How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Visualizing Fashion / Magazines
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
23-03-2010
  1
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,322
The Business of Magazines #2 (March 2010 - August 2013)
Note from the Moderators

In order to improve site performance, long threads that are draining our loading time will be closed and we are going to be periodically starting new threads. This should help pages load faster. If we do not close these threads we do not have a safety margin to handle heavy traffic and tFS will crash.

To view old thread(s) please use the search function.





source | wwd.com


Quote:
RETURN JOURNEY: It was Peter Lindbergh’s decision to return to Vogue after 18 years of shooting for Harper’s Bazaar. Lindbergh, who formerly worked for Vogue, had been lured to Harper’s Bazaar by the late Liz Tilberis, who arrived at Harper’s Bazaar in 1992.

Sources claimed it was the photographer’s decision not to renew his contract at Hearst. Whether that’s true or not, one thing is clear — he won’t have a contract at Vogue. A Vogue spokesman was unsure when Lindbergh’s work will begin appearing in the magazine.

__________________
Love is what you want.


Last edited by MissMagAddict; 03-04-2010 at 04:16 PM.
 
 
24-03-2010
  2
trendsetter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,118
Quote:
Sources claimed it was the photographer’s decision not to renew his contract at Hearst.
So I'm guessing The Imagist was referring to him in this blind item:
http://forums.thefashionspot.com/sho...ostcount=11278

 
24-03-2010
  3
Mr. Magic
 
Flashbang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Gender: homme
Posts: 102,552
Quote:
When Stefano Tonchi was announced as W's new editor-in-chief yesterday, he said he only began talking with Conde Nast about the position last week. But WWD reports that Tonchi had been looking to leave T for more than a year, and was lobbying hard for a senior position at Conde Nast as well as looking at the possibility of a high-level position at Hearst or Time Inc.

Big changes for W under Tonchi are expected, and although he emphasized that the transition will be smooth — “Nothing is going to be traumatic. I don’t think there is any rush to make a revolution. It’s an evolution, it’s not a revolution” — those at the top of the W masthead — creative director Dennis Freedman, deputy editor Julie Belcove, and fashion director Alex White — are said to be in vulnerable positions.

WWD reports that White was interested in the W editor-in-chief position herself and allegedly asked Karl Lagerfeld and other designers to write letters to Conde Nast chairman Si Newhouse on her behalf. Freedman, meanwhile, has reportedly reached out to Tonchi to discuss the latter's plans for the magazine.

Tonchi, who starts April 12, is expected to "observe" W staff as they finish the June issue, oversee July's book, and then debut a full redesign in September. He'll also be dealing with W's flagging ability to pull in ad revenue, which could be especially hurt now that W and WWD are separate entities; as the New York Post reports: "fashion insiders long believed that an ad in W could stave off criticism in WWD."

There's already plenty of speculation about Tonchi's replacement at TWWD adds former Domino editor Deborah Needleman, Time's Kate Betts, and former Wallpaper editor Tony Chambers to the quickly growing list of potentials. A Times spokeswoman confirmed the search has already begun and the company hopes to name a new editor by May 1.
fashionologie

__________________
Our existence is not worthy without your presence. Join the fun!

(IT'S GOING DOWN
)
MENS Runway Model Showlists - Mens RTW S/S 2015
 
24-03-2010
  4
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,322
source | nytimes.com

