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19-11-2007
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it's not really Olivier Rizzo's related and this is pretty old...
but i saw some names (Panos, Nicola....) we like in this article and as i don't wanna loose it and want to share it ...
here it is...

Quote:
New wave


Independent, The (London), Sep 20, 2003 by Jo Ann Furniss



MENSWEAR. The word used to strike fear - or at least apathy - into the hearts of those devotees of its sluttish big sister, womenswear. But while many once scoffed at the world of men's fashion, with their preconceived notions of acres of grey flannel, dress-down Fridays, trite-homoerotic and hackneyed, secret-agent masturbatory fantasies, the question is, who's laughing now? Womenswear is currently a victim of widespread economic decline, supposedly bolstered by play-safe fashion advertising and celebrity endorsements. Take Christina Aguilera as the upcoming Versace campaign "icon". Despite the car- crash charm, this is a style arbiter who adopted the guise of a black- and-white minstrel in drag for her latest video. This, coupled with a certain aesthetic inertia, pages of mind-numbing "must-haves" and abundant, hollow photographic images in the majority of women's fashion-and-style magazines, seems to suggest that women's fashion is in something of a trough.
On the other hand, menswear has hit a decided peak. Today is an unprecedented period for men's fashion both in terms of design and the all-important image-making process - and, incidentally, achieved without a lumpen celebrity in sight. No longer trailing in the wake of its sister discipline, men's fashion is leading the way. The strength of the autumn/winter collections is just one of the more recent indicators of its new pull; from the big labels' revitalisation, seen particularly at Prada, Dolce & Gabbana and Louis Vuitton, to the influx over the past year of some of the more forward- thinking womenswear designers such as Nicolas Ghesquiere at Balenciaga, Hussein Chalayan, Veronique Branquinho and Viktor & Rolf. And that's not to mention a younger design generation, many of whom have their roots in menswear. These include Thomas Englehart, Peter Jensen, Kim Jones and Siv Stoldal.
Yet perhaps most interesting of all is the emergence of a new wave of photographers and stylists over the past few years, centred largely around the masculine world. In a fashion culture that consumes image far more readily than it purchases sensible trousers, the influence of this new wave - that has at its forefront the photographers Willy Vanderperre and Alasdair McLellan, the stylists Olivier Rizzo, Panos Yiapanis and Nicola Formichetti and the make-up artist Peter Philips - cannot be underestimated. And that's to name but a few of the image makers who, each in their individual way, are currently all engaged with creating distinct worlds for men through the fashion photograph. If, in recent times, menswear has attained that magic mix of creativity, coolness and, of course, commercial clout, this new generation is no insignificant part of it.
Crucially, this would not have been possible without the example set by a few key people who pursued a new agenda for men's fashion from the mid- 1990s onwards. In design, Hedi Slimane and Martin Margiela have been tremendously influential, but for some time it was Raf Simons who was out on his own with his iconoclastic construction of a new world for men. Inspired by Helmut Lang - the definitive design exemplar, who has also stayed true to his ground-breaking roots - he took the idea of a distinct kind of youthful, masculine alienation to a new level. As with Simons, the stylist Alistair Mackie was an early pursuer of this new men's fashion agenda and continues it with his work as fashion director of Another Magazine - a publication aimed at men and women - where he collaborates with and commissions many of the new generation of photographers and stylists. "At the beginning I had very much a womenswear view that I wanted to apply to menswear," he explains. "Because it was so dull at that point, I felt it should have the same direction and eccentricities that womenswear was capable of. Menswear had done it at times, particularly with the grunge stylists in the early 1990s and I suppose what I was doing with boys, alongside what Katy England and Jane How were doing with girls, was pursuing something of that aesthetic, sort of `neo-grunge'. It was what you would wear yourself in a fantastic scenario, or just the fact of pure fashion on men. When Raf Simons launched his first collection, then all of a sudden menswear had something of its own that was new. There was a revolution in the ways boys looked."
