The Business of Magazines #3 - Page 50 - the Fashion Spot
 
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What a disaster. And I thought they were prepared!

 
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I was a big fan of JJB's Vogue Paris, so will certainly be getting this memoir!

Quote:
Former French Vogue editor: Working for Condé Nast was a pain in the ***

By Isabel Vincent
March 9, 2017 | 4:31pm

When Joan Juliet Buck was growing up in London in the 1960s, one of her secret pleasures was swiping British Vogue from her mother’s bedroom and poring over its glossy pages on the bathroom floor.

“I was looking at how to be beautiful,” she tells Alexa. “All my life I would get the flavor of the time and place from magazines.”

The precocious teenager, an American expat who grew up among the glitterati in palatial homes in Europe, would go on to become the features editor of British Vogue — at the tender age of 23. “I wanted to be bigger than life and make magic,” she writes in her just-released memoir, “The Price of Illusion,” which offers an unvarnished glimpse into the rarefied worlds of celebrity and high fashion.

By the mid ’90s, Buck found herself in Paris, editing French Vogue (the first and only American to do so). She rarely placed celebrities on covers, viewing her mission as “putting light on the rare and the exotic and the unknown.” Publisher Condé Nast didn’t always agree.

“I always had to do what they wanted, and it was always a pain in the ***,” she tells Alexa. “There was no pleasure in that.”

Now 68, Buck remains effortlessly elegant, arriving for our interview in a trim black turtleneck, offset by chunky silver bracelets and a gamine haircut. The daughter of legendary film producer Jules Buck (who discovered the actor Peter O’Toole), she spent childhood vacations at director John Huston’s fabled estate in County Galway, Ireland. Later, she would become Donald Sutherland’s mistress and one of Leonard Cohen’s closest confidantes. She still counts Manolo Blahnik and Anjelica Huston among her closest friends.


But her fairy-tale life took a dark turn when she was abruptly fired in December 2000. In her memoir, Buck recounts that bizarre exit from French Vogue as a surreal experience in which Condé Nast high-ups sent her to an Arizona rehab facility for 40 days — even though she didn’t drink or take drugs. During her sojourn in the desert, Buck came to realize that her real addiction was to the magazine itself — the parties, the clothes, the constant deadlines.

“I was an addict and servant to illusion,” she writes, likening her time as editor-in-chief to a cocaine-fueled trip. Buck says she hasn’t looked at a Vogue magazine in years, not since editors at American Vogue sent her to Damascus in 2010 to write an ill-fated profile of Asma al-Assad, wife of notorious Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad.

Although she now lives far from fashion’s epicenter — in a hamlet on New York’s Hudson River — she still swirls in creative circles, with friends like artist Taryn Simon and style king Zac Posen. (“Unlike many designers, Zac Posen actually cuts clothes!” says Buck, who will appear with Posen at the UWS Barnes & Noble on Thursday.) And she devotes a great deal of her time to acting, something she took up seriously in 2002, appearing in “Julie & Julia” and starring in regional theatrical productions.

She also recently wrote an homage to her iconic friend Cohen, which appears in this month’s issue of Harper’s Bazaar. “Now,” she says, gesturing enthusiastically, “I write to figure things out.”
Source: http://nypost.com/2017/03/09/former-...in-in-the-***/

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benn98 View Post
What a rip-off, these covers are nearly identical. And even if you're prepared to look past the actual images, the coverlines clearly indicate that they've copied the blogger's work.

I hope he'll get his solicitor on this stat. Things may get messy with the blogger using that shot (which I don't think he owned).....

Btw, here's the link (yours appear to be broken, Tigerrouge. ):

http://popbitch.com/home/2017/03/09/deja-vogue/
I'm shook! i once saw a fan made Vogue Paris cover with Tyra Banks (i think it was from the cover challenge?) accompanying a piece about her in one of the weekend newspaper magazines here in australia and thought that was bad, but this... It's undeniable, the 'reorienting perceptions' part especially. That is cheap, i would expect this from some third rate L'officiel international edition, but from Vogue it's an embarrassment. who the hell let this run? Did they not expect to be caught out?

