The Business of Magazines #4 - Page 18 - the Fashion Spot
 
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Originally Posted by caioherrero View Post
I don't like the idea...
LOL Russian magazines are tragic. At least Masha knows something about fashion.

And it's great Davydova will not ruin 20th anniversary issue, I'm still hoping to see russian top models from the 90th in it

btw was this the reason she lost almost "half of her body" recently to fit in a Vogue shoe?

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I doubt it's possible for her to do so, but whov would give up the freedom of Interview for Vogue, especially in this climate?

I hope this lady will just lift Vogue Russia a bit. Victoria had some hits, but far more misses. And the few issues I leafed through seemed instantly forgettable.

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Well, Victoria was also EIC of Glamour. So I’m not hoping for miracle here...

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Originally Posted by Benn98 View Post
I doubt it's possible for her to do so, but whov would give up the freedom of Interview for Vogue, especially in this climate?
Russian Interview is dead for a year already. Doletskaya is creative consultant in Tretyakov Gallery now

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Originally Posted by lakomka View Post
^ Maria is a hard worker and doing a great job at Glamour. So I’m glad the rumors were true.
By the way, Maria succeed Victoria at Glamour as well. She used to be fashion editor of Glamour, but when Victoria moved to VOGUE after Aliona was fired Maria became EIC of Glamour
Aliona was fired? Really?
I wish the job went to Elle’s editor in chief, she’s doing such a great job

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Is Doletskaya still the editor in chief of Vogue Russia and Germany?

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Originally Posted by caioherrero View Post
Is Doletskaya still the editor in chief of Vogue Russia and Germany?
You mean Interview Magazine? Interview Russia is no longer published, since 2017.

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OH DEAR

https://www.standard.co.uk/fashion/n...-a3758151.html

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can anyone post this?
https://www.businessoffashion.com/ar...magazine-cover

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Here you go:

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NEW YORK, United States — In her final letter for Elle magazine after 17 years as its editor-in-chief, Robbie Myers wrote about a formative moment early in her career. During a one-year stint as the editor of a magazine called Tell in the 1990s, she secured then sitcom star and musician Will Smith for her first cover, only to be told by management that “black people don’t sell magazines.” Myers went with Smith anyway and in the end, the issue “sold well, especially for a start-up.” Myers signed off her career at Elle by featuring eight different women on the cover, including the 93-year-old African American actress Cicely Tyson.

The challenges eroding the print media business today run deeper than the diversity of its cover stars. But one by-product of the disruption is that the traditional notions of who does or doesn’t sell on newsstands are less powerful. These formulas and assumptions were honed over years of audience-testing and resulted in largely homogenous imagery: picture a sequin evening gown, a sharp suit, a hand on a hip, eye contact, bold jewellery, complimentary colours as well as names and faces everyone knew and recognised, timed perfectly with a new album, film or television series and an exclusive pulled quote.

No one is a guaranteed best-seller anymore. But for fashion magazines in particular, the cover image can have an outsized reach on social media and remains the most public billboard for a media brand’s identity and point of view — and a significant pop culture milestone for any public person. And in today’s polarised and crowded media landscape, publishers are feeling the pressure to think differently and push through the noise.

The result is that the types of faces and names covering our remaining newsstand publications are starting to change, not only in terms of racial diversity, but age and size, too. It also helps that our society is more eager to address lack of representation than ever before. There are still blind spots, however. Marvel’s latest superhero star, Chadwick Boseman of “The Black Panther,” is conspicuously absent from the newsstand and men’s magazines in 2018. His counterparts Chris Pratt and Chris Evans were everywhere ahead of their first Marvel premieres, before they became household names. (The March issues are still rolling out, so this may change.)

Nonetheless, a change is visible on the newsstand. “If you’re not betting your whole farm on newsstand then you can play around a little bit,” says InStyle editor-in-chief Laura Brown, who remembers how she used to “spend my life chasing poor Jennifer Aniston around.”

“You were on pins and needles waiting for those first numbers to come through — it really determined everything,” says Nicole Vecchiarelli, a former editor at InStyle and Teen Vogue and the founding editor-in-chief of DuJour Media. Two years ago, she and Andrea Oliveri founded a celebrity booking and content agency Special Projects, which counts WSJ. Magazine, Town & Country and Architectural Digest as clients.

