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28-05-2010
  76
trendsetter
 
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Here's the answer to my question...

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SPEAKING OF WACKERMANN’S WARD…: Over at W, the business operations of which also fall under Bill Wackermann’s purview, new editor in chief Stefano Tonchi has hired Joseph Logan, most recently design director at Artforum and senior art director at Baron & Baron, to be the magazine’s new design director, effective Tuesday. Logan, 38, succeeds W’s longtime group design director, Edward Leida, who was shown the door soon after Tonchi came into power. Logan — who has also worked at French Vogue and Arena Homme Plus — will report to W’s new creative director, Jody Quon. In a conversation with Tonchi and Quon, Logan told WWD, “What we’ve talked about is making something extremely refined and something in line with, or maybe built around, the interests of the first W that existed under Mr. Fairchild.

“I think we want to make [the design] bold and yet have a kind of classic beauty to it,” Logan added. “But it’s really going to be about the imagery. I think the design is always in the service of the imagery.” As for the white space that has defined W’s look and historically dominated the front of book, Logan said: “I think there will be white space when it works, but it really depends on the imagery.”

Added Quon: “I think the front will probably be a place where we’ll flex our muscles a little more than they’ve done so in the past.” While Tonchi is putting his mark on the August issue (among other things, he selected the cover stars, Jon Hamm and Rebecca Hall), Quon and Logan will be starting in on the September issue, which will be Tonchi’s first full effort. No pressure or anything.

— N.A.
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30-05-2010
  77
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Here's part of a personal account of what life was like after she stopped being an editor. It's a long article, the link to the full story is below (observer.co.uk):

Quote:
Dominique Browning: How I lost my job and found myself

For more than a decade, she was a high-flying magazine editor. Then one Monday, the title closed and she found herself out of a job, single and feeling anxious, listless, and strangely hungry. One woman's honest and provocative account of building a new life from the ruins



For 12 years, I had a job I loved as the editor of the US edition of House & Garden, a magazine that celebrated the good life. It would be an understatement to describe this enterprise as part of a company not primarily in the business of philosophical, spiritual or moral soul-searching. Condé Nast's roots and branches are in the material world. The good life at House & Garden generally meant cultivating your own backyard rather than being involved in the body politic. I pushed against the limits of making a so-called shelter magazine by publishing articles about spiritual issues and the environment, but I always felt clear-eyed about how things stood. I spent more than a decade in the belly of the beast of muchness and more. That was a precarious place to be when the property bubble began to leak.

The folding of the magazine was ruthless. Without warning, our world collapsed. No one was expecting it: I came to work on a Monday in 2007, went to the corporate offices for a meeting, had a different meeting, got the news and was told to have everything packed up by Friday. Security guards were immediately posted by the doors.

In the four days we were given to pack up our belongings, I was overwhelmed with an urge to hoard, and began stuffing every House & Garden paper bag, pencil and notepad I could get my hands on into a box, so that I'd never run out of office supplies. I salvaged enough to run a small corporation from my kitchen. I didn't think of this as stealing. I thought of it as a twisted sort of recycling – part of the strange new economy of severance into which I had been thrown. Everything with our logo on it was destined for the dustbin anyway.

Even so, a few weeks later I realised I had some gaping holes in the inventory: I had no ink for my printer. The pages of my résumé looked faded, ghostly. You would think I was fading, too, but I wasn't. I was getting plump. All I could think about was food. This was the beginning of being hungry all the time. My addled brain interpreted the white noise of unemployment to mean that I was going into hibernation, that I had to lay in reserves. After the closing of the magazine was announced, my public line was, "We had a great run, we took a magazine from zero to 950,000 readers in 10 years, fabulous renewals, we won awards, published six books…" I was a zombie. "Great run… 950,000 readers… six books…"

But privately, I was in a whiplashing tailspin. My nightmare had finally come true. For years, I had a profound dread of unemployment that went way beyond worrying about how to pay the bills. I would like to say that this was because of the insecure nature of magazine publishing, but my anxiety had more to do with my own neuroses – though I didn't think of it that way. Work had become the scaffolding of my life. It was what I counted on. It held up the floor of my moods, kept the facade intact. I always worried that if I didn't have work, I would sink into abject torpor.

