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18-06-2010
  91
Mr. Magic
 
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Quote:
The last remaining member of the publishing old guard at Condé Nast is days away from leaving 4 Times Square for good. Vogue’s sometimes abrasive, often brash and perennially aggressive Tom Florio, who most recently served as senior vice president and publishing director, was said to be on thin ice for a while and insiders claim he almost was out of a job late last year. Now it seems the parting is amicable and Florio is headed for La La land. Or something like it — he wants to run his own show, and an announcement in the world of entertainment is said to be forthcoming. “I’m just in a position to do something else,” he told WWD, coyly adding, “It could be in TV; it could be on many platforms. It also could be that I will be working closely with Condé Nast. We’ll see.” Incidentally, not long after the formal resignation announcement, Florio was said to have met with executives at IMG.

In his current role, he oversees Vogue, Teen Vogue, Bon Appetit and Condé Nast Traveler. It wasn’t long ago that he lured Carol Smith from Elle to head up the food group. Since joining, insiders say the two have gotten along but after years as fierce competitors, there was a lot of back and forth, described by one as “like a couple bantering.”

Florio, who will leave the company at the end of June after 25 years, is best known as the driving force behind the glory days at Vogue, when the magazine’s heft required two hands and when the fashion title generated more ad pages than any monthly consumer magazine. He launched Vogue.TV and Vogue’s largest issue ever, published in September 2007, which became the subject of RJ Cutler’s documentary, “The September Issue.” But Vogue was hit like every other fashion title by the Great Recession and suffered the ignominy of losing its top perch in ad pages last year to Elle under Smith. In the first half of 2010, Vogue rebounded slightly — but clearly not enough to put Florio back on top — with ad pages up 8 percent to 987, according to Media Industry Newsletter.

Prior to Vogue, Florio was publisher of GQ. During his 25 years at the company, he’s also been president of The New Yorker and was on the launch team of Condé Nast Traveler. So will Florio be replaced in his current role? Not likely. “I would be shocked if they filled it,” said one observer.
wwd.com

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18-06-2010
  92
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Quote:
Conde Nast not replacing Tom Florio. The publishers that reported to him will now report to Chuck Townsend
twitter/jimshi809

 
21-06-2010
  93
Mr. Magic
 
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Quote:
It's so insane it just might be true! During men's fashion week in Milan, the Principe is buzzing about Anna Dello Russo...and Stefano Tonchi? Yes, really: rumors are running rampant that Tonchi is trying to woo his longtime friend (and fellow Italian magazine editrix) Dello Russo for the fashion director gig at W. Tonchi has said that he's pretty much done with layoffs, but Chic can't imagine that the legendary Alex White will stay on board when she has so many advertising clients (David Yurman) and editorial opportunites to keep her occupied. And Tonchi's W desperately needs some good press, which the international street-style obsession Dello Russo will bring in spades. Also, Dello Russo essentially hires photographers and stylists for Japanese Vogue...which someone's gotta do at W, right? (Without Dennis Freedman, who had twenty-year-old relationships with A-list photogs like Michael Thompson, Mert & Marcus, and Bruce Weber, there's a real void in that category.) It makes sense! (But it's still crazy.) We report, you decide...
dailyfrontrow

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23-06-2010
  94
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Just had a thought - it would be soooooo amazing if Vogue released a product that let you browse thier entire back catalogue of magazines on line or in pdf form.

I would pay alot of money for that.

p.s. sorry didn't know where else to post this.

 
23-06-2010
  95
flaunt the imperfection..
 
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mia- i just made a new thread that your post could go in...
http://forums.thefashionspot.com/f12...ml#post7440003


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23-06-2010
  96
tailored
 
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interesting read about lonny magazine, which was started by the same folks who did domino:

Quote:
For Interior Designers, D.I.Y. Philosophy Extends to Web Magazine

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER


NEW YORK — Die-hard do-it-yourself interior designers spend hours flipping through glossy magazines, carefully tearing out pages showing a pillow or paint color they like and filing them away for future inspiration. What do they do if their favorite print magazine folds?

Michelle Adams, 27, a former market assistant at Domino, and Patrick Cline, 34, a photographer and photo retoucher, were talking about that in May 2009 after Condé Nast closed Domino, its sprightly home magazine. Over dinner at Chili’s, they mourned the loss of the magazine and other design magazines, like Blueprint and House & Garden, and joked that they should start their own.