Mackie's depiction of a darkly poetic place for boys and Simons' cold, male, alien universe, as both would freely admit, is indebted to two important members of that grunge generation: the photographer David Sims and the stylist Melanie Ward. As Mackie explains: "I wanted to see something that was fantastical, strange and unusual, that a man could be part of, which wasn't about the way to wear a suit or `cool casual'. I have to say it was Melanie Ward who was the first one to do it for me - you have to have her at the top of the tree. She broke the mould and we built on that. In her pictures with David Sims, there was something magical and beautiful, it wasn't just reality plonked in front of you like some of the other fashion images from that time. It was a strange world, but reality was within it, which made that strange world possible. It made you think you could be involved in fashion."
The idea of the fashion fantasy world made entirely possible is key to the new wave of photographers and stylists. f In many ways they are the true inheritors of that grunge generation, intent on injecting some humanity back into fashion spreads as opposed to merely compiling glamorous shopping lists. This can be chiefly seen in their attitudes towards models, who are not just another accessory to be consumed on the page, but are people in their own right with a creative input into the image, who often sum up a notion of modern masculinity. Witness the importance of Robbie Snelders - who, as well as appearing in photographs, is also first assistant to Raf Simons - for many in the new wave. Yet what is perhaps most interesting of all, particularly in more recent work, is the synthesis of that early- 1990s reality, with a lyrical, older, fashion fantasy. Out of this integration a completely original viewpoint is emerging for men, which contains those contradictions and says something about the times.
Now, unashamed, almost shockingly conventional beauty sits alongside the more customary, brutal aspects of fashion images; elegance has been mixed with rebelliousness and a pop sensibility has been fused with the political. Aesthetically, the photography of Bruce Weber and the styling of Ray Petri holds equal sway with the influence of the images of Corrine Day. The clothes of Ralph Lauren sit easily with those of Helmut Lang and Hedi Slimane. There are none of the old cliches about the underground and mainstream - the supposedly "young and edgy" are quite at home within the pages of L'uomo Vogue - and none of the ludicrous debates as to what might constitute a "gay" or "straight" fashion image. Different creative relationships are also flourishing between established and nascent fashion generations, with heavyweight stylists and photographers such as Joe McKenna, Simon Foxton, Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin gladly working with lesser-known names. Essentially, there is real integrity and creativity in men's fashion photography and styling at the moment.
This month sees the launch of the 10th anniversary issue of Arena Homme+. Along with L'uomo Vogue, Homme+ is the leading men's fashion magazine worldwide. While women's fashion magazines in Britain have never achieved world-leader status, perhaps surprisingly, one men's publication has been quietly getting on with it for 10 years. Needless to say, Homme+ has not been slow to realise the significance of the new wave of photographers and stylists.
"There has not really been any A-list talent broken through in womenswear fashion photography for the last five years," says the magazine's editor and director Ashley Heath. "With the possible exception of Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, there has been nobody who has made the breakthrough to shoot for Italian or American Vogue and do the big campaigns. It's the same photographers that were huge in 1995 and it looks like they will still be big in 2005. One of the things we stand for at Homme+, as well as being willing and able to use those big photographers and stylists, is also the idea of breaking new talent and introducing new names: we have wanted to move things forward." The anniversary issue is a reflection of that new stable of talent, with retrospective showing-off made into a separate, hefty supplement. "The magazine has always declared itself to be a post-Buffalo, post-grunge publication," states Heath. "In menswear, there's not so much of a tendency to junk significant periods in fashion, or blindly reference them as there is in womenswear and I think that's why the current generation have had a solid foundation to work on. Those same moments in womenswear often appear like shifting sands, but in menswear they become building blocks for something new."
Fortunately for womenswear, and the bored-out-of-its-mind female readership of fashion magazines, the new crop of stylists and photographers have already made inroads into the big-girl's world. And, in true "must-have- a-trend" women's fashion-mag style, they look set to become "the next big thing".