I have always had a job. I have always supported myself. Everything I own I purchased with money that I earnt. I worked hard. For the 35 years I've been an adult, I have had an office to go to and a time to show up there. I've always had a place to be, existential gravitas intended. Without work, who was I? I do not mean that my title defined me. What did define me was the simple act of working. The loss of my job triggered a cascade of self-doubt and depression. I felt like a failure. Not that the magazine had failed – that I had.

The thing about running a magazine is that there is always too much to do. I liked not being in control of my time – I was always busy. I didn't want time to think things over, things like feeling guilty about spending more time with my office mates than with my children; feeling sad that those children were leaving home; or feeling disappointed in love or frightened by terrible illness. Everything else, in other words. The demands of my job kept me distracted. Besides, no one else was paying my mortgage. With the closing of the magazine, my beloved family of colleagues was obliterated. And so was the structure of my life.

Within hours of leaving my office for the last time, I could hardly bring myself to care about my reputation. I just wanted to eat. I began calling every employed person I knew to take me to lunch. I wanted to fill my calendar with the promise of meals. Only food could ward off the rage, despair and raw fear that overcame me.

How had I managed to get this far in my life completely unprepared for the unknown – which I had always known was out there?
http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2010...ter-redundancy

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06-06-2010
  78
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Quote:
WHAT’S TAKING SO LONG?: Two weeks ago, The New York Times was thought to be close to naming a new editor in chief for T, its Sunday style supplement, which has been editor-less since Stefano Tonchi jumped to W in April. The Times had said it hoped to find a replacement by May 1, and Anne Christensen, the magazine’s women’s fashion director, was considered the frontrunner for the job. But there has yet to be an announcement and, since then, the rumor mill has continued to grind. Among the names being bandied about in media circles — regardless of their basis in reality — are Christensen, as well as GQ’s deputy editor Michael Hainey, the Times’ own Guy Trebay, Kate Betts, Ingrid Sischy and Vogue’s Sally Singer, who is said to have possibly tossed her hat back into the ring (though remaining ambivalent about leaving her high-paying gig, according to sources). As it no doubt is for Singer, money would likely be a sticking point for Hainey, a 10-year veteran of the Condé Nast-owned men’s title. And while insiders say Trebay has been lobbying for the position, he seems an unlikely option, as he lacks the management experience and stronger-than-strong advertiser ties the gig requires. (In addition to his editorial responsibilities, Tonchi acted as a de facto publisher of T). Insiders say Betts is not interested, and with regard to the former Interview editor, a well-placed source said Sischy wouldn’t be interested, either — she is enjoying her freelance writing assignments as well as the large canvas she has as international editor for Vanity Fair’s Italian and Spanish editions, and Russian and German Vogue. One thing the Times has on its side here is time — the next issue of T, the fall women’s fashion issue, does not come out until Aug. 22. Still, all indications are Christensen remains the frontrunner. The Times did not return e-mails seeking comment.
wwd.com

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06-06-2010
  79
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Quote:
Given the beleaguered print world these days, more journalists and executives have been hooking their stars to the digital world. Well, Elle and parent company Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S. have reversed the trend — luring someone from the tech sector to succeed Carol Smith, the magazine’s former senior vice president and chief brand officer, who decamped in April to Condé Nast. Effective July 5, Robin Domeniconi, who had been vice president of U.S. advertising sales, marketing and publishing for Microsoft, will step into Smith’s shoes, Alain Lemarchand, Hachette’s U.S. president and chief executive officer, said Friday. “[Robin’s] knowledge of the digital space and her clear ability to grow the business on all platforms will be a great asset to the Elle group,” he said. Lemarchand might also have mentioned that Domeniconi, whose name will also sit atop Margaret Russell’s at Elle Décor, will need to buoy the print side and fast; Elle trailed behind InStyle and Vogue in ad pages during the first half of 2010. (Under Smith, Elle finished 2009 with more ad pages than Vogue — considered a major feat, although their page rates are certainly different.) It makes sense, then, that one of Domeniconi’s first assignments is to hire a vice president, brand publisher, which she told WWD she plans to accomplish in two to four weeks. (In this respect, the company seemingly reworked its initial hiring plan, which was said to involve finding a publisher first and filling the higher-up brand-officer position after that.)

