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16-12-2013
  46
The future is stupid
 
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Quote:
BoF Exclusive | Dazed Scales Back Print to Six Issues Per Year, Expands on Web LONDON, United Kingdom

In a strategy shift, Dazed Group, one of fashion’s most respected youth-focused media companies, is set to overhaul its Dazed & Confused print publication, repositioning it as the “leading independent fashion and culture magazine” and reducing its frequency to 6 times per year, starting in the first half of 2014.

“People are changing their reading habits,” said Jefferson Hack, founder and editorial director of Dazed Group. “Now, mobile is in people’s hands everyday and they are getting their news and fix of culture from a mix of media. So, the print magazine has to become something more than it was. It has to become a printed manifesto and make a radical statement with more elaborate photography and more inspiring content. It has to be collectable and set the agenda,” he continued.

“What we have discussed internally is a complete upgrade of what a magazine is — in the software (the content mix), the user-interface (the design and tone of voice) and the hardware (the quality of the paper and packaging).”

At the same time, the group is expanding its audience on DazedDigital.com, its most popular website, which has tripled its traffic to over 787,000 monthly unique visitors in under a year. (In 2013, the site has also seen advertising revenue rise by 31 percent compared to the previous year).

Hack attributes the growth in audience to a refined editorial strategy and tighter integration across digital and print products. ”We focused on fine-tuning the storytelling, strengthening the Dazed point of view and providing more insight in each of the articles. Tim Noakes, Dazed’s editor-in-chief, and Robbie Spencer, Dazed’s fashion director, hired a new team, specifically to work across print and digital, and they have secured more focused fashion coverage and global cultural exclusives. Another key driver was the focus on news and breaking stories of specific interest to our audience. The investment in the team and synergy across editorial and social media, working as one voice, has also been key to successfully driving audience engagement and interest,” he continued.

“We have finally moved from being a print publisher to being a digital-first publisher,” said Hack. “Print is still a massive part of our business, but we think of it as existing in a digital paradigm.” Dazed aims to increase its online audience to 1 million monthly uniques in the first quarter of 2014.

As online video consumption continues to explode — by 2017, video will account for nearly 70 percent of all consumer Internet traffic, with users viewing the equivalent of 5 million years of video every month, according to Cisco — Dazed is also investing in expanding its video strategy. Last month, the company launched Dazed Vision, “the in-house video arm” of Dazed Group, and kicked-off a year-long “video strand” called Visionaries, featuring weekly video takeovers on DazedDigital.com, authored by the likes of James Franco, Björk, Warp Records and others. “The video revolution reminds me of the photography revolution in the late 1990s and early 2000s,” said Hack. “But it’s not a volume game for us. We are taking our time. We are interested in truly independent storytellers who have a vision that supports our ethos.”

For Dazed, the shifts come as young fashion consumers continue to spend more time online and competitors — notably, British style bible i-D, which cut back its print run to 6 issues per year in 2009 and was acquired by global digital media and publishing group Vice Media in December of last year — are investing in their websites and adopting new, digitally-savvy approaches to content, platform and monetisation.
source | businessoffashion.com

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16-12-2013
  47
fashion icon
 
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^What a nice (and extensive) way to say: We are doing bad - hence only 6 issues per year.

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17-12-2013
  48
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^ basically. It was a long time coming, tbh, but one can only hope they can produce 6 great issues rather than 1 great issue followed by 2/3 sub par, only teen oriented issues all year long.

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17-12-2013
  49
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I feel like a mags like Dazed are a dime a dozen in Britain. A little thinning out won't hurt.

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19-12-2013
  50
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Quote:
New York Times Magazine to Go Without Editor for 3 More Months

Ever since Hugo Lindgren announced his plans to step down as editor in chief of the Times‘ Sunday magazine at the end of the year, there’s been much speculation about who will replace him. The answer, for now, is no one.

