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13-04-2009
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Liz Tilberis - Editor in Chief, British Vogue & Harper's Bazaar ( 1992 - 1999 )
This thread will be for discussing anything about her,not Bazaar/Vogue,like her anecdotes,her talent,her style on editing an magazine,or her friendship with Lady Diana and so on...


Last edited by MissMagAddict; 08-08-2009 at 02:58 AM.
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14-04-2009
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she was a master. it's funny because people often referenced a feud or competition between she and anna wintour and frankly with liz there was no competition because bazaar won me over every issue. i don't think there's ever been or will ever be a mainstream pub so broad-minded and eclectic when it comes to content since liz's editing.

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14-04-2009
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^Which reminds me...



New York Magazine April 27 - 1992
"Anna Wintour and Liz Tilberis: War of the poses" by Michael Gross




books.google.com via rh85

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30-04-2009
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Liz Tilberis with Princess Diana
tilberis.jpg
Source: blogues.cyberpresse.ca/lortie

Liz with Linda Evangeleista
97_hbmar_editor.jpg
Source: readysetfashion.blogspot.com

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Last edited by BetteT; 30-04-2009 at 02:31 PM.
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30-04-2009
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And I found this on People.com where they were discussing her personal style, on September 18, 1995:


19950918-750-171.jpg


Quote:
Elizabeth Tilberis
Editor-in-Chief of HARPER'S BAZAAR

Two years ago, after she revamped Bazaar, Elizabeth Tilberis, at age 46, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. But the British editor managed to find virtue in adversity, championing cancer education in the pages of her magazine. She also refused to let the months of chemotherapy show their strain, shaping what was left of her hair into a Jean Seberg-style pixie and tunneling a 30-pound weight loss into a new size-8 wardrobe. Tilberis, who favored Ralph Lauren silk shirts, sweaters and trousers when she succeeded Anna Wintour as editor of British Vogue in 1987, now wears sleeker, more formal Chanel suits. She even dresses elegantly on weekends in East Hampton, N.Y., with her artist-husband, Andrew, and their two sons. "She's not a muesli-and-dungaree mother—but more a Gucci, Mizrahi mother," says Hilary Alexander, fashion editor of London's Daily Telegraph. Yet Tilberis describes herself as "a real fashion coward. I'm always six months behind." Nobody else seems to think so. "Liz's style," says designer Donna Karan, "comes from the inside out."

NEVER LOOKS INTIMIDATING
SELDOM WEARS JEWELRY
NOT AFRAID TO PAIR CHANEL WITH A PARKA
FAVORS BASIC BLACK AND WHITE
Source: people.com

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30-04-2009
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Ok ... one last thing, since I'm out there doing research:

Source: independent.co.uk

Quote:
LIZ TILBERIS was a former editor of British Vogue and for the past five years editor-in-chief of Harper's Bazaar in New York, one of the world's glossiest glossy magazines. She was an insider - at the centre of the fashion world and a close friend of the Clintons and of Diana, Princess of Wales.

She was born Elizabeth Kelly, the daughter of an eye surgeon from Bath. Her path to the editorship of two of the world's most influential fashion magazines was forged through single-minded determination: she fought for everything she achieved. Always a rebel, at Malvern Girls' College she refused to be confirmed, stating, "I don't believe in God." At Leicester Polytechnic, where she was a fashion student, she was expelled for entertaining a man in her room.

Determined, however, to study fashion, she obtained an introduction to the Jacob Kramer Art College in Leeds. The first person to look through her portfolio was Andrew Tilberis, an art tutor. Unimpressed, he dismissed her work as the dilettante output of a posh boarding-school. He noted the Leicester report. "We don't have hookers here," he said. Liz, though, was determined to overwhelm him with her enthusiasm for fashion: why she loved it, why it was important, and why she needed the chance to study. Andrew recalled that it was this speech - and her legs - which decided him in her favour.