“People were missing all the magazines that had folded, and it was really disappointing that no one came along” with replacements, said Ms. Adams, who is also a textile designer.

They created Lonny, an online shelter magazine, which put its first issue up in October and immediately caught the attention of design circles as well as advertisers and print publishers.

Lonny looks and acts like a print magazine, not a Web site or a blog. It has pages to turn, a table of contents and full-page ads. But it offers Web-only benefits like zoomable, clickable images, so readers can inspect a lamp displayed in a photograph of someone’s living room and then click to buy it.

Many readers still like to lounge on the couch and flip through glossy pages with big stylish photos, but as mainstays like Domino and Gourmet disappear, readers are forced to look elsewhere. The Web sites of magazines like Lucky, Bon Appétit and Architectural Digest, however, are either underdeveloped or visually different from their print counterparts.

Lonny’s readership is still small — since October, 600,000 people have read it. But the interest that the low-cost magazine has generated among publishers and advertisers has implications for other image-rich print publications covering fashion, travel and food. This is especially true with the promise of new devices like the iPad that make online reading an experience more like reading in print.

On Monday, Lonny, which is based in New York, will announce that it has raised an undisclosed sum from Kristoffer Mack, an investment banker and investor in young Internet companies, and J. Christopher Burch, a venture capitalist and a founder of the fashion label Tory Burch.

“The shelter design industry is incredibly discombobulated,” Mr. Mack said. “There’s a ton of money and it’s completely unprofitable, so it seemed to be a perfect place to find highly disruptive technologies.”

Lonny is published every other month using Issuu, a Web platform where, for $19 a month, anyone can upload a PDF and instantly create an online magazine that looks like a print one.

“A Web site is continuous and constantly changing, whereas a digital publication has a start and finish, a unique purpose for that one goal,” said Astrid Sandoval, chief commercial officer for Issuu. “We want to recreate the best of the print reading experience, where people might spend three full focused hours on that, and enhance it with the digital world.”

For the first issue, Ms. Adams and Mr. Cline roped designers and magazine editors they had met in the industry into letting them photograph their homes. They spent $1,000 of their own money and borrowed Ms. Adams’s parents’ car to drive to shoots. They bartered for free photo-processing and equipment in exchange for ads.

Exhausted and assuming that Lonny would never amount to more than a hobby alongside their day jobs, they went to Paris to vacation and photograph. They woke up from a jetlagged nap to find their in-boxes full of messages from advertisers who wanted to buy ads in the second issue. They hired an ad sales representative, without meeting him in person, the same day.
Ballard Designs, the home furnishings company, was one of the first advertisers to call. It placed an ad similar to those it placed in print magazines, but offered a 15 percent discount for people who clicked on the ad.

“Typically, we have found that online advertising has not been very effective for us, but the click-throughs and the performance of the ad surprised us in the fact that it did quite well,” said James Pope, director for business development and retail at Ballard. “Lonny shows you can be online and still be a very designer-oriented, well-designed, graphical piece.”
Kate Spade, the handbag and home décor designer; Mitchell Gold, the furniture company; and One Kings Lane, the home décor private sales site, have also advertised in Lonny.

With its low-cost operation, Lonny startles people who have worked in the industry. Ms. Adams styles and edits, and Mr. Cline photographs everything. They hired an assistant who attends shoots, taking her own photos so she can learn the sources for items like sofas or chandeliers and link to them in the magazine.

Lonny added how-to videos and search to its site, so readers can search for all the bedrooms it has featured, for instance, and will let people create online scrapbooks, the digital version of the tear sheet collections hidden in design lovers’ closets.
For one of the issues, they shot the upstate New York country home of Eddie Ross, who now runs a design company and was formerly senior style editor of Martha Stewart Living.

A typical shoot for Martha Stewart required seven people and “meetings about Pantone chip colors and meetings about meetings,” Mr. Ross said. “It was just crazy, because who lives like this, in a $300,000 room I put together? I’m sorry, but I can’t relate to a $40,000 mirrored coffee table.”