...

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19-11-2007
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...and here it starts....

Quote:
Image 1. V Magazine `0' issue 1999
Photography: Willy Vanderperre
Styling: Olivier Rizzo
Make-up: Peter Philips
Model: Robbie Snelders

Willy Vanderperre
The first thing that I think about as a photographer is that I am handling a human being. You have to have a feeling for the person in front of you, it's their aesthetic that interests you. It's not like I want to transform that person into somebody else. It's a search for a certain kind of purity, almost an intensification of who they are. If you talk about Robbie, you tend to use superlatives, everything becomes bigger. As a person he's beautiful, he would sum up the word beauty for me. If I'm going to clarify what makes me interested in a person it's a sense of their belonging to something. That's where the romance is I think. It could be past, present or future, there's no time zone around it, they don't even belong to a certain kind of group, they are just significant in some way. That's what I consider beautiful and Robbie has that, he almost vibrates it.

Olivier Rizzo
This image and the others that went with it were taken the same afternoon in our flat in January 1999. Raf [Simons] did that amazing collection with the big, black capes. We shot it about a week after the show. We asked Robbie to model. It was very relaxed really, we were just hanging around, not really planning a concept, not like a regular shoot, we just wanted to see where it would go. I felt it was quite nice to have pieces of the collection with Robbie's own clothing. Then at a certain point I thought about Mickey Mouse, I don't know why I thought about it. Personally, I'm very much into old Mickey Mouse images from the Forties and Fifties and have quite a collection of them on T-shirts. At a certain point it was getting very doomy but still very romantic, I thought about putting one of my mouse T-shirts with one of Raf's pieces. Then Peter Philips said he wanted us to wait around while he tried something. Twenty minutes later he came back with Robbie and that amazing make-up was on his face. At that point he was just wearing some vintage black jeans - my favourite staple that I still use in a lot of shoots - and one of Raf's dinner-jackets. That look just stands for what I really like in men's fashion; a young, handsome man who is quite sure of his presence, a simple stance, a beautiful daylight picture, an amazing tailored dinner-jacket with his own vintage sweatshirt and tight jeans. And the weird thing is, the whole lot blends together with the strange, children's cartoon on his face. f Peter Philips
During that shoot, Olivier combined Raf's clothes with vintage, so in a sense, that's what I did as well. It was becoming dark and gothic, almost depressing - and that day I wasn't in a depressing mood. I got inspired by the styling, this Mickey Mouse on one of the T-shirts. I didn't tell Olivier and Willy what I was going to do, because I knew if I said, "Oh I'm just going to paint Mickey Mouse on Robbie's face," they would definitely say "no" because, well, it sounds stupid. So I said, "Just give me 30 minutes while Robbie and I go off into the make-up area" - that's their kitchen by the way. I draw a lot so I knew how to play with the perspective; I wanted to keep it to three quarters of Robbie's face, I knew where to put the mouth and the eyes, so that Robbie's eyes became Mickey's eyes. A lot of people don't really see the mouse on first sight, they just see some sort of bizarre, Kiss-style make-up. Then suddenly you can see it and this naive, very American image becomes something quite twisted and insane which completely fits with the story. We all felt it was quite special; it could only have been done on that day with that boy.


Image 2. Stussy Campaign
Photography: Laurence Passera
Styling: Nicola Formichetti
Hair: Tomo Jidai
Make-Up: Shinobu
Model: Thom


Laurence Passera
In some ways we thought that Stussy had drifted away from their initial energy and attitude and ended up with something quite commercial and suburban. I was a skater in my youth and I wanted to recapture what Stussy meant to me then. I wanted to do images that didn't take themselves too seriously; mixing a bit of a mischievous element with something that would keep your attention. This image, in a way, was setting our precedent; he was our anti-hero and a break with the Stussy past. Personally, I'm so tired of the snappy-camera aesthetic, if I want to glimpse somebody in the street I can do, I don't need a picture of it. I'm far more about something constructed and beautiful in an image. I want there to be a beauty in what I do, but not necessarily a flagrant sexuality - and that's the challenge in photographing men now.

Nicola Formichetti
We had total control over this campaign, it was art-directed by myself and the photographer, Laurence. Stussy let us dispense with the logo, every month we would change the image, we could do whatever we wanted. When I was growing up I used to wear a lot of Stussy and so did Laurence and it was that idea of making iconic images that would appeal not only to fashion people, but to the young audience outside of it. I choose a lot of models for their personal styles and Thom is a skater kid. Basically, on the day of the shoot I got a bit bored and started burning clothes. At the same time I was talking to Thom, who we wanted to take a portrait shot of, and, after burning almost all of the collection, panicking, and messing about with caps, this is what I came up with. It is one of my really big images, it has that humorous side to what I do, but beautiful too.