At that time, 1967, Vogue was the leading fashion magazine in Britain. While still a student Liz entered the Vogue talent contest, which entailed writing three essays. She was the runner-up and was accepted by Vogue as an intern, on pounds 25 a week. She later said of her apprenticeship:
"I began by picking up dress pins at photo sessions, making tea, swapping risque stories with models and complimenting hairdressers and photographers. I made myself useful, generally; slowly, very slowly working my way up. I succeeded by knowing the right answers but when to keep my mouth shut, when to smile and how to do really good ironing. I also learned everything there was to know about fabrics. It was invaluable experience."

The then editor-in-chief and doyenne of Vogue, Beatrix Miller, remembered her first impressions of Tilberis: "It was her niceness, enthusiasm and eagerness, even over making coffee; and her boundless energy. Even though she was very young she had high aspirations."

Tilberis's first substantive appointment with Vogue was as fashion assistant, in 1970. Over the next decade and a half she learnt how to nurture the photographers' creative flair and to make models feel great.

In June 1987, after almost 20 years at the magazine, she was offered a hugely well-paid job in New York as part of Ralph Lauren's design team, which she accepted. She sold her house and packed her possessions. Two days after handing in her notice she was called into the office of Anna Wintour - then editor and about to leave for New York - and offered the editorship of Vogue.

Under Tilberis Vogue won numerous awards and prestigious front-row seats at the collections world-wide. Its circulation rose to a healthy 233,000. Her approach was direct but not dictatorial. "My staff are respectful rather than frightened. I would rather be criticised than complimented. I'm Machiavellian rather than malicious."

Those who worked with her soon realised that her constant self- deprecation was a clever camouflage. It hid a very tough, dedicatedly ambitious lady, but no harridan. She was funny and courageous, and her warmth and humanity shone through. Anne Cryer, executive fashion editor of British Vogue, whom Tilberis took with her to Bazaar, confirmed this. "She was always optimistic, no matter what the crisis. Nothing overwhelmed or depressed her."

Tilberis was very family-minded, close to her younger sister, Lois, her GP brother, and her mother. Liz, with her bob of silver hair, was attractive but never claimed to be a stunning beauty. "Fashion editors who look too good make models feel bad," she said. When she took over at Harper's Bazaar in 1992, she weighed 10 stone 10 pounds, "which is practically illegal in our business - even more so in New York than in Europe - and my weight became the subject of rude gossip. One newspaper article, one of the kinder ones, called me bovine . . . Under the influence of my slender staff I'd lost about 20 pounds that first year at Bazaar."

In her autobiography, No Time To Die, published in 1998, Tilberis detailed with painful honesty the personal obstacles she had encountered and her refusal to bury her strong emotional needs. She described how her father forbade her to marry Andrew Tilberis, "because he was a foreigner". (They were to enjoy almost 30 happy years of marriage.) She wrote of her devastation at not being able to have children; the failure of her infertility treatment; and her joy in eventually adopting her two sons: Robert in 1981 and Christopher in 1985.

Her fighting spirit is nowhere more apparent than in her account of her battle against ovarian cancer, which was diagnosed in December 1993. That day should have been the "most glamorous and celebratory" of her life. Some 250 of the grandest fashion people in New York had gathered at Tilberis's brownstone house to celebrate Bazaar's fashion awards that year, which included two Ellies - National Magazine Awards, the Oscars of the fashion press, named after the elephantine statues designed by Alexander Calder.
Hearst had taken out a full-page congratulatory ad in The New York Times. After almost two years, Tilberis had reversed its decline and it was once more recognised as one of the world's pre-eminent fashion magazines. Scheduled for surgery the next day, she told no one except Andrew.
Cruelly, it seemed possible that the cancer had been caused by her infertility treatment. In spite of waging a tremendous battle against the disease and raising public awareness of it, Tilberis managed to carry on working over the next few years, and Harper's Bazaar maintained its prestigious position in the magazine world.

Although eminently successful Tilberis believed that England never appreciated her. "In England it was, 'She's just the editor of a fashion magazine.' The literary group wouldn't talk to me; the acting group wouldn't talk to me; the newspaper journalists didn't want to know. Nobody was interested in me. In New York they call me Million Dollar Liz. I'll take Manhattan."

Liz Tilberis loved fashion, writes Sally Brampton. Her affection for it was in equal measure to her irreverence. She mocked it mercilessly - "Come on, guys, we're only talking frocks here" - and defended it robustly.

