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02-08-2010
  136
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source | wwd.com

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HER OWN TEAM: It’s taken a while, but Sally Singer has at last made her first two big hires at T: The New York Times Style Magazine — and they aren’t from the usual megamagazine ranks. Michelle Kessler-Sanders, most recently senior vice president at Donna Karan, will succeed Anne Christensen as fashion director. Christensen, for those who forgot, thought she had the T editor’s job and rather than wait around to be pushed aside by Singer, decamped to become executive fashion director at Glamour.

Prior to Donna Karan, Kessler-Sanders served as president of Miu Miu USA, vice president and fashion director at Juicy Couture and accessories director at Vogue, where she worked with Singer. And in the normally gushy tones new hires reserve for their bosses, Kessler-Sanders told WWD, “Sally is one of the most talented editors and brilliant minds within our fashion universe, and beyond.”

Singer also tapped Jacob Brown as features director. Brown has been editor at V and VMAN for three-and-a-half years. He succeeds Armand Limnander, who followed former T editor Stefano Tonchi to W, where he is fashion news-features director.

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02-08-2010
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Quote:
(NEW YORK) As if the excessive Clinton wedding coverage didn't tip you off, the lethargic summer news cycle has officially arrived. Perhaps it's time you got around to actually reading the copy of August W that's been sitting on your desk for weeks? Come on---it's the first one masterminded by the excessively buzzed-about Stefano Tonchi! Surely you need all the dish on the Hyatt Hotels' first resort venture, the trendy new dermatologist facial, and Fabrizio Ferri's home on Pantelleria...OK, so change doesn't happen overnight. All the more reason to count the minutes 'til September!

And it looks like Tonchi has a few tricks up his Brunello Cucinelli sleeve. On August 10, he will welcome the press to lunch at 4 Times Square to host a "preview" of the September issue---and charm the would-be reviewers well in advance of their deadlines. (Keith Kelly, have you RSVPed?) An "intimate Q&A" with Tonchi, editor at large Lynn Hirschberg, and of course, vice president and publisher Nina Lawrence, will follow. But aside from all the new photographers, features, layouts, and the like, there's only one question plaguing The Daily': Can Tonchi sell newsstand? Eight more days...
dailyfrontrow.com

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03-08-2010
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Burda will test InStyle Men in Germany

The women's magazine Instyle will have a men's version starting on September 18, 2010 in tne name Instyle Men.

The magazine will be sold packed with Instyle for its first issue. From November on, the magazine should be sold independently.

InStyle Men will have about 140 pages and contains mainly topics about fashion and style with tips for beauty and outgoing.

Circulation: 200 000 copies.

source: my translate from mam.ihned.cz

More info in german:
http://kress.de/tagesdienst/detail/b...style-men.html

source: kress.de

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06-08-2010
  139
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Quote:
Newsstand is Down - But Does it Matter?
All things considered, industry observers expected fashion and lifestyle titles to have an easier go at the newsstand during the first half of this year. They weren’t anticipating large gains, but rather a “flat to slightly up” outcome. After all, the dispute between publishers and two major wholesalers, Source Interlink and Anderson News, has generally been resolved (they wanted to increase their per-copy surcharge for publishers and filed antitrust lawsuits against some, with Anderson’s recently being thrown out of court and Source Interlink reaching out-of-court settlements). And while not booming, retailers and fashion firms are seeing better sales after the disaster that was 2008 and 2009, meaning consumers might start buying magazines again to check out the merch.

No such luck.

With only a few exceptions, fashion titles saw yet further declines on newsstand in the first six months of the year, placing further pressure on them to hit their rate bases as publishers scurry to ferret out every ad dollar they can. “I think it’s fair to say media buyers will be paying more attention and wanting some answers,” said Jack Hanrahan, publisher of industry newsletter CircMatters, of the first-half figures.

With the exception of Essence at Time Inc., all fashion titles that posted double-digit declines in single-copy sales fell under Condé Nast’s umbrella. Teen Vogue fell 30 percent, W declined 22 percent, Allure was down 19 percent, Lucky declined almost 17 percent and Vogue posted an almost 15 percent slide. Bob Sauerberg, president at Condé Nast, said he expected this to happen, as the company has been pulling copies out of the marketplace and evaluating its distribution practices for more efficiency.

