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15-01-2008
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"Clair obscur"
L'Officiel #869
styling: Nancy Rohde

patrimoine.jalougallery.com

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15-01-2008
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that break out story from D&C is amazing.

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15-01-2008
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^ the concept is really good, but I think it would have worked better with more striking colours or black and white

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Last edited by flyingace; 15-01-2008 at 11:00 AM.
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22-01-2008
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"Goddess"
numéro 53
model: Marija Vujovic

from yangabin.club.fr

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22-01-2008
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vogue nippon january 2008
models: Georgina Grenville, Liya Kebede

scanned by Kanna

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24-01-2008
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for those of you living in London, from art+commerce:


Spring Projects

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24-01-2008
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It's amazing!!!

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KATE INIAKINA-ROMANOFF
www.pressbook.com/vitalmakeup
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25-01-2008
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the 'Godess' ed is classic Sunsbo.

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01-02-2008
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vogue UK october 2002
model: Jessica Miller


from yangabin.club.fr

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01-02-2008
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"Cool new colors"
Harper's bazaar US june 2003
model: Dewi Driegen


from yanbabin.club.fr

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02-02-2008
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"Split personality"
harper's bazaar US january 2004
models: Adina Fohlin, Ujjwala Raut, Liya Kebede, Marija Vujovic, Julia Stegner, Hana Soukupova, Maria Carla Boscono, Elise Crombez, Tiiu Kuik, Daria and Tom Ford.


herfamedgoodlooks

"Giles Deacon: fashion's future?"
harper's bazaar december 2005
models: Elise, Hana, Eugenia, Stella, Raquel, Karen, Missy, Marija and Giles


herfamedgoodlooks


how to photograph various models and a designer? using a ladder.
It seems they liked the idea and repeated it. It's better the second one without the plain background

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Last edited by flyingace; 02-02-2008 at 05:44 AM.
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03-02-2008
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more album covers:

Röyksopp- Eple


discogs.com


Coldplay- the scientist, god put a smile upon your face (both singles)


sources: answers.com and coldplayzone.it

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03-02-2008
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An article about him, it says something about his past... I remember someone asked about his studies:

by Caroline Smith, 23 october 2003
Quote:
Norwegian fashion photographer Sølve Sundsbø is no stranger to pushing boundaries. He was one of the lead contributors to The Impossible Image, a glossy photo book published by Phaidon three years ago that showcased digital manipulation in fashion photography. Appearing with work by the expected blockbuster names such as Nick Knight (who was one of the editors), David LaChapelle, Mario Testino, Inez Laamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, Sundsbø's photos revealed hyper-real, slick worlds with perfect, airbrushed models that seemed to spring not from a computer but from an imagination running riot. Then last year his simple black-and-white image for Yves Saint Laurent became the first ad campaign to show a full frontal male nude in the US and in Europe.

"I don't set out to break boundaries," he explains, "but I'm incredibly restless. When I've conquered one thing, I could do it again, but it's not exciting. That's why I'm drawn to fashion--it's an industry that continually changes."

Sundsbø's international client list includes not only Yves Saint Laurent but Bally, Emporio Armani, Gucci and John Galliano. He's come along way from studying history at Oslo University. In his early twenties, Sundsbø started to take reportage and action photos of his friends skiing and clubbing and realized that he wanted to pursue photography seriously. He moved to London, went to the reputable London College of Printing and entered a fresh new fashion scene where the likes of photographer Phil Poynter and stylist Katie Grand were forging a new fashion style through the then fledgling British magazine Dazed and Confused.

A decade on and Sundsbø's name is now mentioned in the same breath as Nick Knight, his former mentor. Like Knight, Sundsbø is seen as in the vanguard of digital technologies -- the main reason he was picked to shoot the current first-ever global-wide Nike campaign. His images strike a chord with a younger generation brought up on computer games, Special FX and high-end graphics, as well as a 30-something crowd who are weary of the gritty snapshot esthetic endlessly replayed in the fashion press.

"He always makes the models in his photos look very powerful and in control, says Simon Robins, fashion director of Pop magazine, who first commissioned Sundsbø after seeing his portfolio of portraits. "They have a strong appeal which, when I first saw his work, was at odds with the fashion photography around."

He's also enjoyed more than his fair share of the headlines. The YSL ad raised an eyebrow or two, but largely critics were complimentary and the column inches flowed. Earlier this year, he shot classical singer Charlotte Church as a stunning high class vamp for the cover of The Face. It marked the end of an ordinary girl next door, turning her into a credible icon for an image-conscious teen consumer market.

"He's accelerated at a fast rate," says Nick Knight. "I can always tell which of the assistants are going to do well because they have drive. Add to that the fact that Sølve loves all things modern. He's excited by the future. New technologies have entirely changed the photographic landscape and he's someone who is embracing these different directions."

His three-year stint as Knight's assistant after he left college taught him his most invaluable lessons to date. He credits working for Knight as one of his biggest breaks. "It's extremely fruitful for many of those who work with Nick because you've been through such a variation of techniques and emotions," he explains. "You work at an extremely high tempo with someone who's already learned how to take pressure. He let me in on the highs and the lows. It was a roller coaster ride and very hard work, but most of the problems that I face now I've already dealt with as an assistant. The most important lesson that he taught me was that you should be able to carve out a square foot around you and create great pictures from that space all day."

Sundsbø has been called "the new Nick Knight," a label which though flattering, he hopes will soon wear off. "It's a compliment to be compared with someone who's made such an impact and is in photography for the long haul," he says, "but I don't aspire to be him. I hope that in a few years' time, people will say that I've developed my own thing. I want to be the new me!"