The woman who made it from the equivalent of Vogue's typing pool to become editor-in-chief knew every inch of fashion magazines, every trick, every cliche, every heart-wrenching image. She created many of them herself in her days as fashion editor when she worked with the great photographers from Terence Donovan and David Bailey to Bruce Weber and Arthur Elgort.

In her position as editor of Vogue's More Dash than Cash pages in the early Seventies, she subverted that magazine's elitist take on fashion with the notion of affordable chic. Scouring the market for unlikely sources of fashion - caterer's outfitters, army surplus stores, traditional gentlemen's shops - she put together her pages with flair and originality. Most of all, she made fashion accessible
.
Later, when she became fashion editor, she introduced the work of Bruce Weber and set the tone for the healthy, vital and strong images of women that have since come to dominate fashion magazines. Weber's first cover for Vogue, in 1980, produced in collaboration with Liz, was of a fresh- faced young woman, laughing into the camera and wearing no make-up. It so confused Vogue's printers that, when the proofs were returned, they had touched in the mouth with red lipstick.

Laughing women, kids, old jeans, T-shirts, men's white shirts, and even dogs in fashion shoots - these were all part of Liz's tenure as editor- in-chief of Vogue. She believed in fantasy too, and glamour, but always grounded in ruthless common sense. It was Liz who persuaded the Princess of Wales to pose for a cover for Vogue and, together with the photographer Arthur Elgort, gave Diana the clean, carefree image of the modern princess that she kept right to her death. The two became firm friends. Diana was one of the first people on the telephone when Liz emerged from the major operation that marked the beginning of her illness. "Diana who?" asked her husband, Andrew Tilberis. "Diana Windsor," came the reply.

Liz was a great leveller who loathed snobbery in people as well as fashion and that, as an editor, was her great strength. Everybody, in Liz's eyes, was equal, but nobody was more equal than the readers of her magazine. Earthy, practical and with a wicked sense of humour, the only thing she truly revered was talent, which she encouraged whole-heartedly. All of her ex-assistants, of whom I am one, remember her with huge affection. She became our friend, as well as our mentor. The charm, which she possessed in bucketfuls, was five parts warmth, three parts humour. It was a formidable weapon, wrong-footing even the chilliest opponent. Her reputation for niceness was legendary but disguised a formidable determination. She was the iron fist in a velvet glove.

She never forgot the snobbery that surrounded Vogue in the early years, and was determined not to allow the same culture to infiltrate her magazine. Her policy as an editor was completely open door. She inspired fierce loyalty, not only in her staff but also in the photographers, models, make-up artists and hairdressers who worked for her. She regarded herself as part of a team and never claimed credit for herself alone. "A magazine is made only of people," she once told me. "It walks in the door in the morning, and out the door at night. People sometimes forget that."

Liz never did. That's why she loved America. She loved its openness, its willingness to celebrate success and to embrace new ideas. When she was invited to New York by the Hearst organisation in 1992 to revitalise the ailing Harper's Bazaar, there were many on both sides of the Atlantic who said it was an impossible task. Undaunted, Liz set up camp alone in a dark basement in the bowels of the Hearst building. For three months, she talked into a telephone. Using tenacity, determination and sheer charm, she pulled together a strong creative team and within a year, Bazaar rose phoenix-like from the ashes to take its place alongside Anna Wintour's Vogue.

She loved every moment of the magazine's success and took great joy in it. When the paparazzi turned their cameras on her, she was incandescent with delight, for it marked Bazaar as a major player in the ruthlessly competitive American market. The media made much of the rivalry between Liz and Anna Wintour, the two English-born editors, and Liz, who knew a good story when she saw it, publicly played the game to the hilt. Privately, she expressed only respect for Anna Wintour, who responded in kind.

Bazaar is her legacy and one that she was right to be proud of. Liz was far too clever to go head-to-head with the vast, commercial machine that is American Vogue. Instead, she created a quieter, cooler magazine that took fantasy and understated glamour as its blueprint. Yet, at its heart it remained true to her vision of practical, democratic fashion. Her editor's letter in the present issue of Bazaar is typically Liz. In it she celebrates the humble sweater.