“We did some things on purpose,” he added, noting that overall, total circulation at all titles was up almost 1 percent. Also, 10 magazines had price increases during the period. Sauerberg said a key part of the company’s new consumer-marketing-driven strategy is to focus on subscriptions, which now account for 86 percent of the business, thanks to the Web.

Which raises the question as to how important newsstand sales are anymore anyway. While once a key barometer of a magazine’s true popularity with readers, given the “buy a box of Cracker Jack and get two years of this magazine free” mentality, newsstand now has become less vital as publishers have mended their discounting ways (or at least are hoping to).

“For years, we experienced newsstand decline while seeing subscriptions grow,” said Robin Steinberg, senior vice president and director of print investment and activation at MediaVest, adding that the slide in single-copy sales is not “new news.” Steinberg pointed to price increases — wholesaler consolidation forcing increased prices at retail — economic conditions and publishers providing content for free online as key factors in the decline at newsstand. She called the model of judging newsstand as the barometer of vitality “archaic and outdated,” and said new metrics need to be developed to measure consumer engagement.

Without new measures from which to draw, though, many still try to glean something from the monthly cover game. Hanrahan pointed to Women’s Health and People StyleWatch as titles to watch, with the Rodale magazine up 10 percent to 367,725 in single-copy sales (although its male counterpart, Men’s Health, must be suffering since it declined to provide newsstand data). StyleWatch rose 15 percent to 572,104. “Our June-July issue (with Lauren Conrad on the cover) was our bestseller — with 621,000 copies sold on the newsstand,” said People StyleWatch editor Susan Kaufman.

Over at Meredith, More was up 16 percent at newsstand, and editor in chief Lesley Jane Seymour attributed this to a change in cover strategy. “We’ve opened the door and taken away that over-40 rubric,” she said. “We’ve walked away from traditional covers.” Earlier this year, it was rumored the magazine asked Kim Cattrall to pose with a cougar (she refused, because of the connotation associated between the cat and women of a certain age). Meanwhile, over at Hearst, it was a good first half for Harper’s Bazaar, which pointed to its strong cover subject lineup for the first half as leading to a 10 percent rise, to 160,100, at the newsstand. The March issue with Kate Moss was the leader, said a spokeswoman.

And there is a new, emerging player in the newsstand game this year — the iPad. Over at Wired, the June issue launched on Apple’s much-ballyhooed device and raked in 103,000 in single-copy sales — and that’s not counting the traditional newsstand. Wired’s newsstand during the half jumped 15 percent to 93,908. It was the biggest circulation gain for any Condé title during the period (and, incidentally, Wired was the top ad gainer for the first half, up more than 20 percent). “The iPad expands the idea of the newsstand,” said editor in chief Chris Anderson. “It used to be something you passed on the street, but now magazines can meet you where you live, even if you’re not a subscriber.”

source | wwd.com

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06-08-2010
  140
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George Lois on the iPad

Quote:
"It's okay, I guess," he said. "But magazines will never die because there is a visceral feeling of having that thing in your hands and turning the pages. It's so different on the screen. It's the difference between looking at a woman and having sex with her."
source | nyobserver

Love that man

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06-08-2010
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I definitely agree with the sentiment, but I think that this is also a generational thing, there is a generation of consumers emerging who are used to receiving the bulk of their content via an electronic device with a screen and as such a new form of visceral feeling is being created that group. I agree that print will not go the way of the dinosaur any time soon, but at the same time the "looking at a woman and having sex with her" analogy while valid is also telling when you realize the impact that the internet has had on sex.


Last edited by agee; 06-08-2010 at 09:59 AM.
 
07-08-2010
  142
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I agree, agee. Generation Y-er here, 6-year magazine veteran, and yet I am ready to wholeheartedly embrace digital media. Especially when I think of the impact print is taking ecologically and economically (ie space in my apartment). But I suppose this is for another thread...

