, she seems as fresh and unpolished as a schoolgirl. She wears no make-up, uses no beauty products (not even moisturiser), has frizzy hair and big gaps in her teeth and speaks with a Birmingham accent. She is 37 but seems much younger. She invited me to POP's office in Clerkenwell to meet her 'Popettes' - the editorial assistants who double as models for the magazine - and also Clara who turned out to be the office rabbit. Clara was hopping round the floor eating Ryvita; the Popettes, clad variously in torn jeans, sequined tops and gladiator sandals, were eating Ryvita at their desks. Grand clapped her hands and announced 'editorial meeting' and the Popettes gathered round her, giggling. She said she wanted them to 'think the Queen', and, after more giggling and conferring, they volunteered to go to Buckingham Palace, dressed as members of the Royal Family, and pose with the guardsmen. Then they all broke into song, 'They're changing guards at Buckingham Palace. Christopher Robin went down with Alice' and dashed off. It was the quickest editorial meeting I have ever attended.

Given the playpen atmosphere, it's astonishing that POP ever comes out, let alone that it's as slick, professional and successful as it is. It was launched as a twice-yearly with a print run of 70-80,000 copies. It now comes out three times a year - Grand is hoping to push that to four - and has a circulation of 125,000. With typical modesty, she says it's all thanks to Mark Frith, ex-editor of Heat, giving her good advice on cover lines. But of course the covers are brilliant too. For her first cover she photographed a group of her friends - but they happened to be Stella McCartney, Luella Bartley, Liberty Ross and Phoebe Philo - lounging around in their underwear. Then for the fourth issue Stella McCartney suggested they should have Madonna and rang Madonna who said yes right away. She arrived on time, agreed to everything the POP team suggested, posed for seven hours and parted friends - 'It was the most smooth-running thing we've ever done.' Then Victoria Beckham said she'd like to work with POP and Grand agreed because 'It seemed like the right moment - she was the most famous woman on the planet at the time.' And then she got Kylie, whom she'd worked with for years, and Drew Barrymore, whom she also knew, 'So there was a certain casualness about how it all evolved. Nothing ever felt that uptight.'


But of course it meant that Grand was then on the treadmill of having to find a celebrity for every cover, which introduced her to the horrible business of 'celebrity-wrangling'. She'd never had to do it before, 'and you end up in these great big pickles - one was so bad I was just crying all the time. A friend had instigated a shoot with a big, big Hollywood celebrity, but it was never in writing - and it should have been - that it had to be a cover. So I sent off this email saying, "Really great pix but we've gone with a different cover". And just got the biggest tirade back. The fallout was horrendous and it was a big Hollywood agent who will never work with us again and at the time I was just desperately trying to explain to someone, without sounding like a complete idiot, "I'm really sorry, no one told me how to do this". It was a hard way to learn and now I'm really careful that everything is in writing and we work with an agency for all of our celebrity stuff.'


But, she says, it's still very difficult to predict which covers will sell and which won't. 'Kate Moss was our bestselling issue ever but the Liz Hurley issue - which took a phenomenal amount of work - didn't actually sell that well, although it got tons of press coverage. [They photographed Hurley just six weeks after her baby was born.] So you get a bit caught up in the hype, and then the sales figures come in and you think, "Oh that's a shame!"'


When I met Grand she'd just been to New York for a POP shoot with the art photographer Ryan McGinley and model Agyness Deyn. She'd never worked with McGinley but he said he'd like to photograph Agyness, whom of course Grand knew, and Grand suggested they should do some nudes, because Agyness had never done a nude shoot, and McGinley agreed. 'And then a week later he sent me this reference photograph of kids falling off a fire escape - it was from the 1950s I think - and said he'd really like to have her falling. And naked. So we ended up with two stunt men and Agyness jumping naked from five storeys on to a huge huge crash mat. It was incredible.' Soon afterwards she did a shoot with Grace Jones, who arrived six hours late, but Grand was expecting that - 'We did her for Dazed & Confused about 10 years ago and then she was two days and eight hours late, so we kind of knew what we were getting into. But she was amazing, when she came.' Then Grand flew off to Madrid to do some styling for Loewe, and straight on to Milan for the menswear shows.