Lonny displays people’s own décor, instead of shipping in items to redecorate homes, as many magazines do. In the case of Mr. Ross’s home, that meant including lamps found in a Goodwill store.

The technique infuses the magazine with the accessibility that Domino was known for. “It’s not as stiff,” Mr. Cline said. “We’ll leave lamps on and animals walking through shots.” At daylong shoots for print magazines, he used to get four usable photos. At Lonny, he typically gets 27.

No one in the industry is saying that Lonny-type magazines will save publishing. But it does provide an avenue toward electronic reading devices like the iPad. Publications often mimic what came before, said Adam L. Penenberg, a journalism professor at New York University.

But, he said, “you’ll know a new narrative form has emerged when you have to consume a particular story on an iPad to truly understand its content, and reading it on any other platform simply wouldn’t work.”
nytimes.com

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24-06-2010
  97
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The Business of Magazines thread seems to have vanished, so I'll put this here (independent.co.uk):

Quote:
Mad about the boys: Why are the glossies all about men?

You have to wonder why Cosmopolitan felt the need to publish a "sexy" issue this month. Come on – this is a magazine that has built its entire reputation around sex – under it, over it, any way you might possibly want it. It launched in the UK in 1972 on the tsunami of the so-called sexual revolution. It is renowned for emblazoning the word on its covers. Sex is Cosmo's nuts and bolts, its bedrock, its DNA. Did the editor think not enough attention was being paid to nookie?

"It's not a 'sex' issue. It's a 'sex-y' issue," points out Louise Court, who has edited the title for three and a half years. "We thought it was fun. And Cosmo isn't just about sex, even though lots of people think it is." What else is it about? "It's about celebrating life, enjoying yourself, being a good friend and not living in a cocoon," she says.

It is also about men. Much has been made of Cosmo's critical role in sex education back when nice girls wouldn't dream of discussing anal sex over their own dead bodies, never mind tea and biscuits. But decades after Cosmo set out to emancipate bored women, it is still focused on men – and is as full of them as it ever has been: there were its infamous naked centrefold shoots; now there's also a dedicated 'Man Manual' section, to instruct readers in the art of deciphering "what's really on his mind"; and this month 'The Sex and the Single Girl' and 'Sex and the Not So Single Girl' columns have been expanded to a full page each, and readers can learn that men everywhere have the same three things on their minds: Wayne Rooney, barbecues and boobs.

Cosmopolitan is widely considered to be the original women's magazine, and is the second best selling in its market, behind its closest rival (much to Court's chagrin) Glamour, which launched in the UK in 2001 and is edited by Jo Elvin. So isn't it rather dispiriting to the modern woman that it is so retrograde in its agenda? And it's not just Cosmo: in its wake, other glossies have embraced this prototype. The July issue of Glamour boasts cover lines including: 'Men's all new sex wish list', and 'Lily in Love' – as the chosen angle for its lead interview with the multi-award winning, global pop phenomenon that is Lily Allen. Company magazine's cover shouts 'OMG – Britain's sexiest men!' and More! reveals why the prodigiously successful pop star Rihanna "believes in love again".

So has feminism failed? As women still struggle to gain equal pay and equal representation in parliament, while faced with mass-market soft porn on the covers of glossy men's magazines, are Cosmo et al really suggesting that women should be so focused on men, on how to get one and then how keep him happy?

While Cosmopolitan, Company, Glamour and More! are high on the man factor, elsewhere women's magazines seem to have moved on: there are fashion magazines like Vogue and Elle, the gossip and fashion combos like Grazia and Stylist, and fitness magazines like Zest. Red and Psychologies very successfully plug into a renewed vigour for self-help-style emotional and mental wellbeing articles. Yet this focus was what changed Cosmo's fortunes in the first place. The magazine's winning formula, really, is that regardless of any revamp it has always stuck to the plan envisaged by its American founding editor, Helen Gurley Brown, in 1965. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

"What is extraordinary about Helen," says Court, "is that more than 40 years ago she came up with this blueprint for a magazine which is not trend-driven. She totally got what women would always want to know about." At its launch in the United States in 1886, Cosmopolitan was a very different beast; it ran award-winning fiction and, later, investigative pieces, and remained hugely popular until the Fifties, when the magazine market turned away from general interest titles and sales slumped. It was not until 1965 that Helen Gurley Brown (widely credited as being the original Carrie Bradshaw) arrived to shake things up. She brought her editorial recipe to the UK in the early Seventies, and in time would launch almost 60 other international editions – over which she still presides at the age of 88.