Quote:
A Collector of Scoops Steps Down by Eric Wilson
“There were times when I got bad reviews in Women’s Wear Daily,” Calvin Klein recalled in an interview this week, “but at least I always felt their criticism was written fairly, because that’s what Patrick McCarthy did.”
Last week, with the news that Mr. McCarthy, 58, was out after a long run as the overseer of a small but powerful stable of fashion publications, designers could not help but wonder if his departure marked the end of an era. As the editorial director of WWD, the industry newspaper, and W, its glossy sister magazine for consumers, Mr. McCarthy always considered his publications to be the singular powerhouse for scoops, whether a designer was changing jobs or a retailer was headed for bankruptcy. In fact, his reign was so great that it was called “the McCarthy era” in a 1997 profile in New York magazine.
That was the year Mr. McCarthy became chairman and editorial director of Fairchild Publications, now called the Fairchild Fashion Group, succeeding his mentor, John Fairchild, the notoriously take-no-prisoners publisher. For a long time, if a designer gave a story to anyone but WWD, he would pay dearly in its pages. It was the Fairchild way, and Mr. McCarthy brought his own combination of aggressiveness and brash humor to the task of keeping its subjects in line.
“Bite the hand that feeds you,” Mr. McCarthy told the writer Michael Gross in the New York article. “Never stop biting it. And you know what? It will feed you more.”
Mr. McCarthy had risen through the ranks, from a reporter in the Washington bureau in the ’70s to London correspondent to Paris bureau chief to the helm of WWD in New York, where, in 1993 he remade W, which Mr. Fairchild had started as a society broadsheet in 1972, into the monthly glossy that it is today. (On Tuesday, Stefano Tonchi, the editor of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, was named the new editor of W, which will be split from Fairchild and folded into the glossy magazine portfolio of Condé Nast and Advance Publications, which acquired Fairchild in 1999.) Though Mr. McCarthy could be tough with designers, he was less capricious than Mr. Fairchild.
“Let me just say that before Patrick took over, Women’s Wear Daily and W were run like a personality game,” Mr. Klein said. “Patrick brought evenhandedness and a professionalism that frankly were not there before. Fairness is a big thing in the fashion world because there is not a lot of it.”
Though Mr. McCarthy in recent years had stepped back noticeably from the industry circuit of dinners and cocktail parties, he was widely regarded as an astute journalist who instilled in his reporters a sense of aggressiveness and importance of purpose, whether they covered Yves Saint Laurent and Karl Lagerfeld or pantyhose and swimsuits.
“It was all about the story,” Mr. McCarthy said on Wednesday. “Get the story. It doesn’t matter what it is: a fashion show, a party, a movie star or a celebrity. If you can get it first, it’s even better.”
Mr. McCarthy will remain with Fairchild through the end of the year, but he is unsure of what will happen after that. He said he will miss the place where he had spent virtually his entire career, the arguments with colleagues and the sometimes crazy episodes he has encountered as the head of a newspaper about fashion.
Countless reporters, including this one, can recall Mr. McCarthy’s playfulness with the overinflated egos of fashion. (Fondest memory: After Mr. McCarthy ordered a hit on Sarah Jessica Parker for attending too many fashion shows one season, she called the next day to complain — and he printed her response.)
“It is the end of an era,” said Caroline Herrera, a close friend, “but everything in fashion is changing now.”
Perhaps it makes a certain amount of sense to break W’s bond to the paper in the Internet era, when scoops will no longer wait for a daily publishing cycle, let alone seem relevant in a monthly magazine. WWD, which turned 100 last year, has lost ground to some scrappy new online rivals, but its editors foresee a strong “multiplatform” future in the post-McCarthy era. Nevertheless, it had to hurt to read the scoop about his replacement, which was first reported by dailyfrontrow.com

__________________
Love is what you want.

 
24-03-2010
  5
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,322
source | runway.blogs.nytimes

Quote:
Thinning Out by Cathy Horyn
I’ve been looking at the April issues, the month for taxes and shaping up and being sexy (in 60 seconds!), and I’m feeling strangely energized, if not entirely hopeful about the future of magazines. I enjoyed Alexandra Jacobs’s piece about Polyvore in the style issue of The New Yorker. (I also was excited to see the piece on Brunello Cucinelli; interesting business, with annual sales of more than $200 million, reports Rebecca Mead, and I know a lot of women who like the clothes, expensive though they are. But I was bored reading about him.) One thing in the Polyvore piece that amused me was the description of the company’s office, the atmosphere of tact and friendliness — unlike magazine offices which, as Ms. Jacobs noted, “are widely perceived to be snake pits.” But looking at clothes and brands and trends on a computer screen is a different experience, isn’t it? Magazines are diva pits, flesh-and-blood places, and they are probably less so today than 10 or 20 years ago, and of course that outsized feeling and passion for clothes is what helps stir the imagination of designers and editors alike. I guess things are thinning out now, and not just magazine pages. Polyvore is a useful site for people, but it does, as Ms. Jacobs’s reporting suggested, reflect a remote, blunt, user-friendly time.
Other things to note about the April books: Grace Coddington’s timely piece in Vogue called “Changing Directions” (I’m always interested to see how she puts clothes together, and I loved seeing Sophie Theallet’s striped long dress (with a Marc Jacobs khaki twill jacket); my friend Teri Agins in her younger days with an Afro; and Kim Noorda’s account about her eating disorder. After a slow start at the front of the book, Glamour has a hot well (though maybe after Paris Vogue’s military issue, we’ve seen enough combat boots — ’til the fall). Elle has a smart spread about reinventing the workaday uniform; ditto a piece at the front about five inspiring retailers/stylists.

