Alexandra Shulman Leaves British Vogue as EIC, *Update* Edward Enninful Confirmed - Page 16 - the Fashion Spot
 
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Originally Posted by A.D.C. View Post
Who is Ashley Brokaw?? Is she googlable??
Lol, power model casting director who works for big brands such as Prada, Louis Vuitton, Calvin Klein and Coach.

Got embroiled in a scandal earlier this year, you can read up more about that here:

http://forums.thefashionspot.com/f63...287267-40.html

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Seriously? Ashley? Damn, he's really going for his privileged friends without any kind of restrain. Does he think we forgot the Ulrikke scandal? I'm done, I don't care, I'm boycotting this magazine. I won't buy a single issue with this team.

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FMA Winner: Mario Testino, Creative Director of the Year

By Eddie Roche | September 15, 2017

Heís the most prolific fashion photographer working todayóand one of the industryís most game-changing creatives. No wonder Mario Testino is the mastermind behind a rapidly expanding empire.

Do you like being on the other side of the camera?
I embraced it a long time ago, because back in the í90s, when the girls like Kate, Naomi, Claudia, Christy, and Linda were covered in every single way possible, they started looking around at who could talk about them. Most photographers didnít want to talk, but I speak five languages and Iím quite chatty. Itís my Latin-American nature! I started getting interviewed by TV channels after the shows, and I realized our business was changingóbeing in front of the camera was part of it. You canít avoid it.

You now have a full service creative agency, MARIOTESTINO+. How did that come about?
It was reactive, rather than proactive. Dolce & Gabbana asked me to do [the perfume campaign] Light Blue and they wanted me to look after the whole thing. They explained the feel of the perfume, and I would film, photograph it, and deliver the project fully laid-out. The agency came from that moment. The clients were surprised by the ability to talk directly to the photographer, rather than going through an advertising agency. Then Burberry took their art direction in-house and they wanted to do it with me directly. Next came Michael Kors and LancŰme. Sue Nabi pushed me to make my agency more solid. She wanted me to come up with the concepts, do the layouts. The agency was an organic move born out of the demand from my clients to provide these extra services.

How many people are working for you now?
Almost 100! In addition to the agency, I started [MATE Ė Museo Mario Testino] in Peru, and it involves a lot of people. My work lives there as a platform for other artists to participate in. We also promote local artists and offer courses, and weíve helped flood victims.

You recently opened a New York officeÖ
America is the most understanding place for business and change. My CEO [Suki Larson] is American, and sheís very pro-America. Fashion photography at the base is about art and commerce. I always like the idea of being quite clear about what I do: We make beautiful images to sell products. Iím a real fashion photographer; Iím into clothes, hair, and makeup. America seems to be the place where things happen. In todayís world, where everything has changed platforms, itís important to be present and connected.

Youíre a creative machine. Have you ever had a rut?
FranÁoise Rosenthiel, the wife of Christian Lacroix, told me years ago that when somebody has ideas, they always have ideas. Today, I was telling my team that they shouldnít talk to me about jobs that havenít been confirmed. The moment you tell me something, Iím thinking about it. Iím 62, and most people used to retire around this age, but Iím working more than ever. Iíve always been obsessed by youth; itís fabulous. But at the moment, Iím really obsessed by knowledge. Something happens after 30 years of experienceóif your mind is still fresh, you can put it to work and do amazing things. Iím a big admirer of Karl Lagerfeld, who has been able to take everything to another level. Years of experience, curiosity, and professionalismóitís a fantastic combo.

You shot some fabulous models for the September cover of British Vogue. How did that come together?
I worked with Alex [Shulman] for 25 years, and she wanted to document what she had done and where her eye was still going. I once did a story on supermodels, and I brought in Edie Campbell. She was 15 or 16 at the time, and everyone wanted to know why I wanted her in it. I said, ďShe will be the next one!Ē I like that idea of putting these girls together, because they are part of the life of the magazine and my life. Stella Tennant married my assistant. Iím godfather to her daughter. Kate Moss has been my muse and my partner. Weíve shared so much over the past 25 years. Edieís mother is a friend of mine. Jean Campbellís parents are my friends, too. Nora Attal is the new find! I quite like this idea of these girls who are intertwined in our lives.