During her year and a half at Microsoft, Domeniconi oversaw sales and marketing for the company’s media properties and partners, such as MSN, Windows Live, Xbox Live, Live Search, Facebook and WSJ Digital. She was also involved in the recent launch of the women’s lifestyle Web site Glo.com — a collaboration between MSN, Hachette and BermanBraun. (Lemarchand said Domeniconi “will continue her strong connection” to Glo.com in her new role at Elle.) Prior to joining Microsoft in November 2008, Domeniconi was a senior adviser at Avista Capital Partners, and, before that, president of Time Inc.’s Media Group and the president and publisher of Real Simple from 1999 to 2005.

“I have such a passion for building brands,” Domeniconi told WWD,” and when I was working on Glo, it ignited my passions again [and made me] want to get back to building brands from a content and an audience perspective — I was missing that at the last several jobs I had.” In terms of new revenue streams, Domeniconi said she was interested in exploring product licensing deals, pointing to Elle’s clothing line at Kohl’s and a new agreement with the chain for an Elle Décor product range as examples. “It could be digital, it could be television shows, it could be product,” she noted. “Basically, wherever we see the brand holding true to its mission and [where it] makes sense on other platforms and in other products,” including on the iPad, online and on mobile devices. (She added, somewhat cryptically, “I already, in my mind, have a place where I think we would like to go first…another area of technology that I don’t think has been exploited yet by brands such as Elle,” though she declined further clarification.)

Like her predecessor, Domeniconi will have oversight of all content, advertising, digital platforms and brand development within the Elle group — which means Elle’s editor in chief, Robbie Myers, will report to Domeniconi just like she did to Smith. However, Domeniconi said she won’t be giving orders but rather will look to Myers as a keeper of the Elle brand — but, then again, she hasn’t taken control yet. “She has a very clear and powerful vision of Elle’s editorial voice on all platforms,” Domeniconi said of Myers, “and while, yes, my name will be above hers on the masthead, she is absolutely the brand steward. She knows, she lives, she breathes this brand...[and] there are a number of ways that we’ll work as partners.” (Smith might not have viewed it that way.)

In the next few months, all eyes will certainly be focused on Elle, as the title looks to its 25th anniversary in the U.S. this fall, leaving little room for a learning curve. Indeed, the debut of Elle’s iPad edition and the release of the Joe Zee-edited coffee-table book, tentatively titled “The Ellements of Style,” are both pegged to the October anniversary issue.

Meanwhile, Anne Welch, who was Smith’s number two and had been acting chief brand officer since Smith’s departure, has been named vice president, brand operations.
wwd.com

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08-06-2010
  80
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Breaking news!

http://twitter.com/derekblasberg/status/15716347563

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08-06-2010
  81
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^that is major!

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08-06-2010
  82
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Quote:
June 8, 2010, 12:20 pm
Sally Singer Named Editor of T Magazine
By JOSEPH PLAMBECK

Sally Singer, the fashion news and features director at Vogue, has been named the editor of T: The New York Times Style Magazine.

Ms. Singer, 45, will take over on July 5, according to a note Bill Keller, executive editor of The Times, sent to staff on Tuesday.

The move essentially completes a swap of editors between The Times and Condé Nast, the publisher of Vogue. The T job opened up after its first editor, Stefano Tonchi, moved to another Condé Nast fashion magazine, W, in April.