Halima Aden on Allure’s July 2017 issue | Source: Courtesy

“The newsstand is broken; it’s not going to get un-broke anytime soon,” says GQ’s editor-in-chief Jim Nelson. “People still see [covers] as the portals to your brand… In a time when there is so much product and so little of it really resonates with people, it’s more important than ever to put out covers that you believe in and make a statement.” Plus, in today’s fragmented media world, breakout stars everyone recognises are fewer and further in between.

Consider just a few of the cover faces from 2017: Adwoa Aboah on British Vogue, Candice Huffine and Cicely Tyson on Elle, Mahershala Ali and Chance the Rapper (a rare rapper to get the men’s magazine cover treatment) on GQ, Gina Rodriguez on Marie Claire, Amandla Stenberg on Teen Vogue, Ruth Negga on Vogue, Halima Aden and Helen Mirren on Allure. Even Meryl Streep, who is a household name, marked a departure of sorts for Vogue when she covered the magazine in December at age 68. In January, Laverne Cox became the first transgender woman to land a Cosmopolitan magazine cover for the South African edition.

“It’s not an afterthought in any way that we need to include more diversity,” says Special Projects co-founder Andrea Oliveri, formerly bookings and entertainment director at W and Details. “And not to be cynical, being inclusive and being diverse is actually in fashion right now… [Magazines] feel like they are being exactly what they supposed to be, which is thought leaders to their community of people,” adds Vecchiarelli. (The way these covers get booked has changed too: both Hearst and Condé Nast have centralised talent groups, led at the former by Holly Whidden and the latter by Vogue’s Jill Demling and Helena Suric.)

“In this post-newsstand era, how you measure the success of a cover is subjective in some ways,” says Vecchiarelli. A cover that dominates social media feeds for days can keep a magazine top of mind for readers and set an important tone for the coverage, even if it doesn’t sell. “You have to decide how you want to use this tool as an editor and as a publisher to further your brand, now that you don’t have the same metrics for ROI that you used to,” she says.

GQ made perhaps its boldest statement yet in 2017 with one of its December’s Man of the Year covers, starring Colin Kaepernick, the professional football player who has protested racial inequality by kneeling during the national anthem at the NFL games. GQ styled the athlete in a way that recalled the uniform of the Black Panthers. “It was about equality before the law and racial justice and as long as we keep the message clear in book it would be something that would have impact,” says Nelson. “But I also know that that image itself was powerful, and that some people would react to it in all matters of ways.”

While some readers cancelled subscriptions, the issue “was our biggest seller in years,” up 56 by percent year-over-year. Kaepernick’s cover is GQ’s most liked photo ever on Instagram, viewed by over 2.5 million people in the first 8 hours, eventually reaching 4 times more viewers and garnering 6 times more likes than the average GQ post. On Facebook, the cover had 30 times more reach than GQ’s typical post.

You have to decide how you want to use this tool as an editor and as a publisher to further your brand.

At InStyle, Brown ensures each issue gets more social media buzz through subscriber-only covers, often featuring additional stars that the audience may not expect or recognise. Examples include actresses Laura Harrier in March 2018 (Oprah Winfrey is the newsstand) and Millie Bobbie Brown in November 2017 (Chrissy Teigen was on the newsstand). “Julia Roberts, of course, said yes to giving Joe Biden a cover [for December],” says Brown, adding that stars with millions of followers online “are not living and dying [for the coverage],” and are more willing than before to agree to share the month with another face.

While Nina Garcia has only held the top job at American Elle for less than six months, she used one of the first cover shoots under her purview, Zoe Kravitz, to visually set a new tone: the actress is photographed against a bright blue background. Garcia says she is also less interested in featuring someone with a clear peg. “I don’t care that she doesn’t have a movie, but I do care that her voice is heard,” she says.

For Allure’s editor-in-chief Michelle Lee at Condé Nast, covers have been a point of focus over the last year, during which she featured Alicia Keys without makeup — an unusual choice for a beauty magazine— as well as the hijab-wearing model Halima Aden and a close-up of Kim Kardashian’s face as covers. “Because we are thinking more concept first, it has opened us up to a whole other pool of people beyond Hollywood celebrities.”

Cover testing has become less common for today’s publishers and their shrinking budgets, especially for fashion titles; instead, editors will look at how a certain star performed for a different magazine. When Lee decided to put Helen Mirren on Allure’s anti-aging cover in 2017, however, “there was no blueprint for that,” she says. Mirren had not appeared on a comparable cover in five years. (She shared an Elle cover with seven other women in 2016.)