Jill Abramson, executive editor of the Times, sent out a memo to staff Thursday announcing that the magazine will be undergoing a three-month review, spearheaded by managing editor Dean Baquet and T magazine editor Deborah Needleman (formerly the editor in chief of The Wall Street Journal‘s style magazine, WSJ., and Conde Nast’s Domino).

Abramson says the Times needs more time to clarify “how the magazine relates to the rest of our news report and how it can be the most distinctive, edifying, pleasurable part of our news offerings.” Specifically, Abramson wants to determine “how to make the magazine the fount of our richest, most immersive multimedia reading”; “which long reads belong in the A book and which might fare better with editing and presentation in the magazine”; and whether there should be more dedicated staff writers (versus freelancers). These are issues she doesn’t want to leave to a new editor; rather, she wants them solved before someone new is brought on board.

They’re interesting questions. I for my part have never quite known where to peg the Sunday magazine. It is a news magazine, but it has has never felt particularly Timesian (if you’ll allow the expression) in its approach to storytelling — it often feels like a hybrid between Time magazine and the Times‘ Styles section. With Basquet’s deep sense of the Times‘ storytelling approach, coupled with Needleman’s strong track record for inventing (and reinventing) magazines, perhaps we’ll get something quite unique out of the mix.

For now, the magazine will continue to publish on Sundays under the direction of its two deputy editors, Lauren Kern and Joel Lovell.

Abramson may be delaying an appointment at the magazine, but the Times‘s Styles editor Stuart Emmrich has wasted no time in naming a replacement for outgoing Styles reporter Eric Wilson: On Thursday, Emmrich announced that Deadspin reporter John Koblin will be assuming the role.
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30-12-2013
  51
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2013's Best and Worst Magazine Cover Stars



Quote:
As 2013 comes to a close, we’re taking a look back at the big celebrity cover trends for the past year. Between all the Kardashians, the Royal Babies, and the Jennifers Aniston and Lawrence, who were the big winners? For celebrity weeklies, reality stars are still proving to be a far bigger draw than their Hollywood counterparts. Many of the year’s best-selling tabloids featured Kardashians (Kim, as always, was the clan’s best-selling member, followed by Khloe—although mom Kris proved to be tabloid poison for certain titles), Bachelors, or cheating Housewives on their covers. The Royal Baby was also a hot topic, breaking into the top three covers at People and Life & Style.


For the fashion glossies, Kim Kardashian's tabloid appeal didn't always translate. Her April Cosmopolitan cover was the magazine's biggest this year, selling 1.2 million single copies versus an average of 1 million copies during the first half of the year. Her Marie Claire, Glamour and Allure covers all sold poorly, netting significantly lower-than-average newsstand sales. (Figures are from the Alliance for Audited Media and are publishers' estimates.)


Otherwise, fashion glossies still have more success with proven Hollywood stars. Several titles' September and March issues, which typically go with safe picks because they're the largest editions of the year, performed well thanks to A-listers like Jennifer Aniston, Drew Barrymore, Sarah Jessica Parker, Beyoncé and newly minted fashion icon Jennifer Lawrence.

"We lean towards the faces that are most recognizable," said InStyle editor in chief Ariel Foxman, who had the year's biggest successes with Drew Barrymore in September and actresses Michelle Williams, Rachel Weisz and Mila Kunis in March. Reality stars "don’t have the same recognition [as actresses or singers], or they have recognition for infamous reasons," Foxman said.

Former reality star Lauren Conrad seems to have shed her Hills association enough to become a serious fashion contender, giving both Marie Claire and Lucky its second-biggest sellers this year. And despite the actress not having appeared in a project since Gossip Girl went off the air, Blake Lively delivered Lucky and People StyleWatch's biggest issues this year.

Vanity Fair proved yet again that celebrities need no longer be living to sell magazine covers. Its biggest seller of the year was Princess Diana on the September issue, selling 316,386 copies versus an average 252,651 copies for the first six months of the year, followed by Audrey Hepburn in May. (When the magazine did try to go young—like with Taylor Swift in April or Jennifer Lawrence in February—sales were weak.)


