How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Visualizing Fashion / Magazines
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
10-08-2010
  151
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,323
source | wwd.com

Quote:
I-D’S NEW EDITOR: London style magazine i-D has named Holly Shackleton as its new editor. Shackleton succeeds Ben Reardon, whose appointment as editor of GQ Style — the men’s fashion biannual published by British GQ — was revealed last week. “I’m excited to further develop i-D’s position at the forefront of the style press,” said Shackleton. The title celebrates its 30th anniversary with its pre-fall issue, which goes on sale Aug. 12, and later this year will publish a book, in collaboration with Taschen, called “30 Years of i-D Covers.”

Reardon, meanwhile, will take up his editorship at GQ Style as of the beginning of September. He succeeds David Bradshaw, who launched the Condé Nast title in 2005.

__________________
Love is what you want.

 
 
16-08-2010
  152
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,026
A look at the age of American magazine cover girls (windsorstar.com):

Quote:
Over-40 actresses have real style, real staying power, real beauty

August 16, 2010

When the September issues of fashion magazines -- typically their biggest of the year, ad-wise -- hit newsstands this month, the three most prestigious ones will feature actresses in their 40s on the cover.

Vogue has booked Halle Berry, who turned 44 on Saturday; Harper's Bazaar will have 41-year-old Jennifer Aniston, promoting The Switch; and Elle has landed 42-year-old Julia Roberts, promoting her new film, Eat Pray Love.

Putting these actresses on the cover of arguably the most important issue of the year sends a message that though we live in a youth-obsessed culture, there's still something to be said for the enduring appeal of women who have been in the public eye for nearly 20 years.

Laura Brown, projects/features director at Harper's Bazaar, pointed out that the average reader of the magazine is in their late 30s -- and that the readers view women like Aniston as "aspirational."

"They're cool, fashionable, interesting, compelling -- they have something to say," Brown said. "I love that they've grown into their style. One of the things about getting older is you do grow into your sense of self. You don't look victim-y anymore."

Lesley Jane Seymour, editor of More magazine, which is targeted to women in their 40s and older, echoed that sentiment. "They're the ones with real style, real staying power, real beauty," said Seymour, who previously edited Marie Claire. "As the American population continues to grow older, everyone can relate better to a woman with a little wear on her tires."

Plus, she added, "Who is there with any kind of real style or longevity in their 30s or 20s right now? Britney Spears? Kim Kardashian? These are flashes in the pan. Many are shallow reality stars like Snooki. Style icon? Um, talk to me in a year. Frankly, it's here today, gone tomorrow. Lindsay Lohan? What's to look up to?"

The statistics for several magazines bear her out. The average age of Vogue cover models in the past year is 34.5; Harper's Bazaar, 32.5; Elle, 31.6; InStyle, 34.2; and W, 34.9. Harper's had the biggest range, putting 17-year-old Miley Cyrus on its February cover and 47-year-old Demi Moore out front in April. (Moore also graced the cover of the December issue of W; she is the oldest cover model for those five magazines.)

Data released Aug. 9 by the Audit Bureau of Circulations showed that single-copy sales of magazines dropped by 5.6 per cent in the most recent six-month period measured. So it's ever more important for editors to select cover models who will appeal to people buying mags at newsstands, grocery stores and airports, where, of course, they pay full price. And in that context, older women can seem a safer bet, appealing to a wider audience -- and a wider magazine-buying audience -- than, say, a younger reality show star, singer or actress.

Indeed, it might seem as if the Twilight films have taken over the zeitgeist, but those movies' 20-something stars don't come close to the star power of older actresses.

At 46, Sandra Bullock is now the highest-earning woman in Hollywood, according to Forbes; she made $56 million last year with The Proposal and The Blind Side. Rounding out the top five were two actresses in their 30s, Reese Witherspoon at No. 2 and Cameron Diaz at No. 3, and two in their 40s, Aniston (No. 4) and Sarah Jessica Parker (No. 5).

It remains to be seen whether Kristen Stewart can open a non-Twilight movie, but in the meantime, films starring the likes of Parker (Sex and the City 2), 49-year-old Julianne Moore and 52-year-old Annette Bening (both from The Kids Are All Right), 35-year-old Angelina Jolie (Salt) and 40-year-old Tina Fey (Date Night) were box office draws this summer.

Outside of Stewart, no actress in her 20s has held a significant role in a box office hit this summer. Megan Fox in Jonah Hex is the prime example of a 20-something struggling for audience.