“Sometimes readers don’t know what they want until you actually give it to them,” says Lee. The press and social media positive response to Mirren’s anti anti-aging issue confirmed it was the right decision. Lee says advertisers have noticed the changes, too. “They appreciate it and they do see that we’ve been super early adopters.”
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Apparently the VA March will feature the mentioned named in this article....Charlee, Fernanda and Akech as mentioned in the Cover rumour thread. Coincidence?

Quote:
Does Australian fashion have a race problem?

By Damien Woolnough
Jan 17th, 2018

We are only days into 2018 and Akech is already starring in campaigns for Valentino and Moschino, has appeared on the Milan runway for Versace and scored a place Models.com’s influential Hot List.

Akech, who moved to Australia from South Sudan aged seven, is an international hot ticket but celebrations of her success at home fail to match her extraordinary achievements.

This week Dr Mehreen Faruqi, Greens NSW MP, pointed out the lack of diversity on Australian television screens but it’s clear that the same applies to fashion.

“Australia is one of the most diverse countries on earth,” Faruqi wrote in The Brisbane Times. “We have over 270 ancestries, we live and work alongside and on the land of the oldest living culture in the world, and over 25 per cent of us were born overseas.”

Looking at Australian fashion magazine covers in 2017, you would be forgiven for thinking that our country was about as diverse as an episode of Friends.

The only Australians to make Vogue cover status last year were blondes Chris Hemsworth, Cate Blanchett, Teresa Palmer, Naomi Watts, Margot Robbie, Jordan Barrett, Bella Heathcote and Nicole Kidman.

Adut Akech nailing the red carpet at the David Jones Spring Summer 2017 Collections Launch in Sydney in 2017/ Image: getty

At Harper’s Bazaar there was greater hair diversity at least with brunettes Miranda Kerr, Jesinta Franklin and Elle Macpherson balancing out blonde Lara Worthington.

But where is dark-skinned Akech, pink-haired Fernada Ly from the suburbs of Sydney with her striking Chinese features and indigenous Charlee Fraser? The truth is that they’re safely tucked away on the inside pages.

Akech was inside the June Issue of Vogue Australia (and has since appeared in British, Italian and American Vogue) with only the edgy 10 Magazine acknowledging her cover star status. In 2017 Fraser turned up on Vogue covers in Turkey, and the Ukraine but snuck inside the Australian edition in April, with Russh seeing her cover appeal. Ly turned up somewhere in the September issue of Vogue Australia.

The stunning and playful Adut Akech / Video: Grazia South Africa

Magazine editors are under incredible pressure from advertisers, photographers and international labels with model approval, so it’s not just a matter of Vogue Australia editor-in-chief Edwina McCann or Harper’s Bazaar Australia editor-in-chief Kellie Hush waving a magic wand.

It looks as though a more diverse face for fashion will have to trickle down from overseas, where Akech predominantly works. At British Vogue Edward Enninful has already made it his mission to edit a more inclusive product and the presence of Akech in international advertising campaigns is a hopeful sign of evolution rather than just a trend.

With a more diverse local industry, talent such as Australia’s Next Top Model alumna Duckie Thot won’t have to move overseas to make a living. Since moving to New York Thot has worked for Yeezy, Puma, Moschino and appeared in the Pirelli calendar with Akech but she struggled at home.

Model Duckie Thot making big waves internationally/ Image: Getty

“I think it was a very confusing part of my life for me,” Thot told Paper magazine. “I was just this little [black] girl in Australia just being ‘Oh yeah, I want to do modelling’, but [while also] being in a country that doesn’t promote black models.”

The runway is already taking note with the upcoming Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival committed to diversity.

“The industry is getting better at representing our community at large,” VAMFF chief executive Graeme Lewsey says. “But there is much more the industry can and should do and must change at the outset and it shouldn’t just be outcome focused.

“The festival is determined to continue to be proactive, inclusive and inspire. And nothing resonates more than a recent quote from the incredible Winnie Harlow who was in Melbourne at the end of last year.

“’It’s not a movement, it’s equality. It’s diversity. It’s real life.’”
Source: Style.nine.com.au

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A publishing company need to pitch the idea of a memoir, I'm sure he's got a lot of stories to tell.