Now that Alex has left the magazine, will you still shoot for it?
I donít know, really. Itís early days. Theyíve just taken off. The natural reaction of anybody who takes on a new thing is to get rid of everything thatís been there in order to make your point and get your image and ideas across. I love Edward [Enninful]. Iíve known him forever, and we havenít worked that much together. But the things we have done together, Iíve really enjoyed doing.


We love your new Stuart Weitzman campaign with Gigi Hadid wearing a short wig.
Sometimes, you have to shake it up. Iíve been with the brand for many seasons, and they know that I am only interested in its successóitís not about me. Iím happy to say that it created an explosion in the press.

How long have you been collaborating with Michael Kors?
Fourteen years. He has a very precise idea of what he likes and who his woman is. I only see him through those eyes; I never sway. I like the idea that you can take the logo off a photograph, and you [still] know that the pictures are theirs. Advertising and marketing are about finding the DNA of a company, and being consistent and precise about that.

Whatís the story with your Instagram towel series?
Iíve always enjoyed taking peopleís clothes off! I canít show them naked, because itís not permitted, but I love the idea of celebrating bodies. Some have been born with a good one; others have maintained it. I donít have a good body myself, so Iím always in awe of others. When I find them, I always like to document and share them. I was so moved when I was talking to Kendall [Jenner] about The Dailyís cover picture. I told her I wanted to push it, and she said, ďDo you mean naked?Ē When I showed up, she said, ďI should wear a towel, because thatís your thing!Ē Something I created out of nothing became such a strong brand.

Do you have a favorite brand of towel?

I donít! Iím dying to do my own towels. I do have a particular taste.

Whatís so special about Kendall?
She is now. Sheís beautiful and has an amazing body; those are elements that attract us to models, but thereís something about her and what she represents that has changed the way we look at things today. Itís pop! In the world before, we were filled with rules and regulations of what was good, what wasnít good, what was chic, what wasnít chic. In came this family, and through reality TV, they shook up the way everybody sees everything. Before they were put in Vogue, they werenít considered the height of chic or glamour or beauty. I like people that believe in what they believe in and go for it.

Anna Wintour got a lot of heat when she put Kim Kardashian on the cover of Vogue.
We are journalists, as well as creators of an aesthetic product. We document whatís happening in the world. If Anna hadnít done it, Vogue wouldnít be relevant. Theyíd be staying with principles that are shifting constantly, instead of being the ones who create the shifts.

How would you describe yourself on a set?

I think that people forget that every second of the day is our life. I want to enjoy my lifeóevery second of it, if I can.

You work constantly. How many airline miles have you accrued this year?
Iím on a plane every three or four days. I love it. British Airways is my favorite airline, but I fly on them all.

How has Instagram changed the way you work?
Itís opened up the possibility of communicating with the people who follow me directly, which is priceless. I treat Instagram more like a magazine.

What do you do for fun?
The funny thing is that fun is my work. I have a great time all day long. I was a huge party animal. Beyond! I love dancing, and partying, and hanging out with people, and going crazy. But not anymore. My life has shifted in the past two years. My mother died a year ago, and at that moment, I stopped drinking. It was like a reaction. I identified that we are in a time of huge change in our industry and our world, and I want to be clear at this particular moment. I want to put every single element of my experience into one piece, and use it all in the next stage. For a long time, I was a photographer. Today, there are too many things I can do, and I want to make sure that I do them all. Iím finding the day much more exciting than the night. We spent 40 years of our life trashing our bodies, and then all of a sudden, weíre trying to get it all back into shape and hang onto it. Hopefully, Iím not too late.

How would you like to be remembered?