Indeed, the age of a cover subject seems to show that older often can be better. On InStyle's covers, 40-year-old Gwen Stefani outsold 25-year-olds Scarlett Johansson and Leona Lewis (648,000, 579,000 and 610,000, respectively) -- and all three were outsold by Jennifer Lopez, who was 40 when she was on the cover in September and sold a whopping 853,000 copies (though September, as mentioned, usually is the biggest month).
But not every over-40 woman is a sure thing, of course. Whitney Houston, then 46, showed up on January's cover and sold a relatively paltry 408,000 copies.

At Elle, when Parker, then 44, was on the cover in December, she outsold Lopez on the cover from February (285,000 copies versus 161,000 copies on newsstands) and 20-year-old Stewart's June cover (207,000 copies). Vogue also had good luck with Parker, whose May cover sold nearly 325,000 copies on the newsstand. Parker outsold June's cover with 22-year-old Blake Lively on the cover (248,000) and December's with Cate Blanchett, then 40, out front.

"I will put anybody of any age on the cover," Bazaar's Brown said. "I never think of someone's age when I'm booking a cover."

Bazaar has been relatively steady on the newsstand, with its youngest cover model, Cyrus, barely outselling its oldest, Moore (126,000 versus 114,000 copies).

Elle editor-in-chief Robbie Myers likewise was adamant that a cover subject's age has no bearing on whether the magazine books her. "We don't look at a subject's age when we decide to put her on the cover," she said. "It's a question of a certain kind of chic, what the project is and how excited we think the buyer will be about reading about someone at a particular moment."

But it's perhaps not surprising that Myers chose Roberts, whose Eat Pray Love, which opened Friday, seems to speak to a certain recession-era mentality of self-discovery and authenticity. And Roberts herself has a carefully cultivated persona of keeping herself above the tabloid fray, putting her children first and choosing her projects carefully.

Jon Penn, a magazine consultant and president of the media and entertainment division of Penn, Schoen & Berland, who works with clients (including several from Conde Nast) to do market research on magazine covers, said it's not surprising that editors are choosing seemingly approachable, down-to-earth actresses like Roberts for their covers.

"In the post-recession era, consumer values have changed at the newsstand," Penn said. "Instead of seeking out escapism into the lives of over-the-top and often out-of-bounds celebrities, consumers are drawn to the authentic, down-to-earth and relatable. We are in a period of reflection where self-improvement, not self-indulgence, is a new language at the newsstand."

There's also less of a chance that a cover model of Aniston's or Roberts' ilk is going to end up scandalously in the tabloids (though Bullock probably would beg to differ). Brown noted that working with these types of actresses in many ways makes the magazine's job easier.

"They give you just enough for the magazine," Brown said. "They know how to conduct an interview. Sarah Jessica Parker would give you the impression that she would sit with you all day."

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
 
16-08-2010
  153
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,026
And Media Guardian comments on the most recent ABCs for UK magazines (guardian.co.uk):

Quote:
Conde Nast

Total average circulation per issue: 1,539,661, up 2.8% year on year

Star performers: Tatler up 1.6%, Vanity Fair up 0.7% (both year on year)

Disappointments: Easy Living down 5.5%, Conde Nast Traveller down 0.6% (both year on year)

They say: "This strong story, with every Condé Nast title gaining sales, demonstrates the resilience of quality magazines," said the Condé Nast managing director, Nicholas Coleridge. "As the market shows clear signs of a recovery, our glossy titles and cross-platform innovations position us perfectly for continued growth."

MediaGuardian.co.uk verdict: Total circulation boosted by the launch of the UK edition of Wired, which only hit its 50,000 target circulation with the help of a 10,000 free giveaway.
Quote:
Hachette Filipacchi (UK)

Total average circulation per issue: 992,177, down 3.9% year on year

Star performers: Elle Decoration up 9.4%, Red up 5.2% (both year on year)

Disappointments: Sugar down 19.4%, All About Soap down 10.8%, Psychologies down 8.9% (all year on year)

They say: "Whilst the winds of change continue to blow and confidence in the economy remains a little uneasy, these ABC figures give reassurance that high quality titles, that are markedly different to the competition, will still attract strong consumer demand and in turn deliver attractive audiences for advertisers," said the Hachette Filipacchi UK chairman, Kevin Hand. "Hachette's first-half ABC performance is once again strong, delivering some good circulation increases and share gain for most titles. The growth of Red and Elle Decoration, especially, demonstrate that consumers are continuing to invest in luxury lifestyle titles despite the downturn."