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Visionary Creative Director Fabien Baron May Be the Hardest Working Man in Fashion

written by The Daily Front Row February 9, 2018

He’s reinvented Italian Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Interview. He’s created some of the most iconic fashion campaigns of all time for Calvin Klein. His product designs have been in the hands of consumers around the globe. Fabien Baron is almost four decades into his career and his singular vision is still one of the industry’s most influential. The prolific creative director gives his unbridled take on his noteworthy career.

What brought you to New York?
I had always been intrigued by New York. The first time I came to New York, I was 19 years old and I realized, Oh, my God, everything is coming from America! The music, the movies, the TV series…so I said, “Why should I wait?” Things were much slower in Europe—six months later, we would get what had already come out in the States. I wanted to be part of the pop culture of the moment. So I moved here in 1982. I had only $300 in my pocket, and I knew two people: Véronique Vienne, who I stayed with the first time I visited New York at 19 years old, and Carl Lehmann-Haupt, who had worked with Véronique and was a graphic designer. I called Carl and he connected me to Alex Liberman. I showed him my work and he instantly liked me. We spoke French and he said, “I see you’re good at magazines. Do you want to work at Condé Nast?” I said, “Sure! I will work anywhere!” I moved to New York when I was 21.

What a lucky break.
He actually wanted me to work at Vanity Fair, which was just launching. When I arrived, I had many redesigns of French magazines in my portfolio, which I had done with dummy type. So I went to meet with Lloyd Ziff, the art director at Vanity Fair, and he wanted me to start working. But then I got a call from Alex and he said “I’m sorry, but Vanity Fair is not going to work out. We fired the art director. But I don’t want to let you go. You’re going to have to be patient, because I have ideas for you. I’m going to give you a job at Self magazine for the moment.” Then I ended up at GQ with Mary Shanahan, which was fun. But after a while, I felt like I was getting what I was getting out of Condé Nast and I didn’t want to stay. So I left. Liberman wasn’t so happy, because he wanted me to end up at American Vogue.

Why didn’t that appeal?
I felt like I was just starting to have a voice here in New York. I was doing Barneys advertising, where I hired Steven Meisel to be the photographer, and I was doing my own thing at a start-up, New York Woman, which people were noticing. I brought on photographers like Peter Lindbergh; it was his first U.S. editorial. American Vogue was about a strict way of working, and I felt like I would be a prisoner there, and I wouldn’t have my own voice. Liberman said, “Condé Nast is always a place where we need people like you.” But I did feel like, “Oh, s**t. I’m saying no to American Vogue. It’s no small thing.” Then weeks later, I get a phone call from French Vogue. That freaked me out. And I turned that down, too. I said, “I really can’t. I’ve only been here five years.” I didn’t like the idea of going back to Paris with my tail between my legs. I wanted to stick it out in New York. I also felt like French Vogue was not in the right place at that time. My partner at the time said, “Maybe you made a really big mistake. You just said no to two big Vogue magazines. How many Vogues are out there?” And then I get a phone call from Franca Sozzani.

Unbelievable!
She said to me, “I’m taking over Italian Vogue.” And I said, “I can do it.” I took the job on a phone call. I had been following Franca Sozzani for a long time, since she was at Lei and Per Lui. I highly admired her, and I felt like she was changing fashion.

How did you manage the commute to Milan?
Going back and forth then was not the same as going back and forth today. They had no money, so I was flying tourist class and putting myself up. I was losing money, but it was something I really wanted to do. I did it for two years, but then I quit because I couldn’t take it any longer. I felt I had that experience, and I didn’t need to do it for 10 years. I was exhausted.

What was it like working with her?

We were so aligned with what we were doing. I wanted to use new graphics and layouts and work with new photographers; she had the same vision with fashion. I was totally digging it. That’s where I really felt I started to understand myself. She was an important figure in my life. Those two years meant a lot, and working with her was fabulous. She really had balls.

How did you land at Interview?

I got a phone call from Glenn O’Brien, who told me, “We are redoing Interview magazine and Ingrid Sischy is going to be the editor. Would you like to work with us?” I said, “Yes! Interview is Andy Warhol. It’s legendary.” Plus, it was a start-up. But that didn’t last so long, because I didn’t get along with Ingrid. We didn’t connect in the same way. She was not enjoying what I was doing for the magazine. Basically, she fired me. We knew it was going to be weird for a little bit, but I saw her everywhere; it was fine, and we were laughing about it afterward. After Interview, I decided to stop for a little while. That’s when I decided to do my own company and work for different clients. I was doing the advertising for Valentino at the time, I was continuing to do Barneys, and I was beginning to get other clients, like Issey Miyake. I started my office with one computer and one assistant.