Ms. Singer worked in a variety of roles for different publications before joining Vogue in 1999. Her stops have included a stint as fashion director at New York Magazine and as an editor at the London Review of Books, and she has written for The Economist and The Atlantic Monthly. She studied at the University of California at Berkeley and Yale.

“As her resume — and her successes at Vogue — will testify, she has the combination of aesthetic sense and intellectual curiosity suited to a style magazine that wears the name of The New York Times,” Mr. Keller said in the note.

T made its debut in 2003, and now comes out 15 times each year, with most issues dedicated to either women’s or men’s fashion, travel or design.

Like other luxury titles (and most magazines in general), it experienced a sharp drop in advertisements last year. Some of those ad pages have returned this year.

The paper had originally said that they hoped to name Mr. Tonchi’s successor by May 1. Mr. Keller said that the paper “considered a wide range of impressive candidates,” both inside and outside The Times.

While an important player at Vogue, Ms. Singer didn’t produce the kind of outsized reputation of other editors there, including Anna Wintour and Andre Leon Talley.

“We were looking for someone with the imagination and taste to envision the next generation of this extraordinary franchise, and the experience to make it happen,” Mr. Keller said.
nytimes.com

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08-06-2010
  83
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Now that is really interesting...I'm curious to see how the whole magazine will look under Sally.

 
09-06-2010
  84
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Another iPad issue : Love Magazine #4

Quote:
We also hear that the next venture is to make LOVE Magazine issue 4 iPad ready.
ftape.com

 
09-06-2010
  85
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Quote:
FROM TIMES SQUARE TO THE TIMES: Bye, Anna, hello, Bill. Sally Singer said as much Tuesday morning when The New York Times confirmed the Vogue fashion news/features director would be the next editor in chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, effective July 5. The Times’ announcement put an end to weeks of speculation about who would take over the Sunday style supplement, which has been functioning without a chief since late March when founding editor Stefano Tonchi was tapped by Condé Nast to rehabilitate W magazine. The drawn-out and secretive hiring process made for rampant rumors and misconceptions, even from those being considered for the job, such as T’s own Anne Christensen, who in the final last few weeks is said to have believed she had a lock on the job, and Guy Trebay, who sources said also lobbied heavily for the post. In a strange unfolding of events, Christensen was out of the office when the Times staffers were told the news, according to sources. Equally curious, George Gene Gustines, T’s managing editor, wasn’t there either — he was on vacation.

Insiders say Singer, whose candidacy was first reported by WWD, vacillated for some time between taking the plunge and accepting the T gig and staying at the cushier — and probably higher paying — environs of Vogue, her professional home for over a decade. (Prior to joining the title in 1999, she was fashion director at New York magazine and also spent time at Elle and British Vogue.) Her indecision goes some of the way in explaining away the month-long delay in naming a successor for Tonchi — some sources point to possible impending upper-level management changes at the Times Magazine as a contributing factor.

Asked what spurred her move, Singer told WWD, “It seemed like the right time to have a new challenge — and Bill Keller [the Times’ executive editor] is very persuasive,” but noted it was a “wrenching” decision to make. “I’m a very loyal person and I don’t make moves easily,” she said. (Though she declined to discuss salary, Singer emphasized her “deliberations about this job were not about practical terms. It was entirely emotional. It’s going from one job I love to another place that I love but don’t know as well.”) Singer also spoke of the excitement she felt about following in the footsteps of past Times Magazine style editors including Carrie Donovan and her predecessor Tonchi, who expressed a mutual admiration when reached for comment. “I think she’s one of the smartest people in New York,” he said of Singer. “I could not imagine better hands for my T, or a better brain.” (Interestingly, one source said Singer had been up for the T editor in chief gig when it launched in 2003 before Tonchi was chosen.)

For those wondering how the news hit Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour, by Tuesday afternoon she’d already filled Singer’s slot by promoting Eve MacSweeney and Mark Holgate to features director and fashion news director, respectively. Via her spokesman, Wintour offered: “I am very happy for Sally and I know that she is going to do amazing things at T. I am also looking forward to continuing to work closely with both Eve and Mark, each of whom brings a great deal of talent to Vogue.”