MediaGuardian.co.uk verdict: The soap bubble burst but the good news is Red's in the black.
Quote:
National Magazine Company

Total average circulation per issue: 3,050,689, up 1.4% year on year

Star performers: Real People up 11.5%, Esquire up 10.3%, Harpers Bazaar up 8.1%, Country Living up 6.1%, Reveal up 5.2% (all year on year)

Disappointments: Prima Baby down 10.8%, Cosmopolitan down 9%, Company down 5.6% (all year on year)

They say: "Since 1910, NatMag has continued to lead the way in publishing – from the early day of pioneering magazines, through wartime austerity, the boom times of the 1960s and the recent global economic difficulties," said the NatMag chief executive, Arnaud de Puyfontaine. "So it's no surprise to see that we are still going strong 100 years later. The longevity of our company and our strong ABC results are testament to the excellent quality of our brands, the exceptional talent employed at NatMag and the strong connection our titles have with generations of readers. We look forward to bringing more innovative branded content and world-class magazines to our consumers and advertisers for the next 100 years."

MediaGuardian.co.uk verdict: Double-digit joy for Real People and Esquire but big drop for Cosmopolitan.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
 
16-08-2010
  154
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,026
Another look at those Jan-Jul 2010 ABCs (same source):

Quote:
Cosmopolitan and Company are biggest fallers in women's sector

National Magazine Company's Cosmopolitan and Company reported the biggest falls in the women's lifestyle and fashion sector, according to the latest Audit Bureau of Circulations figures for the first half of the year.

Cosmopolitan posted a circulation of 401,750, down 9% year on year and a 6.6% decline compared with the second half of 2009. Company reported a circulation of 217,324, a 5.6% year-on-year fall and 9.5% period-on-period drop.

IPC's Essentials was once again the biggest climber of the mainstream magazines, with its 115,432 circulation up 12.9% year on year and 2.9% period on period. Stablemate Woman & Home also enjoyed sales success, with circulation up 5.5% year on year and 0.3% period on period to 369,321.

Hachette Filipacchi's Red, edited by former Cosmopolitan editor Sam Baker, achieved another record circulation of 230,067. This was up 5.2% year on year and 1.6% period on period.

However, Hachette is still struggling with Psychologies, with circulation down 8.9% year on year and 9% month on month to 119,025.

NatMag's Harper's Bazaar performed strongly, with sales up 8.1% year on year and 7.2% period on period to 118,553. The publisher also had good news with Good Housekeeping, whose sales were up 3% year on year to 422,496, although this was a 1.8% period-on-period fall.

Condé Nast's big titles stayed on an even keel: Vogue's circulation remained flat at 210,561, while Glamour remained the biggest-selling magazine in the sector with year-on-year sales flat at 526,216, up 2.1% period-on-period.

Vanity Fair also remained almost completely flat both year-on-year and period on period at 102,445. Stablemate Tatler managed a 1.6% year-on-year increase, and just a 0.1% period-on-period rise, to 86,448.

"As the market shows clear signs of a recovery, our glossy titles and cross-platform innovations position us perfectly for continued growth," said the Condé Nast managing director, Nicholas Coleridge.

There was resilience among fashion weeklies, with IPC's Look down just 0.7% year on year, and up 0.1% period on period at 313,358.

Bauer Consumer Media's Grazia managed a flat performance year on year, and a marginal drop of 0.4% period on period, with sales of 228,770. Sales of Bauer's More, which has performed strongly recently, slipped back 1.9% year on year and 3% period on period to 187,159.

Sister magazine Yours, aimed at an older market, stabilised after several significant declines. Yours was down 1.3% year on year but up 4.5% period on period to 297,231.

Marie Claire, a joint venture between IPC and French publisher Groupe Marie Claire, continued to lose readers with circulation falling 1.9% year on year and 1.1% period on period to 280,021. But IPC's InStyle increased its readership to 186,251, a rise of 1.8% year on year and 1.1% period on period.

Hachette Filipacchi's Elle remained under 200,000, selling 195,625, about 200 copies more a month than in the previous half-year period to the end of December.

NatMag's She, the worst performer in the last ABC report, saw circulation fall 3.1% year on year and 3.9% period on period to 144,228. Stablemate Prima was up 5.5% year on year, and 0.3% period on period, to 289,058.

Overall, the women's lifestyle and fashion sector saw huge growth of 14.6% year on year and 6.9% period on period to 6,922,973.