What was your first big project after you founded your own company?
Six months down the line I was working on Madonna’s Sex book, and six months after that, I got a call from Liz Tilberis for Harper’s Bazaar.

What was it like working with Madonna?
It was fantastic. We had Steven Meisel taking the pictures, and Glenn O’Brien was writing the copy with her. She has a strong opinion and voices it, but we all do.

What was your first meeting with Liz Tilberis like?
We went to lunch and we talked about everything but the magazine—England, photographers, food, kids, Vogue, food, life.… We talked so much, you have no idea!

How did you go about redesigning Bazaar?

By building a team, and bringing in editors like Tonne Goodman. Patrick [Demarchelier] was already working there; he connected me with Liz. So when I got there, I called Peter Lindbergh, Paul Cavaco, David Sims, and all the young photographers from England, like Craig McDean, and said, “You have to do the magazine.” It was an amazing moment, which lasted until Liz died of cancer, unfortunately. That was the saddest thing. The first year I was on the job, she was diagnosed and eight years later, she died. I gave my best to that magazine for the time that Liz was around. When she died, we made a special issue called “The White Issue,” because we called her “Le Blanche.” I called all the photographers and each dedicated one picture to that issue. After that, I quit. I was done with magazines.

For the second time.
Yes. [Laughs] I went back to my office and I was doing all the work with Calvin Klein, which had been happening at the same time. At one point, I had a full-time job at Calvin Klein, a full-time job at my agency, and a full-time job at Harper’s Bazaar. It was too much! But I did that for eight years.

What was it like to collaborate with Calvin?
Calvin called me really early on, the first year I was at Bazaar. We started talking, and then there was CK One and this and that and Kate Moss and…you know. When Calvin is into you, you have to be there hours at a time. I said, “Calvin, you have to understand, I have a company.” Calvin introduced me to making film and lots of things. I directed a lot of commercials for Calvin, and I started directing commercials for other people, too. During that time, I produced a lot of packaging design. I’ve done a lot of fragrance bottles, as well as furniture and eyewear, and a lot of beauty advertising. A few years later, Carine Roitfeld called me to do French Vogue.

Did you say no?

I said, “I can’t. I don’t want to work with magazines. I don’t feel like going back and forth.” I told her to work with M/M (Paris), so she did that for two years. At the time, I was doing Arena Homme +, but it was only twice a year. I can do that in my sleep almost. But French Vogue with all the shoots? Oh, please, no! And also, I wanted to start my own biennial magazine. So I went to see Jonathan Newhouse.

Did he like the idea?
He said, “We don’t need another magazine. In fact, there is a magazine that needs your help. So why don’t you do that for a while, and then we will talk about your magazine?” He meant French Vogue. Carine was doing a great job, and I was quite taken by her as well. So I went on a boat and said, “Take me for a ride.” I did it for about four years.

In the meantime, were you still trying to get Jonathan to do your own magazine?
Jonathan pooh-poohed me on all the ideas about my magazine and ended up making a magazine with Katie Grand. But I was enjoying French Vogue. I also met my partner, Ludivine [Poiblanc], there. But after a while, Glenn O’Brien asked me if I was interested in coming back to Interview.

Why were you tempted?
It’s like a first love, and 80 percent of my life was still in New York. Glenn was my old friend, and we worked together for so many years. We did that for a while, but after three or four issues, we didn’t get along. Peter Brant called me in and said, “We have decided to go with Glenn O’Brien to do the magazine, and we are asking you to leave.” It was fine—I was busy in my office. Four or five months later, Glenn hired M/M (Paris), which hurt my feelings a little bit. He organized this all behind my back, so I was like, “S**t, I thought he was my friend.” I felt personally hurt by the situation, but I didn’t talk to anyone about it. The worst part of this whole thing was that probably six months passed by and I get a phone call from [Peter] Brant. He said, “Things are not working the way we want them to work with Glenn. We would like you to come back.” I said, “Are you kidding me? Absolutely not!” I basically hung up the phone. So then his son came to my office and talked to me, and I still turned it down. Someone else came in, and I turned it down. They laid down all the cards in front of me and said, “Listen, we need you to come back to the magazine. We made a mistake.” Karl [Templer] and I made a list of 12 conditions that we would need in order to come back. We put down conditions that we knew they would not be able to fulfill! But they said, “We will do everything, no problem.” It was like a dream job. Now, it’s been nine years!

