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17-03-2012
  631
fashion icon
 
Cicciolina's Avatar
 
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I'm surprised that Lucy Yeomans left, but she had been there so long that she needs to have a new challenge. I suppose.

Hey, maybe Amanda Brooks will take her position :p (said semi in jest).

 
 
21-03-2012
  632
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
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Gallagher's Paper Collectibles Re-Opens in New York

Gallagher’s offers a rotating selection
from a 1 million-volume library.


Quote:
NEW YORK — When the legendary Gallagher’s Paper Collectibles shuttered its East Village doors in 2008 due to escalating rents, founder Michael Gallagher semiretired to the Catskills with his million-plus library of vintage fashion magazines, books and photography prints. He stored his unparalleled collection of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Town & Country, Flair and more arcane titles — some dating back to the 1860s — on a property he dubbed Fashion Farm in Greenville, N.Y.

Now Gallagher’s is back, reopening today in a sleek new space at 12 Mercer Street. The shop will offer a small sliver of Gallagher’s archives, with the rest available by special order. The space is located adjacent to the offices of VFiles, an online social networking site launching in April that is a partnership between V magazine and former V executive editor Julie Anne Quay.

“We are in the middle of building VFiles and we were looking for incredible content and Mike has the biggest collection anywhere of fashion magazines and photographs and paraphernalia,” said Quay. VFiles brokered a deal to incorporate Gallagher’s material onto the new digital site, as well as open the retail space, which revives a New York institution.

Gallagher’s first opened in the late Eighties and became known for drawing the cream of the fashion world to its basement bunker. Steven Meisel, Anna Sui, John Galliano and Donna Karan were regular customers. As his reputation grew, Gallagher curated entire fashion libraries of magazines and books for the likes of Karl Lagerfeld and Marc Jacobs. He recalled Catherine Deneuve sitting among his aisles, perusing old titles.

Along the way, Gallagher — a sociable former child actor and model — befriended many in the fashion world. The late New York Times fashion editor and Old Navy pitchwoman Carrie Donovan bequeathed much of her library to him, as did Costume Institute curator Richard Martin. He was close to Richard Avedon, Francesco Scavullo and Henri Cartier-Bresson, who gave him reign to dig through their basements and archives.

“I met everybody. It was a family. There were only, like, 200 people working in fashion back then,” recalled Gallagher, who buys continuously at flea markets, estate sales and online.

In the light, airy new shop on Mercer Street, there are neat stacks of the usual suspects like international editions of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar from various decades, as well as specialty titles such as Versace: The Magazine, Wet and Actuel. There are also old issues of Spy and a curious magazine called Teens’ and Boys’ Outfitters, which dates to 1968.

An 1865 issue of Harper’s Bazaar, in newspaper format, can be had for about $100. “They’re actually not that rare. What’s rare is the Twenties and the Art Deco years,” explained Gallagher, adding that eBay and the Internet have driven up prices. “Now there’s vicious, vicious competition. Fashion really sells.”
source | wwd.com

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23-03-2012
  633
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A Bit More About Carine Roitfeld's New Magazine
Quote:
A BIT MORE FROM CARINE: Carine Roitfeld, in Tokyo for various Chanel festivities, said she is flying to New York today to work on the September launch of her new magazine. Although she couldn’t be pressed on the name, she said it will come out twice a year and resemble a book. There will be no “front of the book” section and its emphasis will be “fashion with a lot of freedom.”
wwd.com

 
27-03-2012
  634
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
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I wonder if the supplement is merely a vehicle for the model contest, or something that'll evolve into a proper magazine of its own (vogue.co.uk)

Quote:
TEEN TATLER, a supplement set to be published alongside Tatler magazine in September this year, is also launching a new model competition in association with Storm Model Management.

The magazine is searching for boys or girls aged 16 to 19 to be the face of Teen Tatler and, as well as appearing on the cover, the winner will also have the chance to be secure a contract with one of the fashion industry's most famous model agencies, Storm - which represents models including Kate Moss, Lily Donaldson and Jourdan Dunn.