However, these figures are influenced by the launch of free weekly Stylist, which debuted in the last ABC period and posted a 2.6% distribution increase this time around to 421,158, and the first recorded figures for another free title, John Lewis Edition.

JLE, from publisher John Brown, posted a debut circulation of 484,040, ranking it second only to Glamour in the category.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
 
17-08-2010
  155
Mr. Magic
 
Flashbang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Gender: homme
Posts: 102,729
Quote:
40 love: Sexy, older actresses dominate Sept. magazine covers
Wednesday, August 11th 2010, 4:00 AM

When the September issues of fashion magazines -- typically their biggest of the year, ad-wise -- hit newsstands this month, the three most prestigious ones will feature actresses in their 40s on the cover.

Vogue has booked Halle Berry, who turns 44 on Saturday; Harper's Bazaar will have 41-year-old Jennifer Aniston, promoting "The Switch"; and Elle has landed 42-year-old Julia Roberts, promoting her new film, "Eat Pray Love."

Putting these actresses on the cover of arguably the most important issue of the year sends a message that though we live in a youth-obsessed culture, there's still something to be said for the enduring appeal of women who have been in the public eye for nearly 20 years.

Laura Brown, projects/features director at Harper's Bazaar, pointed out that the average reader of the magazine is in their late 30s -- and that the readers view women like Aniston as "aspirational."

"They're cool, fashionable, interesting, compelling -- they have something to say," Brown said. "I love that they've grown into their style. One of the things about getting older is you do grow into your sense of self. You don't look victim-y anymore."

Lesley Jane Seymour, editor of More magazine, which is targeted to women in their 40s and older, echoed that sentiment.

"They're the ones with real style, real staying power, real beauty," said Seymour, who previously edited Marie Claire. "As the American population continues to grow older, everyone can relate better to a woman with a little wear on her tires."

Plus, she added, "Who is there with any kind of real style or longevity in their 30s or 20s right now? Britney Spears? Kim Kardashian? These are flashes in the pan. Many are shallow reality stars like Snooki. Style icon? Um, talk to me in a year. Frankly, it's here today, gone tomorrow. Lindsay Lohan? What's to look up to?"

The statistics for several magazines bear her out. The average age of Vogue cover models in the past year is 34.5; Harper's Bazaar, 32.5; Elle, 31.6; InStyle, 34.2; and W, 34.9. Harper's had the biggest range, putting 17-year-old Miley Cyrus on its February cover and 47-year-old Demi Moore out front in April. (Moore also graced the cover of the December issue of W; she is the oldest cover model for those five magazines.)

Data released Monday by the Audit Bureau of Circulations showed that single-copy sales of magazines dropped by 5.6% in the most recent six-month period measured. So it's ever more important for editors to select cover models who will appeal to people buying mags at newsstands, grocery stores and airports, where, of course, they pay full price. And in that context, older women can seem a safer bet, appealing to a wider audience -- and a wider magazine-buying audience -- than, say, a younger reality show star, singer or actress.

Indeed, it might seem as if the "Twilight" films have taken over the zeitgeist, but those movies' twentysomething stars don't come close to the star power of older actresses. At 46, Sandra Bullock is now the highest-earning woman in Hollywood, according to Forbes; she made $56 million last year with "The Proposal" and "The Blind Side." Rounding out the top five were two actresses in their 30s, Reese Witherspoon at No. 2 and Cameron Diaz at No. 3, and two in their 40s, Aniston (No. 4) and Sarah Jessica Parker (No. 5).

It remains to be seen whether Kristen Stewart can open a non-"Twilight" movie, but in the meantime, films starring the likes of Parker ("Sex and the City 2"), 49-year-old Julianne Moore and 52-year-old Annette Bening (both from "The Kids Are All Right"), 35-year-old Angelina Jolie ("Salt") and 40-year-old Tina Fey ("Date Night") were box office draws this summer.

Outside of Stewart, no actress in her 20s has held a significant role in a box office hit this summer. Megan Fox in "Jonah Hex" is the prime example of a twentysomething struggling for audience.

Indeed, the age of a cover subject seems to show that older often can be better. On InStyle's covers, 40-year-old Gwen Stefani outsold 25-year-olds Scarlett Johansson and Leona Lewis (648,000, 579,000 and 610,000, respectively) -- and all three were outsold by Jennifer Lopez, who was 40 when she was on the cover in September and sold a whopping 853,000 copies (though September, as mentioned, usually is the biggest month).

But not every over-40 woman is a sure thing, of course. Whitney Houston, then 46, showed up on January's cover and sold a relatively paltry 408,000 copies.