How do you maintain your crazy schedule?
It’s terrible, because on top of it, I do personal work! First of all, I don’t know what I am doing tomorrow. I promise you, I have no clue. That’s protection—if I knew, I would panic! When I do something, I have tunnel vision. It’s the only way I can function. [My staff] has to take me off one project and move me on to something else.

Are you as excited by digital as you were by print?
They are different. Digital is not in its prime yet. It feels like when we first got television—it’s still in black and white. Everyone is experimenting; a lot of things are good and some are very bad. Here’s the quick recipe: This, that, and the Instagram. That’s going to work for a moment, but you are going to have to come up with something else.

How has the photographer’s role changed?
The role of the photographer has been lessened because of digital and social media. Now, anybody can take a picture. People have stopped looking to photographers to build an image because they feel they can do it digitally. I don’t think the fees photographers were asking for are still possible today. Now, the designer, the team, and the art director are all a part of conceptualizing the imagery. The photographer has become only the mechanical enabler to make the image.

When have you felt the most free in your career?
When I was at Italian Vogue with Franca Sozzani, and at certain moments at Harper’s Bazaar. But where I felt the most, most freedom for my soul was when I did a special project with Moncler. Remo [Ruffini] asked me to do whatever I wanted for an exhibit. So I went to Greenland on my own and shot icebergs at night with lighting. It was monumental to take pictures exactly the way I want to. I’m glad I did it for Remo, because he totally got it. He backed me up and never asked for anything.
Source: Fashionweekdaily.com

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GQ’s New Creative Director, Will Welch, on the Advantages of Staying Put

written by Alexandra Ilyashov February 10, 2018

Will Welch is the consummate Gentleman: He’s spent more than a decade in various roles at the Condé Nast glossy and even
served as launch EIC of GQ Style. Now, Welch is expanding his reach at GQ proper. Over eggs at The Odeon, he fills us in.

How’d you feel when you first found out about your promotion to creative director?
It didn’t come out of the blue, and there were no balloons and confetti. [Laughs] An ongoing series of conversations led to this. I’ve been thinking a lot about the political, cultural, and economic environment we live in, and the ever-changing relationship between celebrities and magazines. The only constant right now is upheaval and change, so I feel like the only way to succeed is to fully embrace that. It’s what we’ve been trying to do since this role officially started, right after the holidays.

You’re quite the Condé lifer.
I started at GQ in 2007, after working at Fader, a downtown music magazine, for four and a half years; I thought of myself as a music guy. Then, a friend at GQ—Adam Rapoport—called me about an opening. I thought, “What do I know about GQ?” It was on a Friday—I remember that I was out apartment-hunting—and I woke up on a Saturday knowing I wanted the job. I was hired to work on lifestyle stuff, but because of my music background, I quickly started doing music coverage and booking talent, too. I became editor of GQ Style in 2015, and for the past two years, I’ve been having the time of my life, work-wise.



How has the GQ reader’s relationship with fashion changed over time?
When I joined GQ in 2007, we were telling men how a suit should fit; what shirt to wear with what tie; get out of your baggy jeans; don’t wear square-toed shoes; you don’t need a giant watch to seem successful. Really basic stuff. Now, there are edgier, more open-minded ideas about fashion. We’re deep in a lawless era of men’s style. In an increasingly freelance economy, “salary men” like myself are few and far between—most of the people I spend my days working with are freelance, like photographers, writers, and stylists. We’re seeing this with WeWork and the shared-economy culture. So this fashion moment, and broader culture moment, completely make sense.

How has your own relationship with fashion evolved over the years?
I grew up in Atlanta, around a preppy environment—it’s Polo country—and listening to hip-hop, which became a dominant cultural force, and then a fashion influence. I also discovered the Grateful Dead. So my touchstones are Ralph Lauren, the Grateful Dead, and Outkast. Growing up listening to the Grateful Dead versus growing up listening to punk rock, like a lot of my friends from New York—both of which are antiestablishment and super rebellious—yields
very different aesthetics and vibes. I developed a uniform; I wore, and often still wear, black Levi’s, a black T-shirt or sweatshirt, and a black trucker jacket.