 
08-08-2010
  143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mishahoi View Post
Especially when I think of the impact print is taking ecologically and economically (ie space in my apartment). But I suppose this is for another thread...
That would actually be a very interesting thread. Because there are many problems that digital media brings along that I don't think many people have considered. For example, electronic waste.

I don't know, I'm Generation Y yet I am fairly old fashioned. I like physical books and magazines.

 
08-08-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueorchid View Post
I don't know, I'm Generation Y yet I am fairly old fashioned. I like physical books and magazines.
Me too!

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08-08-2010
  145
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueorchid View Post
That would actually be a very interesting thread. Because there are many problems that digital media brings along that I don't think many people have considered. For example, electronic waste.
Exactly, and it's quite difficult for most people to repurpose their electrical items, because they don't know the first thing about how they work - or how to to construct or adapt products - so there goes the idea of taking them apart and reusing the components for something else, like you can with paper or fabrics.

And even if a consumer is assiduous enough to seek out one of those technology recycling schemes, once you hand an item over, what really happens with it? How much gets put to proper use, and how much simply gets carted to a rubbish dump somewhere else?

People will buy a celebrity-endorsed T-shirt made of eco-bamboo, but tap away on their phones and laptops without a second thought for what's going on there, in the chain of supply and disposal. It's an enormous blind spot in modern consumption, where people are still at the stage of not wanting to think about it - so caught up with the idea of staying current with technology that they're willing to look past the aspect of waste.

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08-08-2010
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New Topic
Made one so we can move the debate out of this thread

Print Magazines vs. Digital Media: Which is Better?

http://forums.thefashionspot.com/f12...ml#post7696577

 
08-08-2010
  147
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Have you guys seen the NEW W?! ITS HORRIBLE!!! I'M GONNA CRY! Like seriously I'm very upset about the logo! I went to the W website and they still have the old logo I was so happy but they'll probably change it tomorrow...

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09-08-2010
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Cosmopolitan to launch free spin-off mag for students in UK

Glossy magazine Cosmopolitan is to launch a free spin-off title later this year aimed at female university students.

The National Magazine Company, publisher of the monthly paid-for title, is planning to print 250,000 copies of Cosmo on Campus for distribution at 65 universities across the UK when the new term starts in October.

The publisher claims the launch is part of a long-term strategy which will see it produce a new issue of the spin-off each quarter in 2011.

Initially these magazines will be distributed through its “Brand Ambassador” universities, which include London Met, Leeds and Leeds Met, Manchester and Manchester Met and Edinburgh.

Natmag said the new title, which is aimed at 18-21 year-olds, will be a 56-page magazine printed on 'improved newsprint'.

In addition, the magazine will be complemented by publication of a digital version by Cosmooncampus.co.uk, a new channel to be added to the existing Cosmopolitan.co.uk website.

Louise Court, editor of Cosmopolitan, said: "We wanted to produce a free tailored version of Cosmopolitan that talks directly to the student population and gives them all the honest and intimate advice they can get from the monthly magazine, but tailored specifically to their lifestyle as an introduction to the paid-for glossy."

Cosmopolitan, which is the second biggest women's lifestyle glossy behind Glamour, underwent a redesign last month overseen by new creative director Stuart Selner.

According to the latest figures available from the Audit Bureau of Circulations, Cosmopolitan sold an average of 430,353 copies each month in the second half of last year, down 4.5 per cent year on year. It sells for £3.40 an issue.

New circulation data for the first six months of 2010 will be made public by the ABC next week.

source: pressgazette.co.uk

Cosmopolitan launches spin-off student magazine in UK

The National Magazine Company is launching an ad-funded free spin-off of Cosmopolitan magazine, Cosmo on Campus, dedicated to students.

The magazine will target 18- to 21-year-olds across 65 universities in the UK, including London Met, Leeds, Leeds Met, Manchester and Edinburgh, distributed by hand on campus.

The 56-page magazine will launch in October with a print run of 250,000. NatMag is aiming to make the brand extension quarterly in 2011. Cosmo on Campus will include sections such as Confessions, Man Manual and High Street Hit List.