She took the chill out of fashion. Her warmth and humanity were ever present. Her illness she treated with robust humour - "my cancer diet" she said of her slimmed-down figure - and she campaigned tirelessly to raise awareness of ovarian cancer and wrote candidly about the condition in the magazine. Her courage, even when she was in terrible pain, was formidable.

Soon after a bone marrow transplant, in which she nearly died, she was back attending the fashion shows - unable to resist a look at what Calvin, Donna and Ralph were up to. She couldn't eat because her mouth and throat were ulcerated, and her fingernails had splintered to the quick. Typically, all she did was tell a funny story about Andrew having to get her tights on for her in the morning. When I commented how good her hair looked despite chemotherapy, she laughed like a drain. "Some fashion expert you are. Can't tell a wig when it's staring you in the face."

She was devoted to her sons, Robbie and Christopher, and to Andrew. "My boys," she called them. "My team."

Elizabeth Jane Kelly, fashion editor: born Alderley Edge, Cheshire 7 September 1947; Fashion Assistant, Vogue 1970-73, Fashion Editor 1973- 85, Executive Fashion Editor 1985-86, Fashion Director 1986-87, Editor in Chief 1987-92; Editor in Chief, Harper's Bazaar 1992-99; married 1971 Andrew Tilberis (two adopted sons); died New York 21 April 1999.
The reference to Vogue (above) is British Vogue.

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06-07-2009
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I loved Liz Tilberis, she showed how a woman could be ambitious without being abrasive.

Tina Gaudoin remembers the time she spent working for Liz (timesonline.co.uk):

Quote:
When I returned to New York with three years’ experience, I went to work for Liz Tilberis, EIC (Editor-in-Chief) of Harpers Bazaar. Tilberis’s trademark silver grey hair makes an appearance in the movie on the head of Meryl Streep and I’ve heard (although I have not yet seen the film) that some of her mannerisms are similar to Liz’s.

It was at Bazaar that I began to understand the magnitude of the job of a New York editor. Tilberis’s remuneration was allegedly a cool million (and Anna Wintour’s much more) with, it was said, a vast clothing allowance, an interest-free loan to buy a house and payment of school fees for her children.

Whatever she was paid, Tilberis earned and deserved every penny and more. She had been charged with the weighty task of challenging the market leader — Vogue — and thus Anna Wintour. For years, Vogue had been gobbling the advertising dollars in millions, hogging all of the great photographers and models, and growing its circulation base. Tilberis’s plan of attack was worthy of the CEO of a FTSE 100 comapny. She would hit Vogue where it hurt by launching a charm offensive on the advertisers (breakfasts, lunches and dinners every day of the week), she would offer lucrative contracts in the hundreds of thousands to photographers who were previously loyal to Vogue or Condé Nast magazines, and she would hire the best staff on the planet. The office was a veritable who’s who of fashion, with models such as Linda Evangelista and Christy Turlington visiting Liz and photographers such as Steven Meisel, Patrick Demarchelier and Peter Lindberg holding contract negotiations in Liz’s office.

It was exciting, but it was also demanding. At Harpers Bazaar I worked harder than I ever had done before — styling shoots, writing features and most importantly, lunching advertisers. Often I didn’t leave the office until ten o’clock at night. As health and beauty editor, the beauty advertising depended upon my creating a good product and getting along with the advertisers. My budgets for shoots and hiring writers were triple what they would have been in Britain. In New York the attitude is: to make money one has to spend money. The risks are also higher.

The deputy publisher of Bazaar left me in no doubt. “Honey,” she said, “this is big business we’re dealing with — can you handle it?” I could handle it, but it took all my time and energy. It also meant delegating a great deal. In the manner of The Devil Wears Prada, I often asked my assistant for help with personal matters — this did not extend to dog-walking or party organising, or even finding a nanny (I didn’t have children at the time) but had I been further up the food chain, I could quite easily see how it would have. Had I been Tilberis I might have had to delegate my entire personal life, such was her workload.