Why did the already style-fluent GQ reader need GQ Style?
Men are underserved editorially, especially in terms of fashion and lifestyle, as well as interior design. There are a million shelter magazines out there, but none of them are made for the stylish man. With the rise of the menswear movement, including on the Internet, we felt like we could create a quarterly on expensive, super beautiful paper, for men whose tastes had become really advanced. Ten years ago, that audience didn’t exist—there would’ve been 11 people reading. [Laughs]

Was GQ Style designed to address or nab Details’ readership when it folded?
It can’t be an accident that Details closed and GQ Style launched in the same announcement. That said, I spent zero time thinking about Details and its audience in the creation of GQ Style.

Any recent GQ Style stories you’re especially proud of?

We went to [beloved Nigerian musician] Fela Kuti’s shrine in Nigeria to shoot a fashion story. Our fashion director, Mobolaji Dawodu, is Nigerian, and he dressed them in traditional Nigerian garments with designer coats. We’ve also had an awesome time working with recognizable names and faces, but in a different way, like the Brad Pitt cover.

How did that come together?
I had the idea right after the election. Instead of joining the chorus of people arguing and throwing rocks at each other, I thought, how can we find something about America that we can all agree on? I’ve always loved the photographer Ryan McGinley, and thought it’d be so incredible to do one of Ryan’s road trips through national parks. [GQ’s senior entertainment editor] Dana Mathews thought we should take this to Brad Pitt. It was a reaction to the moment culturally. I think it was political, in my way—a bigger kind of statement, yet one that felt appropriate for a men’s fashion magazine. It was a collaborative process.

Tell us about the good, the bad, and the ugly of celeb wrangling.
We’re in the business of working with celebrities, and I try to resist this dynamic where the magazine is trying to milk the celebrity for as much content as possible, and meanwhile, the celebrity’s publicist is trying to minimize, to get their cover story by doing as little as possible. You end up in interactions that are at odds, even though the goals are the same—to make something beautiful, for the [talent] to look great, for us to have a compelling story. Tug of war, politics, weird vibes—that’s the enemy of a successful photo shoot. My approach is to bring an open mind and collaborative spirit to the situation. It’s about keeping the energy good, but being clear and direct about what everybody’s needs and interests are.

What’s your rapport like with [GQ editor-in-chief] Jim Nelson?
One of the things I love about working with Jim is that he’s antsy, in a good way. I can’t tell you how many times we’ve had franchises that were coming along, growing, loved by our readers, successful business for the magazine, and he’d say, “I think it’s time to change that up,” and we’d tear it up and build it from scratch, or tear it up and create something else entirely. That impulse has always been there in Jim’s GQ, and I’ve tried to really embrace that, push it forward, and get everybody on board.

How about with your predecessor, Jim Moore?
When I was style editor, before GQ Style, Jim Moore was in charge of the fashion, and I was in charge of editorializing the fashion, so we really worked hand in hand. Jim has been the architect of the GQ look, which is a powerful thing, for 30 years. He’s been a spiritual mentor to me in terms of work. I learned work ethic, the meaning of creating an incredibly broad but consistent body of work that matters, and everything it takes to make a great shoot from Jim. His sensibility is to be super prepared, and then, you can be flexible in the moment. The level of preparation is unlike anything I’ve encountered—researching the subject, doing an incredible amount of due diligence in terms of the clothing, and really being a stalwart in terms of the need for a fitting ahead of time. Jim Moore is never winging it, even in the most impossible of circumstances. I’m super dedicated to being the liaison for his creative-director-at-large position, and making it super fulfilling to him, and a continuation of his body of work at GQ.

What has kept you in one place for more than a decade?
I’ve watched my peers while I was growing up, or younger people, get antsy in jobs and maybe somebody offers them a job at a shinier title but it is a lateral move. Or you just want change to have change. But I have seen a lot of people jump around, and a lot of times it’s gotten them great titles and raises, yet now, going on 15 years [professionally], some of my peers don’t have much to show for it, other than climbing a ladder. It’s all interesting experience, but it’s like, what can you point to and say, “Here’s my work”? In my work, I’ve taken a lot of risks.

Are you feeling the weight of doing two full-time jobs at once?
There’s a workload difference, but it’s not a huge shift structurally day to day. A big part of my career maturation has been learning how to prioritize efficiently. Your in-box and phone are totally passive things. They don’t care what your priorities are—other people’s needs just slide in. If you give into the chronological, date-received role of your in-box, you’re in a reactive mode. I come into the office knowing what my priorities are, and try to keep those priorities, regardless of other things being slotted in. It doesn’t always work.