A microsite will launch within the Cosmopolitan website with additional features including offers, competitions and community links. The brand extension will also exist on Cosmopolitan’s Facebook page and through its Twitter Feed.

Louise Court, editor of Cosmopolitan, said: "We wanted to produce a free tailored version of Cosmopolitan that talks directly to the student population and gives them all the honest and intimate advice they can get from the monthly magazine, but tailored specifically to their lifestyle as an introduction to the paid-for glossy."

source: mediaweek.co.uk

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Last edited by GlamorousBoy; 09-08-2010 at 12:57 AM.
 
09-08-2010
  149
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source | nyobserver

Quote:
The Savior of Condé Nast: Scott Dadich Is The New It Boy of the Magazine World
Someday, when they tell the story of how digital magazines saved Conde Nast, it will begin in San Francisco's Caffé Centro sometime in May 2009.
It was there that Wired creative director Scott Dadich asked Wired editor Chris Anderson to meet him to discuss the creation of a prototype for a new digital tablet. Mr. Dadich knew the iPhone screen was far too small to re-create the magazine experience, but it got him thinking about a Minority Report-like touchscreen that could work. Mr. Dadich took out a cocktail napkin and drew an illustration of what Wired could look like on a 13-inch tablet screen.
The sketch worked. Mr. Dadich got the go-ahead to make a prototype (which they dubbed, cutely, Project 13), and skimmed a few thousand dollars off his own budget to make a five-minute video about the project. The video was a hit with Condé executives, who asked other editors and publishers to watch it. It was used to forge an alliance between Condé Nast and Adobe.
And about a year later, the cocktail napkin would take the form of the Wired iPad app, the first bona fide success in publishing's transition to digital apps. It has sold 102,884 copies since it hit the market, an impressive feat for a company that had been floundering digitally. Only weeks after its release, Condé Nast executives said they were changing the company's business model, appointing Bob Sauerberg as the company's new president to focus on new revenue streams, much of it from the digital experience. And sensing that they might be ahead of the competition when it comes to turning magazines into apps, executives at the company gave Mr. Dadich, all of 34 years old, an office at 4 Times Square, a new title-executive director of digital magazine development — to add to his role at Wired, and the assignment to help nearly every magazine in Condé's stable create a digital edition.
One result is that Mr. Dadich, who has lived most of his life in Texas, has skyrocketed into an overnight star in the Si Newhouse empire. He is — to put it in terms that have described many before him — the new It Boy of publishing. Having already established his print magazine design chops — Evan Smith, the editor of the Texas Tribune and Mr. Dadich's former boss at Texas Monthly, said he is regarded as "some sort of combination of Jesus and Pele" in the print magazine design world — it now seems like he is on the road to doing something much more significant.
His job, on paper, is to help editors at magazines like The New Yorker and Vogue manage their time and brainstorm ideas about what works on the iPad. But at a time when Newsweek goes for $1 and the industry is in desperate need for heroes, Mr. Dadich is widely seen as the guy who can bridge magazine design and technology, and bring the business one step closer to salvation.
"He's one of those clever people who can take history and the future and merge them into the present," said Platon, a New Yorker photographer who has won two consecutive National Magazine Awards for photo portfolios and credits Mr. Dadich for giving him his start in America. "People have done that before in other genres. Miles Davis did it, Frank Lloyd Wright did that. And I think Scott has the capacity to do that."
"With a talent like Scott, magazines will never die," said George Lois, the legendary former art director of Esquire.
"He just has it," said David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker.
"He will be the spark that ignites a conflagration," said Tom Wallace, Condé Nast's editorial director.
MR. DADICH GOT his first big break at Texas Monthly. Ten years ago, Evan Smith was coming in as editor and needed to find a new art director. Mr. Smith had little reason to consider Mr. Dadich, who was then just freshly out of school and in the job of associate art director for a mere nine months. He had virtually no previous experience. The art director position at Texas Monthly had been held by legends like Fred Woodward and DJ Stout. But when Mr. Smith met Mr. Dadich, he knew there was something unique about him. "I had an intuition," said Mr. Smith. "He had a combination of charisma and seriousness of purpose and a bigness about his ambition. You could see from talking to him for a very short period of time he had a plan — he had a plan for himself, and he had a plan for you."
Mr. Smith had a lot on the line. Every magazine editor ties his early fate to the art director. Mr. Smith conducted a national search, and there were plenty of candidates, but he couldn't get Mr. Dadich out of his head. So Mr. Smith called off the job search and decided to make a go of it with the 24-year-old. The business-side people down the hallway cringed at this prospect. "I think in every profession there are people who are born with certain skills and a degree of interests that just propel them forward like a rocket booster," said Mr. Smith.
Quickly, Mr. Smith's leap of faith was well rewarded, and Mr. Dadich's tenure as art director became almost as celebrated as his predecessors.
Wired had heard about him, and after several rounds of interviews, the magazine snagged him in 2006 to become its creative director. He became the first person ever to win both the National Magazine Award for Design and the Society of Publication Designers Magazine of the Year award three consecutive years, in 2008, 2009 and 2010. George Lois said that when you line up Mr. Dadich with the all-time-great magazine designers, "he's now joining the club."
But being a design guy for a print product was hardly where Mr. Dadich wanted to stop. "He has business skills, organizational skills, technical skills," said Mr. Anderson, Wired's editor. "This is a guy who can have a deep conversation about Objective-C architecture with one guy, a deep conversation about typography with another and a deep conversation about business models and distribution strategies with another."
"He always demonstrated to me an interest in the magazine from the 360-degree perspective that most art directors don't have," said Mr. Smith. "He cared about the business side, he cared about circulation, he cared about ad sales, he cared about everything, the whole thing."