Before Cosmo, Gurley Brown had written Sex and the Single Girl (hence the Carrie comparison), an advice book that encouraged financial independence and said it was OK to have sex before marriage. She also worked as a secretary in an advertising firm until she had proved herself as one of the best copywriters in the business. This gave her first-hand experience of working in the very worst of men's worlds, and makes her sound rather like Mad Men's Peggy Olsen.

Court thinks we've come a long way since the days of Mad Men. "If you're in your early twenties now compared to in the Sixties or Seventies, although women are still paid less overall than men, they totally think they can get to the top. In the Seventies it was just, "Oh, you'll be a secretary." The challenges of sexism haven't been won, but they've moved on."

Carrie and Peggy can be construed as inspirational in different ways, but ultimately both characters wanted one thing: a man. And there lies the uncomfortable dichotomy. Elsewhere, single women are depicted as desperate (Bridget Jones), predatory (Sex and the City's Samantha Jones), or doomed to singledom (Jennifer Aniston) – but in Cosmo they are celebrated.

Gurley Brown's Sex and the Single Girl sold 2 million copies in three weeks in 1962. By today's standards it might sell even more: there are twice the number of single women in the UK than there were 30 years ago. Accordingly, Cosmo's sales are healthy: the last circulation figures (new ones are due in July) showed it was shifting 430,353 copies – despite a £3.40 cover price that is around 70 per cent higher than its £2 competitors – and the website has 618,000 unique users. In the same market, Glamour sells 515,281 copies a month and Company, Cosmo's other close rival, 240,035. The concept of these magazines may – to many modern women – seem to conflict with feminism. But someone is buying them.

All magazines pride themselves on engagement with readers, but Cosmo particularly so. Before the women's magazine market diversified independent young women might have defined themselves as "Cosmo Girls", and they still write in to the magazine in their thousands; and the chat forums on Cosmo's website are always buzzing. Many women credit Cosmo with giving them their first inkling of what sex was all about.

Court won't be drawn when I ask whether the magazine should have a lower age limit, but says firmly, "Sex is for grown-ups. We're talking to women in their twenties, and the important thing is the message: when we talk about sex we say it's something where you should feel in control and never to do something that doesn't feel right to you. Cosmo has a valid role in sex education, but that isn't our job. We're sending an empowering message to women."

Empowerment does not necessarily mean feminism – which remains a dirty word over at Cosmo, no doubt because it is too often, unfortunately, associated with hackneyed caricatures of the bra-burning feminist. The readers, when polled, said they didn't feel it described them, even though they believe in equality. Could it be that they think the word 'feminism' isn't man-friendly?

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25-06-2010
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Some news of US mid-year ABCs (observer.com):

Quote:
White' Hollywood Vanity Fair Cover Sold Poorly at Newsstand

When Vanity Fair's March 2010 issue hit the newsstands, there was a fair bit of criticism that the actresses featured in the Annie Leibovitz-shot cover and photospread were, as Jezebel put it, "pretty, thin, female and white."

Well, it turns out those characteristics do not necessarily sell magazines. The "A New Decade. A New Hollywood!"-titled issue is, so far, the lowest newsstand seller for the glossy in 2010 according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations Rapid Report. The issue sold 300,000 single sale copies.

"The Hollywood cover was made up of the next wave of young actresses, faces that the public is just beginning to recognize," Vanity Fair spokeswoman Beth Kseniak said in an e-mail.

The most successful cover for Vanity Fair so far was January's Meryl Streep cover. The actress brought the magazine 435,000 single sale copies. Ms. Kseniak said that the Streep cover and their second highest seller, the May Grace Kelly cover, featured "two very well-known women, both of them icons."

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25-06-2010
  99
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More results (same source):

Jennifer Aniston, Gerard Butler Sell Big off the Newsstand

Covers featuring Jennifer Aniston have been the top sellers in 2010 for both Architectural Digest and W, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations Rapid Report.