"I still love the discovery of new faces and this is such an integral part of what I do, so working with Tatler to find new faces is both great fun and important," Storm Model Management founder, and member of the competition's judging panel, Sarah Doukas said. "I have a feeling that we are going to be mentoring some incredible boys and girls, discovered as a direct result of this competition."

Joining Doukas on the judging panel are designer Mark Fast and Tatler editor Kate Reardon.

"Our search to find the face of Teen Tatler is all about unearthing some of Britain's hidden youthful gorgeousness," Reardon said. "Tatler has a long history of spotting stars in virtual infancy, now we're rummaging around for even more."

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27-03-2012
  635
don't look down
 
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Thrilling talk about page display, but this is the sort of mundane stuff that someone has to solve behind-the-scenes in order to bring the glossy dream to the reader... but sometimes solving the technical problems is more satisfying than seeing the end result (wbir.com):

Quote:
Why do magazines look so bad on the new iPad?

By Lauren Indvik, Mashable

(Mashable) -- As with any high-profile product release, Apple's new iPad device has been peppered with complaints since reaching consumers' hands on March 16. Among them: that magazines look terrible on the iPad 3's high-resolution display.

The complaints were first brought to light by Tumblr blogger Jamie Billett. He pointed out that in the New Yorker's iPad app, the text on some pages is rendered as HTML, and the text on other pages is rendered as an image (.png) file.

The latter pages now appear "badly aliased" -- i.e. conspicuously pixelated -- throughout the app because the images haven't been formatted to accommodate the iPad 3's 2048 x 1536-pixel resolution, he complains. (The iPad 2, by comparison, has a resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels.)

The New Yorker and other Conde Nast title have taken the heat for looking poor under the new display, but they're not alone. Titles from other magazine publishers -- we looked at Time magazine and Sports Illustrated from Time Inc., and at Esquire and O: The Oprah Magazine from Hearst -- all suffered from the same problems.

The only exception? Vogue, which launched its iPad edition the same day the iPad 3 hit stores. The title planned its debut in conjunction with the tablet's release, and thus was able to optimize for the iPad's "retina display" ahead of time, a Conde Nast spokesperson told us.

The spokesperson added that the company is "working to optimize the rest of our digital edition portfolio over the next few weeks."

But what will the 'optimization' process entail? How much will it increase file sizes? (We noticed, for instance, that Vogue's premiere issue was a full 408 megabytes on the iPad 3, and less than 300 on the iPad 2.)

We spoke with Zeke Koch, senior director of product management of Adobe's digital publishing arm, to find out. Adobe's software powers all of Conde Nast's editions for tablets.

Magazine publishers who use Adobe's software all begin with InDesign to develop layouts, Koch explained. Those layouts can then be exported in three different kinds of formats: as images (.png or .jpg), PDF or HTML.

Different kinds of files -- images, for instance, or video and audio files -- are embedded within those larger file types.

Since magazines began publishing on tablets, "virtually all" publishers have chosen to export their digital editions as PNG (.png) files, Koch said. "The primary reason they did that is because the fidelity is perfect.

What you see on the desktop when you're designing is exactly what you see on the iPad when you're finished. Images are the fastest thing to load, and if you're trying to create a quick, effortless browsing experience, images are the way to do that," he explained.

"That was okay when there was only one screen size -- when you were just working with the iPad 1 and 2," he added. "When the iPad 3 came out, you were now dealing with a device with four times as many pixels."

The iPad 3 applies an anti-aliasing filter to all low-resolution content, which blurs images ever so slightly. As a result, photographs still look about the same on the iPad 3, but the text looks a lot worse -- i.e., visibly blurry, or pixelated.

What Vogue did -- and what all other titles will have to do in the coming weeks -- is begin exporting their digital editions as PDFs, said Koch.

But what about file size? I pointed out to Koch that Vogue was nearly as large as Wired's first issue for the original iPad. Unfortunately, he said, magazine files will be larger for iPad 3 readers because the image and video files need to be delivered at a higher resolution.