There was also the gritty problem of image. As Weisberger points out, you are only as good as you look in New York, and much store is put on grooming and wardrobe. As a former British beauty editor, this presented a problem. At the time it was almost a badge of honour among British beauty eds that we wore little if no make-up and trimmed our hair once every six months. Tilberis, whom Karl Lagerfeld once described as an iron fist inside a velvet glove, took me to task in a very gentle way. “You know,” she said as we rode downtown in a limousine to an Estée Lauder function, “the magazine would be happy to pick up the bills for a haircut and a makeover.”

The next day, on a photo shoot, I had Sam McKnight, the hairdresser of the decade, lop off my hair into a boyish crop, while we were waiting for Mary Greenwell (make-up artist of the decade) to finish making up the supermodel Tatjana Patitz. After she had finished, Greenwell doled out some advice to me. Later, when I bumped into Tilberis in the corridor, she beamed at me. “There,” she said, “That’s much better.”

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25-07-2009
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When did Liz Tilberis become EIC of British Vogue? I just scanned an issue from 1985 when she was not EIC and then one from 1988 when she was...and oh, what a difference in the shape of the mag

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25-07-2009
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She was EIC of British Vogue from 1987 to 1991 according to fashion-iconography.net

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25-07-2009
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ok, well Gwen is very reliable I guess I caught one of her earlier issues for BV then...

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25-07-2009
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timeline, from hearst.com obituary

1969 - interned at British Vogue after winning a Vogue talent contest, + had her own weekly fashion page in the Bath & Wiltshire Evening Chronicle.

1970 - graduated from university, joined British Vogue as a fashion assistant.

1974 - fashion editor at British Vogue.

1984 - executive fashion editor at British Vogue.

1987 - editor-in-chief at British Vogue

1991 - director of Condé Nast Publications.

1992 - editor-in-chief at Harper's Bazaar.

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29-07-2009
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I know that I will always remember Liz Tilberis. She was such an influential force in fashion. Her work for Vogue UK and Harper's Bazaar is incredible.

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06-08-2009
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Tilberis was THE BEST. A genius. I loved when she was EIC of HB. ALWAYS a model on the cover, the very best models in the eds inside, and sometimes a surprise-Courtney dressed up as Donatella on the September 1997 cover...good times.

I have a photo of Courtney with Liz somewhere, there was a party celebrating the issue and they had made a cake with Courtney's cover on it...Courtney's expression in the photo is of exhiliration while Liz has her arm around her and is beaming from ear to ear. Later that year, CL would win Woman/Style Of The Year at the VH1/Vogue Fashion Awards and she thanked Liz from the podium.

Anyhow, what a fabulous thread, it was nice to look back and see when this magazine was at its best (IMO) with a model EVERY month on its cover...so often Stella, Linda, Shalom, Kirsty, Amber, Naomi, all the greats were continuously recycled...it was not until 2000 really that I remember it going downhill and celebrities appearing on the cover.

I look forward to constantly checking this thread...Thank you both MMA and hfgl.

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07-08-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LetThemEatCake View Post
Tilberis was THE BEST. A genius. I loved when she was EIC of HB. ALWAYS a model on the cover, the very best models in the eds inside

Anyhow, what a fabulous thread, it was nice to look back and see when this magazine was at its best (IMO) with a model EVERY month on its cover...so often Stella, Linda, Shalom, Kirsty, Amber, Naomi, all the greats were continuously recycled...it was not until 2000 really that I remember it going downhill and celebrities appearing on the cover.
for the first year & a half during her time as EIC that was true (a model on the cover every month), then in 1994 there were 2 (Madonna & Winona Ryder), & sadly from 1995 onwards celebrities on the cover became more frequent & they were on around half the issues each year, until 1999, when celebrities were on 9 of the 12 covers.

i really prefer the days when magazine covers featured models. an occasional celebrity - fine, but not half or more issues a year, i find it slightly ridiculous, but i guess celebs on the covers sell more copies.

1995: Elizabeth Hurley, Uma Thurman, Julia Roberts, Sharon Stone, Her Royal Highness The Princess Of Wales

1996: Whitney Housten, Nicole Kidman, Elizabeth Hurley & Hugh Grant, Princess Caroline of Monaco, Drew Barrymore.

1997: Daniel Day-Lewis & Winona Ryder, Julia Roberts, Demi Moore, Courtney Love, Princess Diana, Gwyneth Paltrow.