The Architectural Digest cover featured Ms. Aniston draped over a piece of furniture with the tagline "Jennifer Aniston In Her New Home." According to an AD press release the issue gave readers "an exclusive look at Jennifer Aniston's newly renovated home." Ah, lifestyles of the rich and heartbroken.

"Who wouldn't want to see the inside of Jennifer Aniston's bachelorette pad?" said Elissa Lumley, a spokeswoman for Architectural Digest, in an interview with the Observer.

Ms. Aniston cover sold 118,000 single sale copies, 32,000 more copies than the next highest seller, the May 2010 cover featuring (ta-da!) Ms. Aniston's rumored beau and The Bounty Hunter co-star Gerard Butler (ABC's data runs through the May issue).

They sell elsewhere too! Ms. Aniston and Mr. Butler appeared together on the April cover of W, doing a sexy pose for Steven Klein, which sold 34,000 copies, which is 5,000 more copies than the March cover featuring Megan Fox (the ABC data runs through April).

Ms. Aniston has recently been a safe bet when it comes to selling magazines. Her January 2009 GQ cover in which she wore nothing but a tie was by far the magazine's biggest seller of that year at 330,451. So was her Elle cover from September of that year at 434,399 copies.

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25-06-2010
  100
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I love the title (same source):

Quote:
The W We Were, With John Fairchild

Three weeks ago, Mr. Fairchild met Stefano Tonchi, the new editor of W, for lunch at The Pierre. Mr. Fairchild was worried because he had ridiculed the hotel’s restaurant, Le Caprice, in one of his columns.

"I had written about the restaurant, how awful it was," he said. "It was perfectly nice. He didn't like it that much."

“We didn’t talk about W at all — we were talking about what’s fun and what he does and where he lives,” said Mr. Fairchild, thinking back on lunch with Mr. Tonchi. He mentioned that Mr. Tonchi said he had a house in Bridgehampton.

“Poor guy, I feel sorry for him, it’s tough," he continued. "Well, what he inherited — it’s not my place to say — but what he inherited, a lot of it in people who were not there for very long, and mad art directors and everything. They’re all gone so he’s got a chance to build it his way, which is right.”

Mr. Tonchi, who is in the middle of moving the magazine into a new office and putting together his first issue, told The Observer in May that his W would be “closer maybe to what Mr. Fairchild had in mind when he started the magazine.”

A few weeks ago, Mr. Fairchild decided to end his monthly column for W, a satire of society-types written on the backpage of the magazine.

“The column’s name was written by Louise J. Esterhazy, but it was really written by me," he said. "But I was born in Newark, New Jersey!" He laughed long and hard.

It was his last byline at Fairchild Publications, the company started by his grandfather Edmund Fairchild, where he worked since he was 13.

Mr. Fairchild’s idea for W grew out of Women’s Wear Daily. After Princeton and some time as an enlisted man working as a speechwriter at the Pentagon, Mr. Fairchild began reporting for Women's Wear's Paris bureau.

“I was very aggravated that all the fashion magazines saw all the collections — this was the old days mind you,” Mr. Fairchild said.

“Our idea was to go see things in advance even when they were working on the collections and publish it before the magazines.”

“I’m a very competitive animal,” he said. “I got arrested by the French economic police for breaking the release date.”

He was proud of this.

“But it’s a sport you know. Don’t you like the sport of being a journalist, getting scoops? It’s a sport!”

In 1960, Mr. Fairchild returned to America and became the publisher and editorial director of Women’s Wear. The Fairchild brand began to change.

“Basically, when we started changing Women’s Wear and started being fluffy and consumer minded and less trade oriented, we had such a big success with the society world,” said Mr. Fairchild. “So we thought maybe we should do another publication which would be more complete on that score.”

“I was in a family business and most of my family was absolutely opposed to the idea of starting W. I had a little battle there. They thought we should continue to be a business trade paper with Women’s Wear.”

Mr. Fairchild had other plans.

“A W story would be to go to a place that very few people had been to – who would be there and who they’d see. You’d tie it to people, not necessarily movie stars, but other people who were well known.”

Mr. Fairchild was less interested in covering the glamour of the fashion industry.

“It shouldn’t be just fashion," he said. "That’s my philosophy, right or wrong. In the fashion world, it’s totally incestuous. One hand wags the other hand. The thing that’s often forgotten, that is really forgotten, is that the reader is what counts. If you don’t amuse the reader or stimulate the reader, you’re not doing your job.”