IT WAS THE SECOND DAY in Mr. Dadich's new seventh-floor office at 4 Times Square, and the space was entirely empty, except for George Lois' MoMA Esquire book, an iPad and a document on his desk that was addressed to Condé Nast executives about the Wired tablet and labeled HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL. He was wearing a perfectly tailored blazer ("You gotta write all about his style!" said Cindi Leive, the Glamour editor), and he has perfect posture, well-groomed sideburns and slicked-back hair with a couple strands inadvertently straggling out, like Alfalfa. He speaks clearly and deliberately in a dry monotone, and the Lubbock native seems to somehow shed any trace of a Texas drawl ("I hide it pretty well," he said).
"I believe in the power of technology to upend an industry," Mr. Dadich said. "We see that every day at Wired. We watch how technology radically alters landscapes.
"The only reason magazine design looks the way it does is because it's the literal, physical limitations of two pieces of paper," he said.


Last edited by MissMagAddict; 09-08-2010 at 02:46 AM.
 
09-08-2010
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....

Quote:
"With this," he said, gesturing to an iPad sitting on a couch, "we wiped the slate clean. We have one pane. We have these many pixels. We have this proportion. How are we going to use it and how are we going to tell a story?"
The iPad happens to be the first of these devices. But as more tablet devices pop up on the landscape, it will become unwieldy to reassign the iPad work to outsiders. Today, he has no way to leverage the skills of, say, his art director in a digital environment since it requires two different skill sets with two different programs.
In Mr. Dadich's ideal, it will work like this: A design editor will open up his computer screen and there will be four images down the right-hand side. Two will be dedicated to tablet devices; another is for the printed product; the last is for a mobile device. The design director will lay out a page unique to each medium. If you're a story editor or a copy editor, you'll make a change once, and it will show up in every version.
Condé Nast's partnership with Adobe will allow magazine makers to use the same set of Adobe tools — Creative Suite, which makes InDesign — for both the printed version and the iPad.
This may be Mr. Dadich's dream, but it's not his alone. Adobe and Apple have been warring for years. In anticipation of the iPad release, Adobe had been preparing software that would essentially convert Condé Nast's content into an iPad and iPhone application. Weeks before the iPad was released, Apple said it wouldn't allow cross-compilers, and said that companies like Adobe had to build everything using Apple's own native software kit.
The people at Adobe and Wired engineered a quick-fix solution. They decided to do everything they normally do in Adobe's Creative Suite package, and then simply use pictures of them — PNG files — for the app while keeping little holes open for interactive elements. The Wired app was a ridiculously large file for this reason, and it takes a long time to download. This is something Mr. Dadich and Condé Nast will have to iron out if they want this thing to have real legs. But it was enough to fool consumers, and the success of the June launch was enough to convince people like Tom Wallace to go forward.
There is no indication yet how the Wired app did in July. Condé Nast will not release the numbers — which is probably a good indication that it's selling poorly when compared to June — but at this point, people seem happy with the direction of things.
Though three of the four magazines at Condé that have iPad apps have been developed by Condé Nast Digital, the Adobe projects are the most ambitious. Up next: The New Yorker. "I think Scott Dadich is going to play a serious role in developing the design of The New Yorker in print, on devices and on the Web," said Mr. Remnick, whose magazine is expected to have an October iPad launch. "And I invited him into that process because he precisely understands not only the design so well, but also is interested in making The New Yorker a better version of itself rather than an extension of Scott Dadich."