She works nonstop - she has only had three weekends off this year. But she likes hard work. She used to be a big drinker in her twenties - 'loud and obnoxious and falling over' - and found, when she stopped drinking in her thirties, that she had so many more hours to fill.


What does Katie Grand have that makes her worth £4,000 a day? She giggles at the question and, typically, deflects it with a joke. 'I've got a great collection of CDs which always helps when you're preparing a fashion show. At 3am everyone likes to hear some Dolly Parton - that's always a winner - and I'll never forget Miuccia [Prada] spinning round to Kylie.' But seriously? Obviously she must have a great eye, but what else? 'I suppose I've got a certain point of view that people like. And I'm crazy about shoes and bags and want every look to have a bag, and I love working with people on design. And I'm really quick at cutting to the chase. A lot of creative people tend to overthink and procrastinate and need to analyse things, and when you're working with big designers and you've got a show next Sunday, you have to say, "I like that, don't like that, let's do that, let's do it in grey".' In addition, I would guess, she is valued for her energy, her puppyish enthusiasm, her willingness to give other people the credit and the fact that she is fun to be around.


Her obsession with fashion started when she was 12, and her father brought her Vogue and The Face to read when she was ill in bed. 'I was really nerdy. And then kind of overnight I can remember clearly thinking, "I just want to be cool".' She grew up in Birmingham where her father was a research scientist at the university (the only Birmingham university scientist, she says, to wear Jil Sander) and her mother was a primary-school teacher. They separated when she was seven - her mother went to hospital to have some cartilage removed and never came back - and Grand stayed with her father, though she still saw her mother every day after school.


She failed her 11-plus - 'I was always useless at exams' - and went to 'quite a rough school where everyone was very kind of street-savvy so you end up with a bit of that. And my dad was very liberal and used to let boys sleep over, so me and my friend Jo were very social from quite a young age.' Her father meanwhile had a succession of girlfriends but eventually settled with one called Dianne, who encouraged Katie's interest in fashion and took her on shopping trips to London. 'I was quite relieved when he settled with Dianne - though for the first few months when she moved in, I kind of smashed lots of things.'


She also stopped eating. 'From 15 to 25 I didn't really eat much. I just wanted to be thinner, but I couldn't get under eight stone no matter what I did. I would eat two tablespoons of muesli a day with two tablespoons of water - I still can't eat muesli to this day. And then I'd maybe have two fruit pastilles about five, and then three satsumas and on a really bad day I'd have a banana. I can remember meals I had during those years because they were so rare.' And - presumably because of the extreme diet - she has never had periods, ever. But that doesn't matter, she says, because she has never wanted to have children. She has been with her boyfriend Steve Mackey for 10 years but 'he doesn't want to get married and I don't want to have children'. As the only child of two only children, she is adamant that the Grand line stops with her.


When she was 17, she wrote to Liz Tilberis, the editor of Vogue, asking how she could become editor one day. Tilberis advised her to go to Saint Martins so she went on an art foundation course at Bournville, Birmingham, where she was student of the year, and on to Saint Martins, where she made good friends with Stella McCartney and Giles Deacon. But she found the course disappointing and was happy to drop out when she met the photographer Rankin. He asked her to come and help on a magazine he was doing called Eat Me, and then on Dazed & Confused, which he started with Jefferson Hack. She says she learnt a lot from Rankin: 'He's very positive and he always had that mentality of do-it-yourself rather than work for someone else. That spirit of Oh let's just do it, let's have an exhibition, let's start a magazine.' They had an affair for a year or so, but she carried on working for Dazed & Confused for seven years, with no budget, no salary, but limitless opportunities to learn, and to show off her talents as a stylist.
Her big commercial breakthrough came when the Italian leather goods house Bottega Veneta decided they wanted to give themselves 'more of a fashion edge' and hired her to revamp their image. She got Giles Deacon to design for them, and 'We made a big splash with the fashion shows and BV was talked about as being this very cool label all of a sudden, and that brought me to the attention of Mrs Prada, who said, "Come and do something fun for me". It was an amazing opportunity and I think that was when people started talking about me as a stylist.'