 
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How embarrassing, it's literally exactly the same. Clearly a very creative team working for Vogue Arabia, conjuring up a mirror image of someone else's work!

 
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More great news in the wake of Alexandra's departure! Coleridge was without a question part of what is wrong with British Vogue. In the recent documentary, he's one of the two suits who decides which cover gets published.

Also, he's the godfather of Cara and Edie???? I'm guessing Jean Campbell, who ticks all the boxes for a British Vogue cover, is not. Because still don't have a cover, and they don't seem overfond of her...

Quote:
Condé Nast president Nicholas Coleridge on Princess Diana and turning 60

Nicholas Coleridge has presided over the magazine world for 45 years. As he celebrates his 60th birthday with a glittering bash at the V&A, he spills all on ‘slebs’, royals and romancing the intern.

CHARLOTTE EDWARDES,
a day ago

Only Nicholas Coleridge could get away with referencing, in a speech to 200 guests at his 60th birthday party at the V&A last night, the story of how he fell for an 18-year-old intern called Georgia Metcalfe fresh from St Paul’s, pursued her to Jaipur and then married her “four years later in 1989, “when she’d finished her degree at Oxford”.

He adds: “This is exactly the kind of thing that one has an HR department now to prevent: people hitting on interns. One would definitely be given a first formal warning. But in the crazy Eighties it was considered perfectly normal to go and harass a backpacker.”

Coleridge describes the mix of guests as a “cocktail, three parts old school friends and university friends, and three parts work and other editors and journalists, there’s an awful lot of them. And then a kind of twist of some politicians and a few ‘slebs’ and who else? Oh yes, museum people. So all the different things I am interested in are all coming together with their special dietary requirements! Of all, I am now an expert.”

If the outgoing president of Condé Nast, publisher of Vogue, Vanity Fair, Tatler and GQ to name a few, were to write his memoirs it would be called The Glossy Years, in deference to his 45 years in magazines, and would open with the following — true — anecdote. “It’s a terrible story,” he begins, “and this room was the scene of the crime.” He casts an arm around his wood-panelled office: very Fifties, very Mad Men, with a diptych of Chairman Maos by Andy Warhol opposite his Corbusier desk.

“We had an editor who had possibly gone a bit — um — highly strung. It became clear that there needed to be a changing of the guard. But when told, this editor was so horrified they climbed onto the windowsill, threw open that window and stepped onto the ledge outside, saying that if they could no longer be the editor of that magazine, then they might as well jump.” My God, but this is the fourth floor. What did he do? “Well, they had to be hauled back in,” he says with unreasonable calm. “By me and the human resources director.”

Of course, life at the apogee of all fashionable London is not always so dizzying. For the past 28 years Coleridge — 60 this week — has arrived at the peaceful hour of 7.45am in his Savile Row “uniform” for a job he describes as one third editorial, one third business and only “one third ego control — and I don’t mean mine, obviously.”

This summer he will step down as MD and president of Condé Nast International and go “upstairs” as chairman of the British operation.

Will he miss it? After all, it’s here in Vogue House in Hanover Square that Alan the Tatler dachshund met his death in the revolving lobby doors, where Alexandra Shulman, formidable editor of Vogue, made a professional documentary film-maker weep, where one former editor would scream at Coleridge to do something about the bitchy newspaper diaries that called her the Purley Queen (a pun on her home town) and made constant reference to her dog Kenzo (described by one writer as “a tiny thing like a guinea pig in drag”) defecating on the office carpet.

He won’t reveal the name of the dramatic editor who threatened to jump (though “they” are fine now, “they’ve put it behind them”), but happily names James Brown, former editor of GQ as “a very big party animal”.

“There was a terrible thing about him: he came back after a very long lunch once and continued into the afternoon with a bottle of wine. Suddenly he took against his deputy and he threw the bottle through one of these glass windows, down into the street, where it hit the Golf GTi of a chap who’d come to collect his girlfriend who worked on Vogue.”