While Singer — considered to be more of an intellectual than a straight fashion person by her colleagues — was mum on her vision for the multisubject T, she did say, “I wasn’t hired by Bill Keller to bring Vogue to T. I was hired by Bill Keller to do T, so it’s a different project.” She later allowed, “I imagine at some point it will naturally evolve into something that reflects more my taste and concerns than those of my predecessor. But hopefully that will be an organic process and not an imposition.” — Nick Axelrod
Quote:
MORE CHANGES AT W: While Stefano Tonchi’s first few months at the helm of W have been relatively quiet on the h.r. front (most of the cuts of upper-level editors in the Patrick McCarthy era were decided before he came on board), it looks like the next few weeks will be a bit more gruesome, if Tuesday’s round of job cuts is any indication. In all, six staffers were let go, including the magazine’s longtime deputy editor Julie L. Belcove, who is being succeeded by a Tonchi-approved executive editor, Ted Moncreiff. Moncreiff comes to W from Newsweek, where he was executive editor; prior to joining Newsweek, he spent 15 years at Condé Nast Traveler, the last four as executive editor. Tonchi told WWD that Moncreiff, who begins June 21, will oversee features for the magazine, with an emphasis on assigning stories and editing, which is something, Tonchi said, “I value very much.” He added that Moncreiff comes with “a Rolodex of writers that will be very interesting for the new W.” Sources believe there are more layoffs — and, hopefully, a few hires — to come as Tonchi and Co. start in on the hotly anticipated September issue. — N.A.
Quote:
IT’S A RAID: Stephen Drucker has raided Condé Nast yet again to reinvigorate Town & Country. Hanya Yanagihara, former deputy editor at Condé Nast Traveler, has joined Town & Country as executive editor. She succeeds John Cantrell, who has worked at the Hearst title for the past 25 years and is leaving the publication. Yanagihara’s appointment marks the second time he’s pillaged the hallways of 4 Times Square for talent; a few weeks ago, he tapped William Norwich from Vogue to become special correspondent covering social and cultural trends and oversee the people and parties coverage. — Amy Wicks
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09-06-2010
  86
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Quote:
Changes at Vogue
by Nick Axelrod

Posted Tuesday June 8, 2010
From WWD.COM

It didn't take long for Anna Wintour to fill Sally Singer's shoes once news broke of her defection to T: The New York Times Style Magazine Tuesday morning. Within several hours, Wintour promoted two staffers - Eve MacSweeney and Mark Holgate - to succeed Singer, who had been in charge of both fashion news and features at Vogue. MacSweeney, currently associate editor, will become features director; Holgate, currently senior fashion writer, will be bumped to fashion news director.
Quote:
Patrick O'Connell Says Goodbye to Vogue
by Marc Karimzadeh

Posted Wednesday June 9, 2010
From WWD.COM

After 12 years, Patrick O' Connell, Vogue's director of communications, is leaving the magazine. He handed in his resignation last week, and is expected to stay on until a successor is named.

"It's been an incredible 12 years at the top of the game, and an experience I wouldn't trade for the world," O'Connell said. "It's just simply time for a personal change."

O'Connell has played an instrumental role as a spokesman for the magazine and its editor in chief, Anna Wintour, from the inception of the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund to the Costume Institute benefit, "The September Issue" documentary and thornier moments such as "The Devil Wears Prada" and "Front Row," the unauthorized biography on Wintour.

O' Connell will be looking to stay in communications in areas that encompass community relations, development work and corporate philanthropy.
wwd.com

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Last edited by Flashbang; 09-06-2010 at 12:01 PM.
 
15-06-2010
  87
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Some magazine news from Russia.

Quote:
Elle : the most popular fashion-magazine in Russia

As a result of recent research company TNS Russia monthly audience of the magazine ELLE in Russia reached 730,940 people, which is the highest among audiences of all fashion magazines in Russia (NRS-Russia, December 2009 - April 2010).