Miuccia Prada, she says reverently, is the most inspiring person she's ever worked for. 'She is so bright, so smart, and so good at her job. Any suggestion she ever made would always make something so much better. She's just an amazingly smart woman with impeccable taste.' So why did Katie stop working for her? 'She stopped working with me, unfortunately. I think she got bored with me. I was due to go and shoot the Miu Miu campaign and I got a phone call saying they'd decided to use a different stylist. So I cried a bit. I still see her socially and still adore her and she's always very sweet to me, but I think she was bored. She kind of gets over people. But it's just horribly upsetting to be at the receiving end.'


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Meanwhile, Emap, now Bauer, (Heat, Grazia, FHM) had lured Katie from Dazed & Confused to be fashion director of The Face in 1999, with the promise that she could eventually start her own magazine. She launched POP in 2000 and it made money right from the start, largely because it had such low overheads, whereas The Face quietly expired under the weight of its own payroll (it had 25 staff at one point). Katie chose to put almost all her budget into production and very little into salaries - she used to joke that she was the lowest-paid person at Emap. 'But I'd much rather keep the standard high as it is, than that I got paid more. That's how we get everyone to shoot for us - because the printing is beautiful. Often the photographers are using their own money, so you feel you owe it to them to print as well as possible.' And bright young things flock to work for POP for peanuts because they know it will look good on their CVs and eventually translate into the sort of grand-a-minute advertising gigs that will pay their mortgages.


Last year Mulberry tried to hire Katie Grand as creative director and she had a long think about it but in the end decided that, 'when push came to shove, it didn't feel like the right thing for me to do, because I never felt I was particularly good at design. I love working with people who are very very talented - Marc [Jacobs] is amazing, Giles [Deacon] is amazing, Miuccia [Prada] of course is amazing - they're just so much better than I am. I recognised at art school that I might be adequate - but there's a ton of adequate designers out there. And the problem for designers like Giles is that the actual designing, the fun bit, is probably less than 10 per cent of how they spend their day. Whereas the stylist can come in and just create this whirlwind - "Ooh, can we do it in red?" - and then you leave. So I always thought being a stylist was a much better job!'


But her first love is still magazines. She has abandoned her initial ambition to become editor of Vogue, because 'I realised a couple of years ago that, much as I love Vogue and W, the kind of magazines that are closest to my heart are the style magazines, like The Face, i-D, Interview. I find Interview magazine really inspiring - not that I'm comparing myself to Andy Warhol! - and I suppose I want to build POP into something equally iconic, with covers people remember.'


What else, apart from that? Does she have any wild ambitions? 'Ooh, that's hard. I'd love to meet the Queen! I keep saying to Giles if ever you get an OBE, I'd better be coming with you!' No, seriously, what does she dream of doing? 'I don't know. That's a really hard question. You know when you're in your twenties and working out what you want to do with your life, you say OK, by the time I'm 30 I'd like to work for Prada, edit a magazine, buy a house - and I ticked all those boxes quite quickly. But during my thirties I suppose I've solidified what I started in my twenties and I want to just carry on working with nice people doing nice things. I'm not unhappy with what I'm doing. But I really don't know.'

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04-08-2008
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Any more pictures of her work?

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24-08-2008
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i decided to post all her cooperation with Mert and Marcus for POP mag
im starting from 1st issue.

for your pleasure


POP # 1 F/W 2000

Trash white... clothing fluro

Anouck Lepere (there is also kristina Tsirekidze feauture in that ed, but it wasnt scanned and im lazy right now)

by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott





old anouck site- doesnt exist more

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