Today Coleridge is “dressed down” in a thick-weave blue shirt with gold cufflinks. He loves fashion. “I really do. As chairman of the British Fashion Council I spent eight seasons going to ice-skating rinks, abattoirs and warehouses in Hoxton.” At the weekends, at his Worcestershire estate, he prefers “very bright clothes” — “orange shirts and things”.

Laid out on the boardroom table is the seating plan for last night’s birthday dinner — held at the Raphael Court at the V&A (he was made chairman of the museum in the last appointment by David Cameron).

He produced a hardback “going away” book for the occasion, a “social history” of photographs of all the guests that have intersected in his life — from prep school to Eton, to Cambridge, to his years working on Tatler under Tina Brown, a stint on the Evening Standard as a columnist (where on his first day someone who’d been assumed asleep at their desk for five hours was finally found to have had a heart attack), at Hearst and finally Condé Nast.

There’s a picture of him cradling his godchild Cara Delevingne (another is model Edie Campbell), and each of his four children. Elsewhere, they’re on a family holiday in Iran. There’s endless “slebs”, as he calls them — John Galliano, Kylie Minogue, Elton John — and toffs, Amanda Harlech, the Princess of Wales. There’s his wedding to beautiful Georgia in 1989 “when she’d finished her degree at Oxford”.

He laughs now that “Georgia must be getting very bored” by all these years of marriage to him but Coleridge is anything but dull. For instance, just after university he hired the actor Rupert Everett to clean his Chelsea basement for £3. He found the telephone was always on the bed, next to the indent of where someone had been lying. “I’m going to get the money back one day.”

Coleridge is the most brilliant raconteur, exploding with laughter, twinkling with mischief. The slightest squeeze of the trigger will set him off. He starts a “surreal” story about Princess Diana and then stops himself. “Am I going to tell this? Yes, I am, it’s my birthday.” And so he regales me about a lunch he held for Graydon Carter, editor of Vanity Fair, in the boardroom with a “melange” of journalists, actors and the Princess of Wales, who was recently separated.

“That morning the Daily Mirror had a front page of a long-lens photograph of the princess sunbathing topless on a balcony. Of course the printing was grainy and the distance great, so you could sort of see she wasn’t wearing a top, but frankly little else. Anyway, she was a very tactile person, unusually so. She rested her hand on your elbow or on your hand or against your back.

“Suddenly she said: ‘Nicholas, did you see the photograph on the front of the Daily Mirror?’ I said, ‘Well, ha ha, your Royal Highness, we do get all the newspapers. I may have glanced at it for a second.’

“She said, ‘Good. I’m glad. I want you to tell me truthfully: do you think that my breasts are too small?’

“And I went completely red, and actually became breathless. I heard myself doing that terrible bluster, ‘Well! Ah! Insofar as I can see your Royal Highness, in your very beautiful dress — ha ha ha — they look, um, perfect!

“After she left, I had to lie down on the sofa. The whole thing was so odd.” He pauses, then recovers his characteristic charm, “By the way, she was fabulous and terribly pretty.”

Was he ever tempted to escape this world of superficiality and go to an actual war zone? “I once did!” he exclaims. “Perhaps in any job but particularly in glossy magazines, you get a mad moment in which you think, ‘Maybe I should be doing something more serious than compile lists of the 100 most socially relevant people in Britain, or the 300 best-dressed men’.”

So when he was approached to make a television documentary about the Tamil war in Sri Lanka, “it appealed”. He flew to Colombo and hired a car from one of the major hotel chains and drove north via the small roads “dodging barricades or army blocks — it was quite dangerous” to Jaffna. For three days he and his team filmed and conducted interviews with Tamil “terrorists”. On the fourth day, the Sinhalese army “grabbed us filming in the jungle and took us to a camp and we were held for three days before being flown south by helicopter and put into jail in Colombo for another eight days”.

He breaks off to say he still worries about the hire car. “It’s probably still there. I live in fear that one day this hotel group is going to say that I owe 28 years of rental on a day rate.”

The jail was “not Abu Ghraib” but “quite arduous”. “We were endlessly cross-questioned. Then one of the guards sold the story to a local newspaper. It was picked up on the wires and then by the Evening Standard, saying: ‘Three English journalists arrested’. My mother was having her hair done in Walton Street and had been wondering where I was when she read this article and rang my father, who at that time worked at the City [as chairman of Lloyd’s of London]. He got his PA to find out the phone number and get me on the line.