1998: Sharon Stone, Uma Thurman, Fiona Apple, Cameron Diaz & Matt Dillon, Calista Flockhart, Meg Ryan

1999 (just the first 6 months when Liz was still alive or listed as EIC): John Travolta & Kelly Preston, Madonna, Elizabeth Hurley, Sandra Bullock & Ben Affleck, Helen Hunt & Courteney Cox.
later in the year: Michelle Pfeifer, Lauryn Hill & Tom Cruise

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Ever in Fashion
Harper's Bazaar Editor Liz Tilberis Loses Her Gutsy Struggle Against Ovarian Cancer
By Anne-Marie O'Neill
People Magazine, May 10, 1999 Vol. 51 No. 17


Quote:
As editor-in-chief of Harper's Bazaar, Liz Tilberis delighted in talking hemlines and haute couture with friends such as Donna Karan and Calvin Klein. But nothing thrilled the sleek arbiter of style more than hearing that her crusade against ovarian cancer, with which she was diagnosed in 1993, had helped someone. A reader called to say that Tilberis's 1998 memoir No Time to Die had led to a life-saving early diagnosis. "For Liz," says Jamie Boris, executive director of the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, of which Tilberis was president, "that was like a dream come true."

Alas, her own dreams of survival did not. After a six-year fight, Tilberis died in Manhattan on April 21 at age 51. Despite the severity of her illness, her death shocked many. "No one in the fashion world thought she was ever going to die—it just wasn't going to happen," says Patrick McCarthy, editor of the magazine W. That conviction was a testament to Tilberis's grace: In an industry known more for backbiting than beneficence, she was famous for radiating warmth. "Liz came from one place, and that was love," says Donna Karan. "She made everyone feel good." Not that the British expat was any pushover: She reportedly banged her share of boardroom tables and once even slugged a security guard for shoving one of her editors at a fashion show. "Liz was the snap, crackle and pop of the fashion world," says Manhattan socialite Blaine Trump.

In her seven-year reign, Tilberis single-handedly revived the once-struggling Harper's Bazaar, introducing a dramatic redesign, increasing circulation by 25 percent and making dozens of strong alliances along the way. "People who only met her once in the course of business feel they were close friends," says her husband of 27 years, Andrew Tilberis, 56, an artist and father to their sons Robert, 17, and Christopher, 14. "That's the kind of effect Liz had."

Though devoted to her family (she rushed back to their Manhattan home to cook dinner most nights), "work was her passion," says Andrew. When cancer treatments—including a bone-marrow transplant in 1995—intervened, she held meetings at her hospital bed. "For Liz, fashion wasn't simply a career," says Bazaar's fashion director Tonne Goodman. "It was part of her life."

And always had been. "I was interested in fashion from the time I got my first doll," Tilberis told PEOPLE last year. Her parents—Thomas Kelly, an eye surgeon, and his wife, Janet, a homemaker—had academic ambitions for the eldest of their three children, but Tilberis opted to study fashion design. After getting kicked out of Leicester Polytechnic in 1965 for entertaining a boy in her room, she briefly attended art college, where she fell in love with Andrew, who was her tutor, then returned to Leicester and completed her design degree.

By the time she and Andrew wed in July 1971, Tilberis was working her way up as a fashion assistant at British Vogue. Childless in her early 30s, she underwent unsuccessful fertility treatments before electing to adopt in '81. (Later she blamed the treatments, which some research has associated with ovarian cancer, for her illness.) In 1987 she was named editor-in-chief of British Vogue, replacing fellow Brit Anna Wintour, now editor of the U.S. edition.

Five years later, Tilberis too was lured across the Atlantic. Taking the helm at Bazaar, she won a reputation for encouraging young designers, taking artistic risks—and maintaining a stiff upper lip. She was still scrutinizing magazine layouts at home a few days before she died. "If I were to ask her, 'How would you like to be remembered?' " says London PR. executive Phyllis Walters, a friend of 27 years, "she would say, 'Don't be silly.' She fought harder than anyone I know."

Anne-Marie O'Neill
Natasha Stoynoff and Ward Morehouse III in New York City and Joanna Blonska in London
Source: people.com
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