Image 3. L'uomo Vogue September 2003
Photography: Willy Vanderperre
Styling: Olivier Rizzo
Hair and Grooming: Peter Philips
Model: Tony Bryan

Willy Vanderperre
In real life Tony Bryan, the model here, is a greaser - so he has a real presence. This shoot was very music-related and was about growing up. We'd done a very Joey Ramone story previously for Homme+ and this shoot started where that left off. The story begins with a young boy called Dominic and then Tony comes into it with a certain fragility and romance. We had a complete nostalgia trip at first and we never have that usually - I don't like nostalgia. What we do as a team is very much about that moment when it is happening.

Olivier Rizzo
This shoot lasted several days with several models; from long hair, tight jeans, little jackets, braces, scarves, kind of early- 1980s, US-new wave, to a more European second half. Kind of like Curiosity Killed the Cat - remember them? - and Dexys. The whole pop music world in fact - which might sound really literal but wasn't. Suddenly, with the music we had on and Tony dressed in a certain way, with the light falling on him just so, the whole thing went quite melancholic. The atmosphere in which images are created is very important to me. This outfit and the pictures that came out of it, together with it being our first shoot for L'uomo, the location in London, that certain guy, the music, the light ... it really sums up what I feel at this point: an idea of straightforward beauty.


Images 4. Kim Jones Autumn/Winter 2003
Film direction and photography: Toyin
Edited by: Andrew Daffy
Styling: Nicola Formichetti
Hair: Tomo Jidai
Make-up: Shinobu

Toyin
I've been working on a book of 400 boys and during that process I decided I wanted to make a film. I shoot everything at home in Willesden - God knows what my dad thinks. I spend a lot of time talking to my models - you have to become infatuated with them. You can't just put anybody in front of a camera; not everybody can perform in that way. The first series of clips I did worked out and, really, this is only the second film I've ever done. There was also music being played while we were filming, I wanted something emotional and Kim put on Kate Bush's "Running Up That Hill" which became the soundtrack to the film.


Nicola Formichetti
I was working with Toyin on several projects for Dazed & Confused. At the same time she was doing her own personal work, where she was filming lots of boys informally. I work closely with the designer Kim Jones who liked what Toyin was doing. That's how this project came about as a presentation for London Fashion Week. It was an idea of letting the models do whatever they wanted. That's why the film is so natural; even though they might be wearing a striped romper suit and crazy accessories, overall it's actually quite toned down. That's how I style most of the time. I'm obsessed with youth culture in London, Japan, Berlin, New York ... I grew up between Japan and Rome. And it's that idea of freedom with clothing that I'm interested in, where people find their own style rather than being told what to wear.


Image 5. Arena Homme+ Autumn/Winter 2003/4 Issue 20
Photography: Alasdair McLellan
Styling: Simon Foxton
Hair and Grooming: Luke Hersheson
Model: JJ Sexton

Alasdair McLellan
The brief by Homme+ was to do something about England. It started off as a gangish, country-boy story. By the end of it the country boys were in the army and went to raves when they were on leave, so there you go. Simon [Foxton] and I worked on it for a long time. The Smiths are in there - even though everyone has been referring to them in fashion lately, which is a bit annoying. They are one of my favourite bands and their album covers had a big influence on me when I was growing up, along with Bruce Weber's photography. I think the story has that same feeling of longing to escape that you have if you are from a certain place in England. It was shot around Doncaster and it's about boys I went to school with who did escape into the army.


Simon Foxton
The shoot was started back in the winter. The Iraq conflict had not begun but was bubbling and I had been looking at pictures of demobbed soldiers after the Second World War and the way that uniforms fed back into youth culture then. So the initial starting points were things like battledress jackets mixed up with day-to-day clothes, but also the way that people coming out of the army don't have a firm place in society. I approach styling by constructing a world in my head. I suppose it's like doing a film in a way; you construct this place where these guys would live, the things they do and the places they go to and you just get a feeling for what they are about. Once you've got that feeling, the clothes suggest themselves.