At Elle, when Parker, then 44, was on the cover in December, she outsold Lopez on the cover from February (285,000 copies vs. 161,000 copies on newsstands) and 20-year-old Stewart's June cover (207,000 copies). Vogue also had good luck with Parker, whose May cover sold nearly 325,000 copies on the newsstand. Parker outsold June's cover with 22-year-old Blake Lively on the cover (248,000) and December's with Cate Blanchett, then 40, out front.

"I will put anybody of any age on the cover," Bazaar's Brown said. "I never think of someone's age when I'm booking a cover." Bazaar has been relatively steady on the newsstand, with its youngest cover model, Cyrus, barely outselling its oldest, Moore (126,000 vs. 114,000 copies).

Elle editor-in-chief Robbie Myers likewise was adamant that a cover subject's age has no bearing on whether the magazine books her. "We don't look at a subject's age when we decide to put her on the cover," she said. "It's a question of a certain kind of chic, what the project is and how excited we think the buyer will be about reading about someone at a particular moment."

But it's perhaps not surprising that Myers chose Roberts, whose "Eat Pray Love," which opens Friday, seems to speak to a certain recession-era mentality of self-discovery and authenticity. And Roberts herself has a carefully cultivated persona of keeping herself above the tabloid fray, putting her children first and choosing her projects carefully.

Jon Penn, a magazine consultant and president of the media and entertainment division of Penn, Schoen & Berland who works clients (including several from Conde Nast) to do market research on magazine covers, said it's not surprising that editors are choosing seemingly approachable, down-to-earth actresses like Roberts for their covers.

"In the post-recession era, consumer values have changed at the newsstand," Penn said. "Instead of seeking out escapism into the lives of over-the-top and often out-of-bounds celebrities, consumers are drawn to the authentic, down-to-earth and relatable. We are in a period of reflection where self-improvement, not self-indulgence, is a new language at the newsstand."

There's also less of a chance that a cover model of Aniston's or Roberts' ilk is going to end up scandalously in the tabloids (though Bullock probably would beg to differ). Brown noted that working with these types of actresses in many ways makes the magazine's job easier.

"They give you just enough for the magazine," Brown said. "They know how to conduct an interview. Sarah Jessica Parker would give you the impression that she would sit with you all day."

Perhaps the more salient question, then, is who will be the Parkers and Robertses of tomorrow's magazine covers. Of the cover models on Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Elle and W in the past year, no one appeared on all four. But Parker, Blanchett, Moore and Aniston each appeared on two, along with 37-year-old Gwyneth Paltrow and 35-year-old Kate Moss. The only woman under 30 to appear on two of those magazine's covers was 22-year-old Rihanna, who was on the cover of Elle in July and W in February.

"The young actresses are fascinating in their own way," Brown said, "but they need to be put in the wine barrel a bit longer."
nydailynews.com

__________________
Our existence is not worthy without your presence. Join the fun!

(IT'S GOING DOWN
)
MENS Runway Model Showlists - Mens RTW S/S 2015
 
26-08-2010
  156
trendsetter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,118
T IN VOGUE:

Quote:
Sally Singer, the newly installed editor in chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, is rounding out her staff with a slew of former colleagues and famous daughters. Singer has named Ethel Park, an associate fashion editor at Vogue and longtime assistant to Tonne Goodman, to the post of senior fashion editor at T, effective Aug. 30. Joining Park in the fashion department will be Sara Moonves (daughter of CBS honcho Leslie and a former assistant to Vogue executive fashion editor Phyllis Posnick) and Vanessa Traina (daughter of Danielle Steel and a stylist who’s worked with Vogue contributing editor Marie-Amélie Sauvé), both of whom Singer has signed on as freelance fashion editors. “They see the link between fashion and the larger question of what’s relevant in our culture,” Singer said of her new recruits, adding, “They’re also quite connected with the generation of emerging designers, not only in the States, but abroad, as well.”

Meanwhile, those waiting to see how Singer changes the Times glossy will have to wait a few months — she said her first issue will be the Holiday issue, out Dec. 5.
WWD

I actually commend Sally for staying professional by not stealing Vogue editors. I'm looking forward to her first issue.

 
28-08-2010
  157
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tbilisi
Gender: homme
Posts: 17,865
Quote:
Remember Those Hachette/Hearst Rumors?

Lagardère, the parent company of Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., finally broke its silence Thursday and waved off rumors that it plans to imminently off-load certain titles to another U.S. company. Speculation has been rife recently that the French group was in talks with Hearst Corp. about some sort of deal involving Hachette’s U.S. titles, which include Elle. The deal was even said to possibly involve Hearst and Hachette linking up on a global basis.