“In Sri Lanka this guard said, ‘Come quickly, long-distance telephone call’. So I was taken into the governor’s office, thinking who is this, and said ‘Hello?’ And it was my father. And he goes, ‘God, Nicky, what the hell are you doing? You’re in prison and your mother is beside herself with worry’.” He explodes into laughter. “So that was my only attempt at being a war correspondent. It’s not quite Don McCullin, is it?”

No surprise, Coleridge is a best-selling novelist. He writes on Saturday mornings and already has eight books under his belt “and another on the way”.

Oh good. I do hope it’s his memoirs.
Source: http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/...-a3486496.html


Last edited by Benn98; 12-03-2017 at 06:37 AM.
 
 
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Quote:
Carine Roitfeld reveals reason behind Stephen Gan rift
By Mara Siegler February 21, 2017 | 8:09pm

CR Fashion Book’s Carine Roitfeld is finally explaining why she split from business partner Stephen Gan.

“I wanted to be a bigger magazine,” she tells Business of Fashion. “Stephen never liked that. Controlling everything — it’s his way of working. But I’m not just fashion, fashion, fashion. I’m more open-minded than maybe people think. I want bigger visibility.”
Source: http://pagesix.com/2017/02/21/carine...phen-gan-rift/

 
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^ In regards to being a 'bigger magazine', i think that might be a little delusional. Someone should tell Carine not to worry about making CR Book happen, just get one of your old assistants at VP to publish a poorly written roman-à-clef if you want mainstream visibility.

 
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And does she honestly believe that she won't get the same amount of (or even more) control from Hearst? Hearst is business oriented in all aspects. There's always a "formula" that must be followed to earn. Look at her work for Bazaar, it's filtered, and very commercialized as distinguished from her own work for CR.

Lol @ "business visibility" in short she wants to be commercial and Stephen doesn't want to?

this reason doesn't make sense tbh

 
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Judging by all of her styling gigs right now, it's all about the money for Carine.
I think that CR FASHION BOOK was a really bad idea from the start even if it got better overtime. CRFB is just an ego-thing.
She just wanted to prove to CN that she was somebody and that she had enough power and influence to be on her own.

She has become more commercial, more celebrities-oriented, more mainstream but we cannot really say that CRFB is the best advert for her work.

When she says "I want a bigger visibility"= I want to build my brand...

MAS managed to make a chic and pretty well done magazine. Carine has bigger ressources but we can't say it's on the same level...

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola701 View Post
Judging by all of her styling gigs right now, it's all about the money for Carine.
I think that CR FASHION BOOK was a really bad idea from the start even if it got better overtime. CRFB is just an ego-thing.
She just wanted to prove to CN that she was somebody and that she had enough power and influence to be on her own.

She has become more commercial, more celebrities-oriented, more mainstream but we cannot really say that CRFB is the best advert for her work.

When she says "I want a bigger visibility"= I want to build my brand...

MAS managed to make a chic and pretty well done magazine. Carine has bigger ressources but we can't say it's on the same level...



I was happily shocked to see that the newest CR Fashion Book went down in price by ten dollars. It's back to being $20 (USD) again.

 
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GQ Italia Twitter account has been hacked, deleting tweets until june from the last year → https://twitter.com/GQitalia

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Anne Marie Curtis is the new EIC of UK Elle.

 
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Awkward!! So they went with the fashion director over the head writer? And they'd need to work together now.

Quote:
ELLE Magazine Appoints Anne-Marie Curtis As Editor-In-Chief!

From Fashion Director to Editor-in-Chief, one bold and brilliant leap for womankind

By Team ELLE
Apr 4, 2017

We are totally delighted to announce that ELLE Magazine has a new Editor-in-Chief.

It's none other than our own Anne-Marie Curtis who, after 12 years at the magazine, will be stepping up from her role as Fashion Director and taking on the fresh and exciting new challenge as Editor-in-Chief of the UK edition of the world's biggest media fashion brand.