Company executives and independent experts have attributed the rapid growth of the audience ELLE with the successful restart of the journal, its quality upgrading, and extensive advertising campaign, which ID HFS / IMG spends the autumn of last year.

"In just eight months the new team was able to completely transform ELLE magazine, make it a truly progressive and trendy, which proves the stable positive dynamics in readership over the past 3-wave measurements - says publishers of ELLE magazine Natalia Shkuleva. - But we're not going complacency. The changes continue to occur each month. Our fashion revolution has just begun! "

Thus, today ELLE was the leading fashion magazines in Moscow and in Russia. Most readers in Moscow (215,970 people). ELLE also prefer other players fashionable segment.

It is important to note that the growth audience ELLE by 19% much faster than the market average segment at 6%. Editorial changes in ELLE allow not only to successfully keep the interest of loyal readers, but also attract the audience before prefer other publications.

Second place : Vogue
Third place : Marie Claire
Fourth place : L'Officiel
Fifth place : Harper's Bazaar
glossy.ru

 
16-06-2010
  88
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Quote:
The Guardian
Is this the perfect magazine cover girl?
Glossy magazine editors agonise over who to put on the front. But they all know what really sells best

Imogen Fox
Wednesday 16 June 2010 20.00 BST

The perfect cover girl – Cheryl Cole. Photograph: David Fisher/Rex Features

Could it be that the vision of Cheryl Cole with tawny hair and wearing a pink and not-too-fashiony dress, in possession of a strong yet friendly gaze and medium- sized breasts, makes the most compelling case for a woman to part with £4? And is Victoria Beckham, walking purposefully in a non-black outfit with visible bag and shoes, reason enough to leave a newsagents £1.95 poorer? The editors of Vogue and Grazia respectively would guess as much.

The question as to what makes the perfect cover girl is one over which glossy magazine editors agonise long and hard. Get it right and circulation figures spike; get it wrong and an editor is left nervously twiddling her leopard-print Louis Vuitton scarf for comfort. To help them decide on their ideal cover, they regularly consult focus groups, circulation figures and surveys.

Choosing a cover girl is far from an exact science: what works one month might not the next. Alexandra Shulman, editor of British Vogue, says: "It's difficult to say what will sell. Kate Moss sells well for us but then we tend to play to our strengths and put her on the September cover – it's better to use your ammunition on a big issue rather than battling against a difficult seasonal situation." But even the wide-eyed rock chick from Croydon isn't entirely reliable. The May 2003 issue where Kate was made up to look like David Bowie's iconic Aladdin Sane cover was, according to Shulman, "a complete catastrophe".

To add to the cover conundrum, glossy magazine editors aren't always appealing to their core readers. The thinking is that since loyal readers will buy Vogue anyway, the floating reader needs a very particular type of cover bait. Although Vogue routinely features the most avant-garde of clothes in its shoots, its cover girl is unlikely to be wearing a padded Balenciaga top, "a real thumbs down" according to Shulman. Dirty colours such as mustard and aubergine don't work; even an innocuous green can be tricky. Simple, pretty colours such as pink work best: metallic clothes sell, but black is a no-no.

When it comes to skin colour, the cover girl ideal is shamefully narrow. "The evidence suggests that black cover girls don't sell as well as white cover girls," admits Shulman, depressingly.

Hair is one of the trickiest ingredients, as anyone who remembers the hoo-ha over Sienna Miller's "unruly" (read limp and British) hair in the US Vogue documentary, The September Issue, will attest to. Redheads just don't sell, black hair is "extremely difficult", extreme blonde is risky, while tawny hair gets the newsagents' tills ringing – for Vogue at least.

But not all editors live by such strict cover-hair diktats. Jo Elvin, editor of Glamour, dismisses the theory that tawny hair sells. "If we have a dark-haired girl on the cover, I don't think, 'Oh, we need a blonde.' Our cover sales are driven by a cover star who has something to say." So who has the most sellable opinions? Cheryl Cole being frank about her failed relationship with Ashley. "She's the new Diana in terms of sales," admits Elvin.