__________________
Love is what you want.

 
24-03-2010
  6
V.I.P.
 
mikel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Gender: homme
Posts: 23,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by missbluejean View Post
So I'm guessing The Imagist was referring to him in this blind item:
http://forums.thefashionspot.com/sho...ostcount=11278
That's what I thought as well when I heard the news, and perhaps the stylist was Rachel Zoe?

__________________
If anyone is interested in my random 'visual musings': follow me on instagram:
http://instagram.com/mikeljf

Last edited by mikel; 24-03-2010 at 05:50 PM.
 
28-03-2010
  7
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tbilisi
Gender: homme
Posts: 17,865
Carla Bruni-Sarkozy To Guest Edit Madame Figaro

Quote:
Carla Bruni-Sarkozy has confirmed her status as first lady of French fashion with a guest-editing stint at Madame Figaro magazine, which asked designers including Karl Lagerfeld and Jean Paul Gaultier to sketch one-off outfits for the former model.

The weekly, which hits newsstands on Saturday, features an interview in which Bruni-Sarkozy addresses recent rumors regarding her marriage with French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

“[Rumors] have always existed. But I despise those that stem from a blog and that are written by people calling themselves Mickey or Superman,” she says in the issue. “I also despise so-called journalists who use blogs as a credible source of information.”

Bruni-Sarkozy, who also has a successful career as a singer, took advantage of her temporary editor in chief position to commission features about some of her favorite things: her charity foundation, U2 front man Bono and her close friends Farida Khelfa and Marine Delterme, who appear in a photo shoot lensed by Ellen von Unwerth.
wwd

 
30-03-2010
  8
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tbilisi
Gender: homme
Posts: 17,865
Interview Magazine in iPad

Quote:
Interview magazine: 'The iPad is the future and we embrace it openly'

So what's the thinking for publishers who are preparing for an iPad app launch in 2010? Journalism.co.uk spoke to one such organisation, US magazine Interview, which is readying itself for an iPad release next month. Interview's Scott Lambert sees the iPad as the future of publishing:

When will the first Interview issue for iPad be available?
[SL] The first Interview issue on the iPad (April 2010) will launch on the day the iPad goes on sale. We will also follow with back issues (40th anniversary issue with Kristen Stewart, Dec/Jan 2010 issue with Penelope Cruz and Feb 2010 with Jay-Z). This is the biggest launch of its kind - Interview will be the showcase magazine application for this device.

How much will it cost and are you offering subscription deals?
There will be a subscription-based system in place using Apple's capabilities to deliver this service. The price of an app on the iPad will be $1.99.

Is there something that the iPad offers magazine publishers that previous digital edition technology has not?
The application will utilise all of the latest Apple technology, which for anyone who saw the launch presentation by Steve Jobs will know is mind blowing. We have learned from our digital magazine and iPhone app experience how to deliver in these environments and the Interview Apple iPad app will be the pinnacle of these developments. It will be a true magazine showcase on a screen which is quite simply, made for a title like ours.

At the same time we have a version of Interview for laptops and desktops and another for separate mobile devices; and each of these are extremely high quality products in their own right. It really has to be said though that the iPad is a showcase in its purest form; slick, sexy and portable.

Full Article
journalism.co.uk

 
30-03-2010
  9
backstage pass
 
montrealm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Montreal
Gender: homme
Posts: 636
anything at low cost to expand the magazine range is good decesion

 
30-03-2010
  10
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,011
I think magazines would be mad not to experiment with every possibility, but it takes a skilled hand to ensure the product retains a certain depth. It's a bit like a rubber band - sometimes the wider you stretch something, the thinner you make it.