After over a decade at ELLE, Anne-Marie has played a crucial role in both the creative and commercial success of the brand and certainly the magazine's fashion content and style aesthetic wouldn't be what it is today had it not been for her.
Anne-Marie Curtis

Anne-Marie began her career in fashion in the early 90s. She became Fashion Director and a founding member of Wallpaper*, launching the title and helping to grow the brand to incredible success, before consulting for many of the UK's leading fashion brands and eventually joining ELLE in 2004.

Of her assumption of the Editor-in-Chief role at ELLE UK, Anne-Marie says:

'I have been passionate about ELLE magazine ever since I bought the first issue in 1985 when ELLE first launched in the UK. I am truly honoured to be taking the helm of such an incredible brand at such an exciting time in media. This is my dream job and I am thrilled to have the opportunity to take ELLE to new creative and editorial heights.'

Jacqui Cave, Group Publishing Director, ELLE UK, says:

'The calibre of applicants for the role of Editor-in-Chief of ELLE UK was incredibly strong, but Anne-Marie was the outstanding candidate. Her intimate knowledge and understanding of the ELLE DNA and the spirit of the ELLE woman enabled her to present a creative vision for the magazine and the ELLE business that was simply outstanding. I'm incredibly excited to be working with her in her new role as Editor-in-Chief and realising both our creative and commercial ambitions for the ELLE brand.'

James Wildman, CEO, Hearst Magazines UK, says:

'What a great way to kick off my first week at Hearst UK by sharing such exciting news. Anne-Marie has that rare quality of being both creative and commercial and I look forward to building the ELLE business with her, Jacqui Cave and the ELLE team.'

Anne-Marie Curtis commences her role with immediate effect.
Source: https://www.businessoffashion.com/ar...ditor-in-chief

 
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This should be interesting!

Quote:
A Little Life Author Hanya Yanagihara Named New T Magazine Editor in Chief

Yanagihara previously served as an editor at large at Condé Nast Traveler, and as T's deputy editor from 2015 to 2016.

By Hilton Dresden
Tue, 2017-04-04 13:38

You'll want to think extra happy thoughts while perusing the fashion spreads of T magazine moving forward: Hanya Yanagihara, author of the saddest book we've ever read, A Little Life, will replace Deborah Needleman as editor in chief of the New York Times style and arts publication.

Yanagihara previously served as an editor at large ar Condé Nast Traveler, and as T's deputy editor from 2015 to 2016.

"This is my dream job, and I am so excited to be working there again, alongside the smartest, chicest, strangest staff in town," Yanagihara shared over Instagram. "They were one of the major reasons I wanted this job, but here's another: In this extraordinary cultural moment, I feel strongly that those of us who have been trained to be journalists should be journalists. In T's case, this means spotlighting the people, places, designs, and art of all mediums and genres that might be seen by some as weird or offputting or unsettling and yet are essential to expanding and challenging our idea of what beauty is."

She continued: "One of the great threats of this age is provinciality, and from its inception, T has fought against inwardness and the typical by celebrating the outer reaches of what the human imagination can conjure. I am humbled to have the opportunity to continue that tradition, and to succeed my friend and former boss, Deborah Needleman, from whom I learned so much, and in whose footsteps I am proud to follow."

A Little Life follows the story of four friends in New York City after graduating together from college in Boston. The book's portrayal of queer relationships is equally heartbreaking and gorgeous, and it was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Award for Fiction.
Source: http://www.out.com/news-opinion/2017...ief-t-magazine

 
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News from South Africa - this is a big story here, maybe you guys would be interested.
-see the link below with video interview-

In a milestone for South African publishing, Ndalo Media, publisher of the popular Destiny magazine, will be the new local publishers of international fashion magazine brand Elle, making it the first wholly black-owned media company to secure exclusive licensing for one of the world’s oldest and most popular magazine brands.

FYI: Elle South Africa was launched in 1996

the link: .brandsouthafrica.com/investments-immigration/business/ndalo-media-secures-landmark-south-african-publishing-licence-elle-magazines

 
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