Over at weekly title Grazia it is timing that is crucial. Heather Mills worked as a cover girl during her divorce drama, although editor Jane Bruton is keen to stress that she wouldn't work at any other time. Kate Moss can work one week, Lady Gaga another. The celebrity must be moving because it suits the pacy feel of the magazine, ideally wearing something bright, showing a bit of emotion and a lot of handbag. "If there is a beautiful Hollywood blue sky in the background, I cheer inside," says Bruton.

There is a certain amount of cover- girl consensus, however. A trio of women – Cheryl Cole, Alexa Chung and Kate Moss – consistently top the ideal-cover league. If they are wearing something safe, with their hair at its most tawny, then this triumvirate of perfected girls next door – "hometown girls" as Shulman has it – are circulation gold dust.

What does this say about the magazine-buying public? Are we infinitely conservative or just not given much choice? Is the quest for the perfect cover girl in fact a self-perpetuating concept: Moss is put on the biggest-selling issue because she sells well. Surely it can't be as bald and depressing a fact as we simply like seeing Cheryl Cole wearing a pink dress, can it?
guardian.co.uk

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Last edited by sethii; 16-06-2010 at 08:58 PM.
 
17-06-2010
  89
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^A depressing read.

Things seems to be changing at American Vogue lately...

 
18-06-2010
  90
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Quote:
W Shakeups: Team Tonchi continued to take shape at W Thursday when the magazine dismissed market director Treena Lombardo and well-respected accessories and jewelry director Brooke Magnaghi, and hired Karla Martinez away from Interview to fill both spots. “I wanted to centralize the way we are covering the fashion market,” new editor in chief Stefano Tonchi said. He added that Martinez will work closely with fashion director Alex White to present a “unity of vision.”

“I think we should be set,” Tonchi said when asked if there would be further staff turnover. Martinez, whose official title will be fashion market director, continues Tonchi’s trend of stocking the editorial pool with familiar faces from his prior post as editor of T: The New York Times Style Magazine. Before joining Interview last August, Martinez served as market director at T. Tonchi previously lured issue editor Armand Limnander and editor at large Lynn Hirschberg away from the Times.
Quote:
UP A STEP: Teen Vogue has promoted Sabine Feldmann, associate publisher, advertising, to vice president and publisher of the title. Feldmann joined Condé Nast in April from Shape magazine, where she served as chief brand officer, vice president and publisher.
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HEADING BACK HOME: Tina Gaudoin, editor in chief of The Wall Street Journal’s glossy luxury play WSJ., is resigning “for personal reasons,” she said, and will return to London at the end of August. While “personal reasons” is often a euphemism for you-know-what, sources said in this case, the statement is accurate and involves family matters. Gaudoin’s husband has been working in London for the last year while she has remained in New York. “It was just not sustainable,” she told WWD. “It’s been a great privilege to work here and it was a hard decision for me.”

Gaudoin, who moved to New York in January 2008, will oversee the supplement’s September and October issues and will help choose her successor (get those résumés out now). She will remain on WSJ.’s masthead as a contributing editor, working with Wall Street Journal Europe editor in chief Patience Wheatcroft contributing articles to the Journal on European fashion and luxury goods.

Despite recent speculation that News Corp. honcho Rupert Murdoch wasn’t that keen on the title, Journal executives insisted the group remains committed to the supplement, a key product as the paper tries to lure more luxury advertisers (well, those that are still advertising). “WSJ. is a phenomenal success, which is why we have increased both the print run and the frequency of the magazine,” said Robert Thomson, the Journal’s managing editor. “Feedback from readers has been very positive and our plan is to continue to increase the frequency in coming years.”

The frequency of the magazine, launched in September 2008, increased by two issues this year — to six — and there have been 193 advertisers since its launch. Circulation in all the Journal’s editions in the U.S., Europe and Asia has risen to 1.6 million from 800,000.
wwd.com

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