Iím not worried about that. Itís not that I donít want to be remembered, but itís about what I did when I was here. If I can help just a little bit, thatís what Iím concerned with now.
Source: Fashionweekdaily.com

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Londoner's Diary: Shhhh! A new chapter opens up for Alexandra Shulman

WHAT Alexandra Shulman did next: the former editor of Vogue has left the front row and is heading into the book stacks.

The London Library in St Jamesís has announced, via its agenda for the AGM in November, the fashionable entrance of Shulman. She will join the library as its vice-president, with Sir Tim Rice stepping up to replace Sir Tom Stoppard as president, who exits stage left after 15 years.

ďDelighted to be appointed a vice-president of The London Library,Ē Shulman wrote on Instagram, beside a pic of the historic membersí library. ďOne of the worldís greatest collections of books and publications, starting November.Ē

She and Rice will be kept busy. ďThe president is the libraryís primary high-level ambassador, appointed to champion the libraryís cause and reputation... and to play an active part in fundraising,Ē the AGM notes read.

Both roles are honorary, so neither of the new recruits will be reorganising the card catalogues, but they are sure to be the most popular guests at the annual Christmas party. Literary agent Caroline Michel, author Lady Antonia Fraser and University Challenge grump Jeremy Paxman are among the other vice- presidents.

Membership is rising to £525 a year and regulars include Stephen Fry, Kazuo Ishiguro, Simon Schama and, in the past, Virginia Woolf, Tennyson and Laurence Olivier. Former Londonerís Diary editor (briefly) Winston Churchill was also vice-president.

Some think fashion and intellectual culture have little crossover, but Shulman has shown she can go seamlessly from looks to books.
Source: Standard.co.uk

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Wow, now that is a true "showing of the finger". Girl scored it big.

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If the October issue is her take on diversity, then....
And btw, that last line reads very bitter.

I find it more interesting that all the candidates mentioned diversity, most likely when asked what they would improve in the magazine.

Quote:
Fashion needs a revolution. There are signs that it’s here

Emily Sheffield
1 day ago

This morning fashion editors will have caught the 5am flight to Milan. The style parade has moved on and London Fashion Week is over, leaving a trail of sequins and colourful plumage behind. This season felt like a particularly starlit extravaganza. The Americans came to town in their droves: we’ve had Giorgio, Gigi, Kaia and the irrepressible model Slick Woods. But excitement on the front row was mainly fuelled by the arrival of Edward Enninful, the new editor of British Vogue.

There has been acres of press coverage over Enninful’s appointment. And I was unwittingly caught up in elements of it. I ran against him for the editorship and the disappointment was a visceral knock. But, personal emotions aside, I was glad it was Enninful because although every candidate wanted to increase diversity (and the current October issue of Vogue, which I edited before I left, has my view) his appointment shouted a dramatic shift in a way no one else could and cemented what was already playing out on the catwalks.

But racial diversity across the industry is not the only battle that needs winning. The many variations of the female body shape are still largely ignored, despite many valiant attempts to transform the landscape. And here, social media has proved to be the most voluble instrument of change.

Last spring, casting agent James Scully named and shamed on social media those in the industry he considered to be mistreating models. His posts went viral. Just as London Fashion Week opened, the global fashion conglomerates LVMH and Kering announced a joint charter to protect the wellbeing of models. Millions of enraged voices cannot be ignored. And it included a pledge to ban any woman or girl under a French size 34. Not as exciting as what girl is capturing the current zeitgeist but vital nonetheless.

Our desire for the new also hides a dirty secret: fashion is the second most polluting industry on the planet after oil. Pioneering green brands never seemed to capture the imagination.

On Thursday, Livia Firth and Matches.com launched their green initiative. Again, Generation Z and Y and their opinions so freely shared are winning the argument. Global brands, knowing their future lies in their loyalty, have listened. H&M and Kering are among many fashion giants initiating far-reaching guidelines for greener manufacturing practices. This time their action means serious transformation. We hope.

Posh girls may not be in Vogue right now. So be it. I am all for revolution.
Source: Standard.co.uk


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