Owners of first and second-generation iPads will still be able to download smaller, lower-resolution files, however. A magazine that is around 400 megabytes on the iPad 3 will be around 280 megabytes on the iPad 1 and 2, Koch said.

But why not render in HTML? I asked Koch. Wouldn't that make the files smaller, and give readers the added benefit of selectable text?

Koch claimed that publishing in HTML wouldn't substantially reduce the file sizes. "In both cases, you have a bunch of words, and descriptions of where things should be, and multimedia. Those multimedia files are still the same size."

He said the big disadvantage with HTML is that it's "not very good at layout out things predictably and perfectly." Rather, it's optimal for helping people create content that will adapt to any size screen.

Ultimately, however, Koch believes most publishers will move to HTML as standards improve and as publishers move to publish on a wider range of tablets.

So there you have it. Magazine readers need not despair about the appearances of their magazines for too much longer, as publishers are working to optimize their editions. The fix is relatively simple: publishers will have to increase the resolution of their image and video files, and export their digital editions as PDFs.

iPad 3 owners will have to suffer longer download times, and won't be able to store as many magazines on their devices as iPad 1 and 2 owners, but that's the price one pays for a visually stunning reading experience, no?

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27-03-2012
  636
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Just like e-books, I find the idea of digital magazines absolutely awful. A nice fashion magazine is something with a soul, something you can collect. You enjoy flicking through it and putting it back on the shelf, you enjoy the different paper when there is, it's something very special. Reading it on an i-Pad will never bring all that.

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28-03-2012
  637
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^ Amen.

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28-03-2012
  638
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I don't foresee digital versions of magazines ever taking over print publications. E-books have been quite successful, but magazines (fashion to be exact) are a different story. I can not name one successful and known online-based only publication (fashion-wise). Will the print industry die? I predict no. Will it shrink? Yes. I purchase a handful of magazines each month and I believe there are enough of us, that appreciate a tangible object over something digitized, to sustain the industry (hopefully). I want to physically own the images, advertisements, and articles. Digital publications create another wall between the content and the reader. I personally do not like that disconnection.

 
29-03-2012
  639
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thefrenchy View Post
Just like e-books, I find the idea of digital magazines absolutely awful. A nice fashion magazine is something with a soul, something you can collect. You enjoy flicking through it and putting it back on the shelf, you enjoy the different paper when there is, it's something very special. Reading it on an i-Pad will never bring all that.
I agree, the only good thing is that you can easier access it when away, or take it with you, but the actual print issue will always be better in my eyes as well.

 
29-03-2012
  640
I don't know
 
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I agree with everyone here. The access is nice but somehow e-books don't feel real the way books and magazines do. They feel temporary, not something one can collect and dig up even 5 years later..

 
29-03-2012
  641
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I haven't abandoned print magazines in favour of the internet, I don't buy them so often these days because so much of the content is a diluted reinteration of everything that's gone before, with nothing worthwhile being added to the mix.

Yes, of course, fashion will eat itself and constantly churn out new variations of the same old things, but it also feels like the soul has gone out of much of the fashion magazine industry, a missing sense of personal vision and artistic experimentation which used to counterbalance the commercial side, and create a more satisfying blend of content that would sustain a second look, years down the line.

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05-04-2012
  642
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^^ Which is perhaps why more people are getting into independent mags and/or international titles from newer publishers/non-traditional markets. Some imo have a more curated feel and though they deal with more or less the same themes, it's nice to see how they're interpreted.

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06-04-2012
  643
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GivenchyHomme's Avatar
 
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Vogue Paris to be published in english?
Quote:
France gave the US the Statue of Liberty, now we are taking Vogue.fr to the wider world... get ready for #VogueParisinEnglish
https://twitter.com/#!/VogueParis/st...75105376378883

 
06-04-2012
  644
scenester
 
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Amazing news!

 
06-04-2012
  645
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Website? Or the magazine? Or both?

 
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