As for the year’s worst-sellers, Jennifer Lopez was one celeb whose star seems to have faded. Her covers for Harper’s Bazaar in February and Cosmo in October were bottom-sellers for both titles. Other poor sellers were Jessica Biel (Elle, January), Heidi Klum (Marie Claire, February), Katy Perry (Vogue, July), One Direction with model Rosie Huntington-Whiteley (Glamour, August) and Julianne Moore (InStyle, October). While One Direction has proved a big seller for both Teen Vogue and Seventeen this year, the boy band may have been too young for Glamour's readers. As for Moore's InStyle cover, Foxman speculated that her October cover suffered from being on newsstands right after a massive September.


Looking ahead to 2014, Hackett predicted that Prince George will continue to be a popular subject, while Jessica Simpson and Jennifer Aniston’s upcoming nuptials should also appeal to newsstand buyers. As far as fashion magazines, Foxman expects to see Scandal star Kerry Washington (who made her cover debuts on Vanity Fair, Glamour and Elle this year), up-and-coming actress Shailene Woodley (who appeared on Elle's Women In Hollywood issue) and newcomer Lupita Nyong'o (a recent Golden Globe nominee for her role in Twelve Years a Slave) become established cover stars
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Last edited by loladonna; 30-12-2013 at 04:47 PM.
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30-12-2013
  52
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Kim Kardashian's last Allure cover was in March 2012, rather than this year, although I'm not surprised that particular issue sold poorly, whatever the weather, because it contrived to show her with a 'natural' look - a make-up magazine missing the opportunity to provide a masterclass on her face-shading technique, which is probably what any fan of Kim's look would actually want to read about.

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30-12-2013
  53
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Have to be honest, Katy not selling for Vogue is shocking, i would think she has a huge fan base who would snatch the issue up, guess not. Glad it wasn't Kate who was the worst seller.

But not happy with that report, i hope WWD does a more detailed one!

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30-12-2013
  54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Dalloway View Post
Have to be honest, Katy not selling for Vogue is shocking, i would think she has a huge fan base who would snatch the issue up, guess not. Glad it wasn't Kate who was the worst seller.

But not happy with that report, i hope WWD does a more detailed one!

I agree. I like to know the actual numbers.

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30-12-2013
  55
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I'm also pretty surprised Katy didn't sell better. Perhaps it's because she was rather un-Katy-like on the cover? It'd be interesting to see how her much more Katy-esque Elle cover sold last year in relation to it...

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30-12-2013
  56
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I hate these round ups. They never mention the most obvious fact. That September and March almost always are the best sellers for obvious reasons. Katy in July not selling well. Duh, it's the thinnest month.

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31-12-2013
  57
fashion elite
 
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June is also a thin month and it had a model on the cover and sold better than Katy, so we can say that Vogue readers werent too interested in Perry.

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31-12-2013
  58
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I don't understand why they don't put big sellers on the thin issues and the riskier, smaller stars on September and March - people buy those months anyways because they're huge. If Lupita Nyong'o was on the cover of September or March US/UK Vogue, for example, I imagine it'd still be a big seller even though she's not huge and probably not easily digestible by a lot of people.

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31-12-2013
  59
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It's all to do with the star, I can't imagine Jennifer Aniston would ever agree to fronting a January issue for example, when it's well known she can front the much bigger issues. The September/March issues are the biggest selling so naturally the star's PR teams want them to be on those issues.

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31-12-2013
  60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.D.C. View Post
I hate these round ups. They never mention the most obvious fact. That September and March almost always are the best sellers for obvious reasons. Katy in July not selling well. Duh, it's the thinnest month.
Lauren Conrad's July Marie Claire was their second-best seller though according to the article. So a celebrity can impact sales during low months. I noticed Cosmo just had Lauren on their January cover. I'm curious to see if her selling power will translate to a January issue.

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