That said, if Interview is suffering economic woes, then moving towards a new way of doing business is more of a necessity.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
 
31-03-2010
  11
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,322
source | wwd.com

Quote:
CAUGHT IN THEIR WEB: Vogue.com is staffing up. The site has brought on Alexandra Mack, formerly managing editor of Interview, to be managing editor of vogue.com, a newly created position, effective this week. Though still technically a part of Style.com, vogue.com has expanded its offerings in the past year as it prepares to become a stand-alone site in 2010, adding more Web-only features, behind-the-shoot videos and editor blogs. “As vogue.com grows, we will be staffing it accordingly,” a Vogue spokesman said. The appointment comes as there is enduring speculation about the future of Style.com, which some insiders believe could perhaps suffer a similar fate as Men.style.com. Condé Nast shuttered the men’s fashion site last fall, opting to focus on new dedicated Web sites for GQ and Details. At vogue.com, Mack reports to online editor Caroline Palmer. And, for anyone who’s wondering, Anna Wintour is editor in chief of vogue.com.

__________________
Love is what you want.

 
31-03-2010
  12
front row
 
gian-franco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 354
subscribing

 
31-03-2010
  13
fashion insider
 
cesarcmma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Gender: homme
Posts: 2,112
I saw this video prototype of Interview on the iPad a while ago here (can't embed), not sure what to think, maybe it is the future and if it'll save magazines I don't know, It just seems kind of intangible for me

__________________

 
31-03-2010
  14
trendsetter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,118
Quote:
Confirmed: Longtime Creative Director Dennis Freedman Leaving W; Camilla Nickerson Likely Switching to Vogue

Just a week after Stefano Tonchi was confirmed as the new editor-in-chief of W, comes the announcement that, as expected, longtime creative director Dennis Freedman is leaving the magazine.

Freedman, who has been at W for almost twenty years, confirmed the news to WWD: “I have had the most extraordinary experience working with some of the most talented and brilliant photographers, artists and editors in the world, and these collaborations have brought me unbelievable joy and satisfaction. For me, this has been one of the greatest opportunities I could ever hope for.”
Meanwhile, W's senior contributing fashion editor Camilla Nickerson is said to be heading back to Vogue as a contributing editor. Reached by phone, Nickerson told WWD she couldn’t comment. Vogue also declined comment. More departures from the magazine are likely — fashion director Alex White, who reportedly campaigned for the editor-in-chief role, was photographed working with Karl Lagerfeld on the Fall 2010 Chanel campaign shoot around the time when Tonchi was scheduled to first address the W staff.
fashionologie

I've always loved Camilla Nickerson in Vogue and I was hoping they would get Alex White too.


Last edited by missbluejean; 31-03-2010 at 07:49 PM.
 
01-04-2010
  15
Mr. Magic
 
Flashbang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Gender: homme
Posts: 102,552
Quote:
TONCHI’S FIRST CHANGES: W magazine’s longtime creative director, Dennis Freedman, is leaving, marking the first major exit of the new Stefano Tonchi era at the title. Freedman, who had been at the magazine for nearly two decades, confirmed his departure Wednesday. “I have had the most extraordinary experience working with some of the most talented and brilliant photographers, artists and editors in the world, and these collaborations have brought me unbelievable joy and satisfaction,” Freedman told WWD. “For me, this has been one of the greatest opportunities I could ever hope for.”

During his tenure, Freedman made W’s photography one of the standouts in fashion publishing, often pushing artistic boundaries. He attracted such major names as Bruce Weber, Steven Klein, Paolo Roversi, Craig McDean and Juergen Teller to shoot extensive and varied portfolios for the magazine. Under his creative direction, W was regularly nominated for National Magazine Awards, most often for photography. The title received three nods this year.

In related news, it looks like Camilla Nickerson is headed back to Vogue. The stylist, who had been senior contributing fashion editor at W, is said to be leaving the magazine to again work for Anna Wintour as a contributing editor. Reached by phone, Nickerson said she couldn’t comment, and Vogue had no comment, either. Before making the jump to W in 2005, Nickerson was an editor at Vogue, in various roles, for more than a decade.
wwd.com

__________________
Our existence is not worthy without your presence. Join the fun!

(IT'S GOING DOWN
)
MENS Runway Model Showlists - Mens RTW S/S 2015
 
Closed Thread
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
#2, 2010, 2013, august, business, magazines, march
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:12 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.