During a conference call to present its first-half results, Lagardère executives confirmed the group had received “some interest from companies” and was obviously studying offers “because it’s our role,” but said there is, “no specific plan and no decision to really sell the magazines in the U.S. and…other countries outside of France.”

Lagardère increased its 2010 guidance earnings, citing an upturn in the advertising market. For the first half, sales slid 2.7 percent to 3.72 billion euros, or $4.95 billion, while net income jumped 20 percent to 97 million euros, or $129 million. Dollar figures are calculated at average exchange rates for the periods.
wwd.com

 
31-08-2010
  158
backstage pass
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: london
Gender: homme
Posts: 552
FRom last months Press Gazette re womens magazines and how they have stopped immovating.


3 August 2010
By Dominic Ponsford, Oliver Luft

Stylist editor Lisa Smosarski has criticised the conservatism in sections of the UK magazine market and called for greater print innovation to help reinvigorate established print titles.

Smasorski said that newsstand women's magazines have converged in their content and "become quite nervous".

"Everyone’s thinking about brand extension and digital platforms and thinking about magazines as multimedia brands – but actually it’s innovation in the core titles and engagement with the reader which will help them," Smasarski said in an interview with Press Gazette.

"There’s been a lot of focus on digital particularly, looking at different revenue streams and changing the business.

"But there is the bread and butter and magazines do remain at the heart of it, they have to lead and be exciting and invigorate the reader."

The former editor of More! helped launch Stylist as a free magazine in London last October as a sister title to free men’s title Shortlist, which launched in 2007.

The launch was sandwiched between the closures of free London daily titles thelondonpaper and London Lite, but Smosarski said the publishers were able to make a success of the title as there were a number of shortcomings in the existing women’s magazine market which it was able to exploit.

Stylist had a lunch ABC distribution of 410,000 instantly making it the fourth biggest women’s mag by distribution and according to Smasarski, advertising is ahead of target and the title is on course to reach breakeven by the middle of year three.

"I can remember going back to my university talking to the students a few years ago and saying the only thing I would genuinely be scared of in this market is a brilliant free women’s magazine," she said.

She told Press Gazette that lots of magazines were "playing it safe" and that the launch of Stylist provided the market which much needed innovation.

"People have been very negative about print over the last few years and very scared of the internet," she said.

"What’s interesting for us is we are not resting on the old publishing model. That’s possibly the problem for many people rather than the format that content is delivered."

Shei said readers have a "very intimate relationship" with print that the internet is unable to replicate and still made it a very appealing medium laced with potential.

"The problem is how that’s put into people’s hands. You’ve got multichannel TV, the internet, iPads, iPhones, all pushing content - you don’t have to go to a newsstand to get that media.

She said magazine companies had been slow in changing the way that they reach customers.

"The newsstand is a tough place at the moment and there are huge amount of titles competing for women’s attention," she said.

"What you’ve seen is a convergence of the content that’s being offered. In the celebrity pack for instance it’s really hard to differentiate between titles.

"People have got quite nervous and they did stop innovating…We said we are new, we’re going to break the rules and be different. It’s innovative titles that usually succeed."

The full interview with Lisa Smosarski can be found in this month’s issue of Press Gazette magazine.

 
08-09-2010
  159
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,026
From JournAlert:

Quote:
UK Esquire editor Jeremy Langmead leaves

Esquire's editor Jeremy Langmead is leaving his position at the magazine to join Mr Porter as editor in chief.

Langmead originally joined the National Magazine Company's men's title in March 2007, and founded the Esquire Man At The Top Awards as well as the Best Dressed Real Man competitions. Dan Davies, deputy editor at Esquire, will become acting editor until a replacement for Langmead is officially appointed.

Mr Porter is a newly-launched menswear website from Net-A-Porter.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
 
08-09-2010
  160
rising star
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 109
I'd originally posted this in the wrong place, the Lucky thread:

From nytimes.com

Quote:

Kim France Out at Lucky; Brandon Holley of Yahoo Takes Over
By David Carr
Kim France, the editor who invented Lucky magazine in 2000 along with James Truman, who was the Condé Nast editorial directer at the time, has left the magazine. She was replaced by Brandon Holley, who worked at Condé Nast in 2007 until Jane, the magazine she was editing, was closed. Since then, Ms. Holley has been working as editor in chief of Shine, Yahoo’s site for women.
Brandon Holley is the new editor of Lucky magazine.
Lucky, when it was first published in December 2000, was considered a major innovation or a huge abomination, depending on who was doing the considering. Although women’s magazines had always served as a nexus between aspiration and commerce, Lucky baldly celebrated shopping as a kind of sport.
It was, in retrospect, ahead of its time, a print rendering of a shopping portal on the Web. It was well received by both the news media and advertisers, in part because it was a well-crafted magazine that did not take itself too seriously and in part because Ms. France had significant magazine credentials. She had worked at Sassy, Elle, New York, 7 Days and Spin.