Mr. Fairchild took an everyman’s approach to the world of fashion.

“They didn’t have to be rich people either!” he added. “We’d do a story on some of the Indians out west. We could do anything. The world was our oyster, we loved it!”

Mr. Fairchild said that he has not gone to a fashion show or returned to Women's Wear's offices since he retired more than a decade ago.

“Times have changed. He’s got to operate differently now than the way I did. Let’s face it, we didn’t have to pull punches because we were not controlled by our advertisers,” Mr. Fairchild said. “I suppose we were a bunch of mad people, and we decided that we would publish what we wanted to publish. It was great! I loved those days.”

We asked Mr. Fairchild if he would be reading Mr. Tonchi’s W.

“Of course!” he said.

“It’s going to be great I’m sure because he’s a talented fellow. I think it’s got to move with the times. What I think is fun and amusing at 83 years old is probably boring to younger people and to some of the readers.”

“Listen, let’s face it, he’s got a lot of great people, he doesn’t need me! It’s a new world, a new generation.”

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30-06-2010
  101
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Quote:
NEW TACTIC: Things are getting experimental at Condé Nast. In a bid to bulk up retail sales, the publisher revealed plans Tuesday to print special editions of certain titles that will bundle similar content in themed, newsstand-only volumes. The company used a bound anthology of Glamour’s “Dos & Don’ts” as a possible example, and said it would print as many as six collections over the remainder of 2010 from Bon Appétit, GQ, The New Yorker and Vogue. Elsewhere in the Condé monetization labs Tuesday, Vanity Fair released Movie Madness, an iPhone trivia app that snagged a sponsorship from Bing, the Microsoft-owned search engine. The game is hosted by a bobblehead doll likeness of editor Graydon Carter, who, sadly, did not lend his voice. — Matthew Lynch
wwd.com

 
30-06-2010
  102
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Vanity Fair Names Diehl Fashion Director
Quote:
In what came as a surprise to almost no one in the end since it had been rumored for months, Michael Roberts is out as fashion director of Vanity Fair and will be succeeded by Jessica Diehl, currently contributing senior style editor. Roberts will stay on as style editor at large as a contributing photographer, illustrator and stylist. In 2006, Roberts joined Vanity Fair from The New Yorker, where he served as fashion director for nine years.“Jessica’s work at the magazine has been consistently outstanding, and I’m delighted that her role here will expand,” said editor Graydon Carter.
wwd.com

 
30-06-2010
  103
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Quote:
T magazine fashion director Anne Christensen 'devalued' after losing editor in chief job

Anne Christensen cannot be happy with The New York Times. After the fashion director of its magazine T spent weeks reading that she was the front-runner to be the advertising-heavy fashion supplement's editor in chief, a job left vacant when Stefano Tonchi went to W, management picked Vogue editor Sally Singer for the gig.

Now comes news that Singer has decided to replace Christensen with one of her own hires. Singer's decision is to be expected - editors stock their staffs with people whose work they know and trust.

But the move has left some Times insiders fuming over the offhanded way that Christensen was treated throughout the whole T saga. "They put her up for the job. They pushed her as their candidate, and then they hung her out to dry," says one incensed source.

"If you're genuinely considering someone as a candidate, you must value that person. And if you value her, then why would you devalue her so quickly?"

At the very least, insiders say, The Times could have found a new role for Christensen, the way it ginned up a new job for New York Times Sunday Magazine editor Gerry Marzorati when the paper announced he was stepping down. (Gatecrasher loves the headline that New York magazine's Daily Intel column wrote for that story: "Gerry Marzorati Will Stay at Times in Made-Up-Sounding Role.")

In a statement, Times executive editor Bill Keller said: "We have great admiration for Anne and the creative work she has contributed to the T franchise. Having appointed a new chief editor, it's only natural that we would be assembling a team - some T veterans, some new recruits - to work alongside her." A Times spokeswoman declined to divulge Singer's new hire.
nydailynews via thecut

 
01-07-2010
  104
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Some news about September issues of Chinese magazines (globaltimes.cn):

Quote:
The return of Faye Wong, her September issue and cover girl wars

You do not have to be an industry insider or have watched The September Issue with Anna Wintour to know how important the annual September issue is to a fashion magazine. I mean, it's just commonsense, which, if you do not understand, then you probably shouldn't be reading my column in the first place as it is purely based on the fashion obvious, gossip and the spirit of never being boring.