Working on Nike's world-wide campaign that hit US billboards at the end of July will certainly help. Nike's US art director Storm Tharpe, Todd Waterburry from ad agency Wieden and Kennedy, together with Markus Kierzstan, who runs MP Creative in New York, selected Sundsbø on the strength of his track record in digital photography and his fashion sense. The campaign's message had to be strong enough to create impact across the States, Asia Pacific and Europe. Based on the theme of movement, a selection of athletes were shot - no mean feat as they were all world-renowned 'A' listers, from sprinters to basketball players.

"Sølve was the only photographer who could do this work because the campaign could not have been done in camera," Kierzstan says. "You're looking at following around top athletes. To shoot them, we hired central studios in Atlanta, Miami, New York and London in order to fit into their schedules -- whether they were in training or competing. It was a case of getting each of them in the studio and shooting against a white backdrop and lighting." The results show each athlete airborne, courtesy of an invisible trampoline, as if they are literally flying across frontiers. The hyper-real backgrounds were entirely generated by computer operators at Metro Imaging in London and were loosely based around fine artist Richard Misrach's well-known skyscapes shot in the desert. Sundsbø doesn't work directly on digital manipulation, but he's involved as the director from start to finish.
continues...

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03-02-2008
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Quote:
"The inspiration from Misrach is not very literal but it was very handy in terms of explaining a color scheme to the client," says Sundsbø. "There was a lot of trial and error. We found a color scheme and then told the operator where we wanted the vignettes to travel from and to, and how steep we wanted the gradient to be."

There's more to Sundsbø's pictures than an avid engagement with all things post-produced. He believes that the concept of a brief is never about production, but always about the picture -- and the initial planning. "I plan intensely," he says. "For me to feel calm going into a shoot, I need to have a strong feeling about what I want to do. When it's good, I tend to forget all about the planning and take it into a different direction. It's only afterwards that I realize I've produced similar shots to my initial plans."
In fact, there is less manipulation in his images than a viewer might suspect. For his first Dazed and Confused men's fashion shoot, commissioned by then art director, Simon Robins, Sundsbø's series of "Reflections" sees a model glancing in a side mirror of a car watching an explosion or staring at surreal skies reflected in a mirror. Seven years after this series was first published, the hyper-real surfaces and artificial landscapes still look entirely manipulated in computer–but weren't.

"People are always surprised which of my shots are post produced and which of them aren't. Chances are, if it seems post produced, like "Reflections," it's not: it's all done in camera, using projections in the studio. At that time, I couldn't afford to use technology," he explains. A shoot he did for The Face's 20th anniversary issue is another example. The image of an airbrushed man and woman looked computer retouched but he says, "I used an old school technique -- retouching by painting. Visually, I try to make things simple by reducing information so the image becomes easier to understand."

For YSL's new launch of M7 perfume last year, Sundsbø's approach paid off -- by transforming what could have been YSL's highly controversial ad campaign into a contemplative, remarkably simple black-andwhite study of a nude. The assignment was to find a male model who was masculine and fit without having the overly muscular physique and shaved chest common for many male models in the industry or the iskinny-looking English boys always in vogue.

"Casting is always hard," Sundsbø explains. "That's why supermodels are used because after a while you know you can't go wrong. None of the models around were right for the campaign. We were looking for a Latin American or Southern French man who was unshaven and very fit without looking like he lifted weights. We saw Tae Kwon-do expert Samuel de Cubber on another casting, and he was right for the campaign. I had a digital camera and produced his portfolio in a morning."

The final shot that was used of de Cubber was more of an after-thought. "It was the end of the shoot and the images were coming out rather contrived because it's difficult to shoot nudes, let alone a full frontal male. I shot a couple more rolls on medium format with him sitting against the window with natural daylight streaming in. It was more of a portrait than a posed picture." The resulting image got attention but also praise from both sides of the Atlantic. "It seems to have struck a chord with people," he says. "Women and men like it because it doesn't threaten anyone."

With a brand of photography that blurs the boundaries of portraits, fashion and landscapes, even dissolving at times into computer-generated animation, it's surprising that Sundsbø doesn't want to follow in the footsteps of Juergen Teller and Wolfgang Tillmans who have both achieved success in the art world. His work was shown at the annual fashion photography festival in Hyeres after winning Best Newcomer in 1999 and he consequently returned this year as a judge. Still, he prefers his pictures in magazines, not on gallery walls. "I like the fact that in magazines they're seen by a lot of people and then thrown away. Besides, I find it interesting when I'm given commissioned and can throw myself into the work, exploring the brief fully. If I had to start from scratch, I'd probably stop."

Chances are, he won't be straying too far from fashion. The Paris issue of Big magazine currently on the newsstands showcases scenes of the city at night and he's excited with the results. "I obviously set out to take the pictures that I did, but when something really works, you get a kick. It goes beyond your own expectations. It's the same with fashion. You think that you're going to take a picture of a girl in a dress with hair and make-up, but then the person turns out to be unbelievable and the fashion is great. When it all comes together, it's fantastic."

So does he believe that the increase of beautifully crafted, slick dreamscapes from photographers such as himself, Knight, LaChapelle or Tyler Brule's stable at Winkmedia will push the snapshot esthetic out of view? "No way, it's too relevant and too many people understand the aesthetic," he says. "But technology will make things interesting. The computer has made post production and creating fantasy images an entirely democratic process, within everyone's reach. More people will be able to achieve things like the perfect skin. It'll be interesting to see where this direction takes us."
http://www.allbusiness.com/retail-trade/miscellaneous-retail-retail-stores-not/4450637-1.html

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06-02-2008
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I love his groupshots he did for Bazaar.

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