But as the recession deepened and shopping became less of a blood sport than a guilty pleasure, Lucky suffered a significant loss in advertising pages. Even as a weak recovery has brought other magazines part of the way back, Lucky has continued to languish. In the most recent Publishers Information Bureau statistics, advertising pages in Lucky were down 7.3 percent from April to June, compared to the same months in 2009; meanwhile, many other magazines directed at female readers recovered.
Given that Ms. France conceived a new category of magazine that did significant advertising business over the course of a decade, the news release announcing her departure was terse, without the usual filigree about her accomplishments; of Ms. Holley’s appointment it said: “She replaces Kim France, who is leaving the company.” That was all about Ms. France.
The appointment of Ms. Holley, who has extensive digital credentials, signals a level of seriousness around the Web components of Lucky’s business, but it could also foretell a time when Lucky – the brand — might exist only in a digital form. Condé Nast has shown very little sentimentality around preserving underperfoming magazines; it closed four publications last year. And executives there apparently decided that Lucky, which has had three publishers over the course of its existence, needed a fresh editorial approach.
Ms. France, who took inspiration from Japanese shopping magazines at the time and innovated an American version, was said to be reluctant to fundamentally alter what she created. Reached by e-mail, she sent a statement through a spokeswoman.
“I am exceptionally grateful to Condé Nast and Si Newhouse for what has been a tremendous opportunity, and something I will remember with only fondness,” Ms. France said.
The recent lack of sentiment in pushing out people and titles has people on cat’s paws at 4 Times Square, a headquarters that had long seemed to live a life beyond economic consequence. There continue to be rumors that Bon Appétit, which is the company’s sole food publication after Gourmet closed, will be moved back from the West Coast, and other magazines will be getting a hard look as well.
I do not like this idea at all. I didn't follow Jane religiously, but I do think Holley made it noticeably worse.

Moreover, I saw Holley speak twice while she was at Jane. Once I saw her on an online media panel. The other was in a "focus group" setting (young women talked with the staff about what they wanted to see in the magazine). On the whole, she seemed kind of directionless and out-of-ideas (not what one wants in an Editor-in-Chief). She was more impressive in the "focus group" situation, but I expected more from someone with her title (a strong creative vision, as cliche as it sounds).

I wonder if Andrea Linett will also leave; I think her and Kim have been close since their days at Sassy. And I'd love to be a fly on the wall in the Conde Nast cafeteria! Brandon Holley replacing both of the queens of Sassy!


 
09-09-2010
  161
V.I.P.
 
tentalicious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Italia
Gender: homme
Posts: 6,507
Press Release by Parlan Publishing Group
Quote:
Further to the press release issued on September 1, 2010 by the Jalou Publishers (France), and announcing the replacement of the publishing house for the L'OFFICIEL magazine in Russia, the Parlan Publishing Group makes the following statement.

The Parlan Publishing Group and the French Les Editions Jalou publishers entered into license agreement, under which the Parlan Publishing Group is a publisher for the Russian version of the L’OFFICIEL magazine. This agreement shall be effective until December 31, 2011.

Moreover the Parlan Publishing Group has a preferential right to conclude a new license agreement for publication of the L'OFFICIEL magazine.

The French publishers, which illegitimately, without any legal grounds, made a statement on the unilateral termination of the license agreement and on signing of contract with “ACT” Publishers, act in bad faith and intentionally abuse their rights in order to disrespect thereby undertaken contract obligations.

The Parlan Publishing Group strongly affirms that as long as the aforesaid license agreement has been effective, it did not commit any breaches, whether provided or not by the agreement, and therefore, as a matter of principle, there are no grounds for termination thereof.

Furthermore, the said contract does not provide a case for its unilateral termination by initiative of either party.