Speaking of boring, the word is far removed from this year's September issue cover com-petition between the Chinese mainland's top three fashion magazines, namely Cosmopolitan, Vogue and Elle, when only one Faye Wong can go so far.

Wong, the pop diva who exited the local showbiz world about five years ago, but continued to capture the media and public spotlight, has announced her return to the scene with a new EP release scheduled for later this month and concerts penciled in for August. Wong needs the September-issue and the magazines need her and her massive fan base to boost sales and increase exposure.

The battle for Wong to pose on September issue covers began shortly after she appeared in the CCTV Spring Festival Gala in February. With almost every fashion magazine in the country bidding for her image, everyone knew it would come down to a prestigious top three.

After months of negotiations and who knows how much money, the winning publication has been finalized and although not officially announced, my undercover sources have confirmed that Wong will appear on the September issue cover of Elle, whose Hong Kong and Taiwan editions have a long history with the star.

The result is really not that surprising, as Wong has never graced the cover of a mainland-based fashion magazine, not even the local edition of Cosmopolitan, which is run by a mainland media group.

Rumors that Wong would choose Vogue and its publisher Angelica Cheung have been squelched and when you think about it, appearing on the September issue covers of mainland, Hong Kong and Taiwan editions of Elle is a pretty tempting option. Wong's bid to win back fans across the country will also, no doubt, get a bit of a boost.

My source told me that Wong has flown to Paris to be fitted for possible cover couture, all 12 outfits of which are from Celine's new line. Considering the "coincidence" that Celine's creative director Phoebe Philo returned to the fashion circle last year and hit another career high, Wong seems to have a similar ambition now that she has announced her own comeback.

After losing Wong, it's now expected that Cheung will turn to Liu Wen, the model Vogue itself discovered and constantly promotes, although Liu has only one foot in the international modeling world and can hardly compete with the likes of Wong.

My new concern is whether Cheung will stick to her original plan of debuting the group's new magazine Numero and if she does, who will she have on the cover when Elle has Wong?

Tang Wei may have been an option, but after the GQ cover incident, which I will reveal all on next week, well, Cheung clearly needs a whole lot more luck for her successful all-important September issues.

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So what are the best selling fashion magazines by country? I have data on the UK and Russia courtesy of a couple of recent posts of tigerrouge and tarsha:

Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerrouge View Post
The most recent ABCs put the UK circulation figures as:
  • Glamour - 515,281 (-5.9%)
  • Cosmopolitan - 430,353 (-4.5%)
  • Marie Claire - 283,025 (-9.9%)
  • Vogue - 210,526 (-4.5%)
  • Elle (U.K.) - 195,455 (0.2%)
  • Instyle UK - 184,141 (1.7%)
  • Harpers Bazaar - 110,638 (1.1%)
  • Vanity Fair - 102,421 (1.2%)
  • Tatler - 86,345 (0.3%)
I've left out Easy Living and the rest of those lifestyle magazines we never really mention here. From the ABCs I've seen over the years, Glamour has been a strong performer ever since its launch, it pretty much went straight to the top of the list, and given the climate, it's done a decent job of staying there, especially considering that other magazines launched at the same time have since gone into terminal decline.

The TV magazines tend to sell over a million, and Take a Break is a huge performer as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarsha View Post

Some magazine news from Russia.

Quote:
Elle : the most popular fashion-magazine in Russia

As a result of recent research company TNS Russia monthly audience of the magazine ELLE in Russia reached 730,940 people, which is the highest among audiences of all fashion magazines in Russia (NRS-Russia, December 2009 - April 2010).

-- snip --

It is important to note that the growth audience ELLE by 19% much faster than the market average segment at 6%. Editorial changes in ELLE allow not only to successfully keep the interest of loyal readers, but also attract the audience before prefer other publications.

Second place : Vogue
Third place : Marie Claire
Fourth place : L'Officiel
Fifth place : Harper's Bazaar
glossy.ru
Does anyone have data from other countries? Thank you.

 
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