Image 6. L'uomo Vogue March 2003 Photography: Alasdair McLellan
Styling: Joe McKenna
Grooming: Samantha Hillerby
Model: Sam Hazeldine

Alasdair McLellan
The original idea for this shoot came from The Two Of Us - one of those educational films about homosexuality that was shown at school, pre-Clause 28. It starred Jason Rush (also in the video for Morrissey's "The Last Of The Famous International Playboys") and Lee Whitlock (who used to be in the TV series Shine On Harvey Moon and was in Flowered Up's "Weekender" video). It's a bit towny and there's a slightly retro feeling in the clothing. My favourite shot is of Sam walking through the estate we used to hang around when we were kids - near Doncaster, in Tick Hill. It was the first time I'd worked with Joe [McKenna] and I was quite nervous. But he really encouraged me to be myself.


Joe McKenna
I originally responded to Alasdair's pictures because I liked the "touchability" factor. They were very attractive photographs and there were great-looking guys in them, but they were not unapproachable. That's what I mean by touchability - it's not a sexual thing - and that's what I tend to like in photography. That, and an original point of view. I don't really have ideas behind my styling to be honest. I knew what the location was and I know the town a little bit; it was a case of creating a character that would fit in with that environment.

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19-11-2007
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thanks berlin.
I thought of posting that the other day, I always loved the image with the mickey mouse face and the process behind it sounds fascinating.. I'd love to see him [and panos] working in person.. must be quite an experience..

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19-11-2007
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here it is


[from managementartists and art+commerce]

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^you're welcome Mullet...
I posted the same "tell me the story behind" in Panos' thread...
I was too lazy (and must go back to work) to do the same for Nicola, Joe McKenna etc.

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A FOREST
Pop Magazine Winter 2007
Photographed by Willy Vanderperre
Hair: Paul Hanlon
Makeup: Sally Branka.
Models: Ann Catherine Lacroix and Rogier Boschaart.
Scanned by J'ador-Dior.








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20-11-2007
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BABY DOLL BOY
Arena Homme S/S 07
Photographed by Willy Vanderperre
Models: Clement Chabernaud and Eddie Klint.
scanned by J'ador-DIOR via kiddokiddo.







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Vogue Nippon 2006 Oct(all britain issuemany things about brit style in this issue)

ph by Alasdair McLellan



scanned by s'ngac

i have the whole ed,but i cannot upload them to the imagevenue,damnand i just got this issue today,but it's in bad condition,so 'm considering tearing it up and re-scaning the eds.....if i got a scanner

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^ahh, finally a confirmation!. thank you, kasper.. can't wait for your scans. I remember seeing that ed when it just came out and falling in love with the overload of clothes and how they were brilliantly assembled. I totally forgot to check the credits back then and, when I did a few months later, they were probably wrong as cedric buchet was the alledged photographer and they also had someone else as the stylist. it's nice to finally know it was done by Olivier.. the entire story pretty much resembles his trademark all the way.. especially the ed she did with Jeisa Chiminazzo for Vogue Nippon as well.


GALLERINA
The New York Times
Photographed by Paolo Roversi.
Fashion Assistant: Charlotte Briére.
Hair by Laurent Philippon.
Makeup by Peter Philips.
Model: Ali Michael.
Source: nytimes.com





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03-01-2008
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the ed is called "British Rules",and page with the name of the ed on it is missing,if possible i will scan that

there's sth wrong with the imagevenue a couple hours ago,but now it's ok,here we comestill same source,here are 10 pics







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04-01-2008
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i'm checking this thread many times a day recently...i like his work with willy vanderperre esp...

btw,just found a tiny mistake,the tanya ed in #3 is from vogue china 06 march,not vogue nippon

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if not mistaken,this must be his work

Jil Sander 08SS


scanned by Faith


scanned by OhJane


source:Supporting-cast.com




jilsander.com


good campaign....but i dislike kasia

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I'm pretty sure it is.
quite possibly my favorite campaign of the season.

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14-01-2008
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... yes a very good ad campain...

I thought Olivier styled the Prada fw08 menswear catwalk, but wasn't sure (as it's not my fav. collection, so far...)
and Royal-Galliano is thinking the same but he has written it...
so do you think this is him????

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I'm 99% sure it's him.. the tucking is giving it away. :p

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