Should the French publishing house Jalou choose not to issue an official disclaimer of its press release, and should it execute the illegitimate actions specified therein, the Parlan Publishing Group will be constrained to submit petitions to competent French and Russian courts in order to prevent from violation of its rights by “ACT” publishing house that might start issuing a magazine, related to female high fashion, in the Russian market, which magazine would have a title including the word “L'OFFICIEL”, or have another similar title that could be mixed up therewith – that is, to prevent from such actions for the period of litigation. We have all the reasons to assume that upon our claim, the Russian court will put under restraint the bad faith actions of the Jalou publishers and “ACT” in Russia.

We also state that notwithstanding the information circulated by the Jalou publishers, the Parlan Publishing Group will continue to issue the Russian version of the L'OFFICIEL magazine and will unconditionally secure fulfillment of all obligations to our advertisers and counterparties.
[via lofficiel russia@facebook]

__________________
 
11-09-2010
  162
Ère de ℳodernité
 
Thefrenchy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Paris.
Gender: homme
Posts: 11,371
I was just reading an article about Xavier ROMATET, CEO of Conde Nast France and he said that their turnover (is it the correct word) this year should be of 80 million euros. The most interesting was that he said they may launch a new magazine in 2012, and that the name of the mag will be revealed in the next 18 months.

I wouldn't be surprised if they chose to do a French version of Vanity Fair. I remember reading, back in 2008, that they hesitated between releasing GQ or Vanity Fair. And turns out they chose GQ; but maybe that'll be VF's turns this time... Could also be W...

__________________
> MY INSTAGRAM
 
11-09-2010
  163
V.I.P.
 
tentalicious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Italia
Gender: homme
Posts: 6,507
^hope it will be W!

__________________
 
14-09-2010
  164
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,323
Kim France didn't invent Lucky It was Kate Betts & James Truman that came up with the idea for Vogue Index after being influenced by Japanese fashion magazines. Which in turn gave birth to Lucky, Cargo & Domino.

__________________
Love is what you want.

 
15-09-2010
  165
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,026
News about Conde Nast's UK iPad strategy (guardian.co.uk):

Quote:
Vogue slims down for iPad edition

Conde Nast is launching iPad apps for Vogue and Wired

The September issue of Vogue will never be the same again.

Traditionally the biggest of the year, and as hefty as a brick, in future the magazine is likely to be a waif-like half-inch thick, no matter how much advertising is packed between its glossy pages. Welcome to the iPad edition, publishing's equivalent of a size zero.

Publisher Conde Nast announced today it would launch iPad applications for the fashion bible beginning with the December issue, out next month. It will also launch an iPad app for the December issue of Wired, the technology magazine. The company has already launched a number of iPad apps for titles in the US, but this will be its first move in Britain.

The apps will be priced at virtually the same as the print editions, at £3.99, compared to £4 for the physical edition of Wired and £4.10 for Vogue. The app is priced for a single edition, which means regular buyers would need to pay £3.99 each month.

At a presentation on the publisher's digital strategy, Nicholas Coleridge, managing director of Conde Nast in the UK, said he saw no reason to discount electronic editions. "We don't want to get into selling our content cheaper on the internet," he said.

He forecast that as much as 40% of the publisher's sales could come from apps for Apple's iPad and similar devices within 15 years. The company also publishes titles including GQ, Vanity Fair and Glamour.

Last month the iPad was described by Rupert Murdoch as a "game changer" for news media.He predicted that "hundreds and hundreds of millions" of similar tablet computers will eventually be sold around the world.

Albert Read, general manager at Conde Nast, was equally lavish in his praise, saying the iPad's arrival "marks a significant shift" for the publishing industry. "We have arrived at a point where magazine publishers have before them what they have long dreamt of – an opportunity to transfer the magazine qualities of deep immersion, high resolution images, long form journalism and storytelling to a digital format," he said.

Advertisers appearing in the print editions of the two magazines will appear automatically on the iPad app. There will be a chance to include a link to advertisers' sites and a limited number will be offered the chance to augment their advertising, whether with video, slideshows or other media.

Wired has one of the most natural constituencies for an iPad app of any magazine; Conde Nast claims that 18% of its readers, a circulation of 50,000, already own a device.

Conde Nast launched its first iPhone apps in Britain in July, with the Conde Nast Traveller City Guides. The guides for Rome, New York, Barcelona and Paris are updated free of charge quarterly and include insider guides, restaurant reviews and a function to call and make a reservation, as well as GPS to get you to the door. The publisher is developing iPhone apps for GQ and Brides, which will be launched at the end of the year.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
 
Closed Thread
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
#2, 2010, 2013, august, business, magazines, march
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:40 AM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.