MR. DADICH NEVER was a big reader of magazines growing up. He was an arts kid in high school, briefly attended the University of Texas to study engineering, but transferred out and went back to his hometown of Lubbock to work in a bagel shop, where he drew the menu lettering and pictures of bagels and coffee cups on a blackboard. When a graphic designer saw his work, he scored a job at an ad agency. He enrolled in the design program at Texas Tech and did his ad agency job on the side to pay his way through college.
His flyover roots have won him fans. "Listen, I love Scott," said Ms. Leive, the editor of Glamour. "I love and I think lots of other editors love his willingness to share what he knows."
"He's this really nice, fun and amiable guy, and people wanna help him and bring him along," said Mr. Smith.
Fine qualities! But they would mean nothing if he wasn't scary-smart, too. "You're talking about finding a way to make digital magazines in parallel with printed magazines without going crazy," said Mr. Anderson. "There are so many moving pieces with digital magazines. There are thousands of individual elements with portraits and landscapes and interactive elements and all that. You need to think like a spreadsheet to ensure that you get the product out the door."
"The thing about the technology is, it is always the latest gimmick, the latest hot thing," said Platon, the photographer. "It's very seductive. For me, what makes Scott interesting is his respect for content. Of course, he does have this uncanny sensibility of embracing technology — not even what it is now, but what it will be. But he also has a deep understanding and respect for good design. I'm talking about history of design. That's where most technology goes wrong. The taste level is ****. It looks awful. There's no intellect behind it. There's no aesthetic behind it."
Mr. Dadich, he said, somehow overcomes this, bridging tech and design. "That's why he's powerful," he said. "He has good taste. He has done his homework. He knows the history of design and art and it's enabling him to do something with the technology."
"THIS IS OUR future, it's a very big part of our future and it's in our immediate future," said Mr. Wallace.
He was talking about digital magazines and how they would play a "major role" at Condé Nast and the rest of the magazine industry. "We're at the beginning of what I think is going to be just a monumental creative burst for this industry," he continued. "And Scott is the guy who is there at the beginning of this. He's helping to birth it — there's no question about that."
He said that Mr. Dadich's role, for now, is to instruct everyone on the lessons he learned from the Adobe experience. Mr. Wallace emphasized that the job is temporary, as Mr. Dadich helps everyone else get up to speed. Then, each magazine will go on its merry way and return to competing directly against its corporate siblings. From there, he wants Mr. Dadich to have a big role in the company to figure out ... well, whatever.
But what does Mr. Dadich want? "I'm happiest when I'm creating," he said. "And I would love to be an editor; I would love to take all of what I'm learning now and apply that specifically to something."
"There will be a point when I will want to go and create content in this model," he continued, "and assimilate all the lessons I've learned in this process into a physical product — maybe it's an iPad-only magazine, maybe it's a launch."
Whether he's right or wrong, he's a believer. "We're only just starting. The opportunities for connection and engagement are so high. The ability to bring in all those different kinds of experiences and all those different kinds of people who maybe don't think of paper magazines, or who think of the connection that happens when you find a brand you love."

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