How much do you deal with the digital side of things?
This year, we’ve integrated GQ, GQ Style, gq.com—it’s all one. There are hurdles, in terms of different cadences [for print and digital] and staffers’ metabolisms. Some staffers have an idea, put it on the Internet, which just comes completely naturally to them; other people are more about working the process and perfecting. But the more everybody works on both, the more it becomes a seamless process. We all have to have clear tasks and things we own, but the more it can be one conversation we’re communicating, the better-positioned we are.

How do you feel about working in print in 2018—do you ever get anxious?
Absolutely. I was in the waiting room at my doctor’s office recently, and there were magazines everywhere—seven people were in the waiting room, and all seven of us were on our phones, surrounded by magazines. Including me, and I work at a magazine! I had e-mails to send. That used to be a captive audience. I’m not blind to that stuff, but to me personally, print is still really exciting, and I think we’re doing a good job of adjusting to this new environment, working with social, video, web, and experiences. I’m sure it was exciting to have a role like the one I have now, 20 years ago, when money was falling from the sky and streets were paved with gold, but this is such an exciting challenge, to be in the heart of the flux. As a print magazine, at this point if you’re not trying new things and realizing that business as usual or the status quo is not exciting, and not the solution GQ needs—to me, that’s very clear. So I’ve just been going for it.
Source: Fashionweekdaily.com


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Kate Lanphear on Stepping Into Nina Garcia’s Shoes at Marie Clare

written by Paige Reddinger February 10, 2018

When Elle and T veteran Kate Lanphear became the editor in chief of Maxim in 2015, the fashion world was shocked. But after trying out the top of the masthead, consulting at Google, and dipping her toes into photography, she has returned to Hearst as creative director of Marie Claire. This role, Lanphear finds, suits her perfectly.

Welcome back to women’s magazines! How long has it been?

I’ve lost count! I’ve had really strange moments of déjà vu when I come up the escalator here, especially during the first couple of weeks I was back. It’s kind of like when you visit your junior high school after you’re all grown up. It’s been great! All the stars really aligned. I had had other discussions, but in terms of brand DNA, nothing else really resonated with me in the same way as Marie Claire did. It just spoke to the things I believe in.

And that DNA is…

First and foremost, it’s always been a book that empowers women. It’s kind of like the world we live in has just caught up with it. Everything that we’re doing, whether it’s fashion or tech or anything else, is seen through that lens. We need some joy and fun, but we also need to talk about hard things. All those subjects can coexist here, just as they do in people. This book has never shied away from sharing women’s struggles and victories, and exploring what the world is like for women. I want to be a part of continuing to tell those stories.

What was your first day at Marie Claire like?
It was trial by fire. My first day was Marie Claire’s annual Power Trip, a conference in San Francisco, and 100 women are flown from New York on a jet piloted by a woman. It was an incredible trip, because I was really immersed in the brand on my very first day. We were announcing it around the time that the plane was landing, and so [editor in chief] Anne [Fulenwider] and [publisher] Nancy [Berger] were the only people on the plane who knew about my appointment. It was the most awkward flight, because I was talking to amazing and powerful women who worked across industries, trying to explain exactly what I was doing without revealing my new role.

How did you manage that?
I said, “I’m in transition.” [Laughs] But once we got to California, I was able to let the cat out of the bag.

Who was the most interesting person you met?
Bozoma [Saint John] from Uber, hands down. It’s a challenging time for that company, and it’s fascinating to see how she is rising to the occasion. She’s such a force. But I was super impressed by this group of women, and it was amazing to see what happens when everyone lets down their guard. I didn’t know anyone in that room beforehand, but suddenly, it felt like we were sisters. We are all just trying to do the best we can, and learning from each other about how we do it.

What were your initial talks with Anne like?

I’m really impressed by her. She’s so open and so real. She’s kind and doesn’t have a guard up, and she’s super smart. Our conversations feel very genuine.

Did you know her prior to those conversations?

I didn’t know her beforehand. We probably had some passing conversations out in the market, but we didn’t really know each other. We have a lot of friends in common, though, which I think is why we were connected. It’s been a real joy getting to know her.

You’ve been a style director, a stylist, a consultant, and an editor in chief. What is it like taking on the role of creative director after touching so many sides of the business?
I’ve finally found my place. I’ve been blessed to do all kinds of things, but I missed creating content and having my fingerprint on something. I’m definitely using all the things that I’ve learned from those different roles, and I certainly have an appreciation for what Anne has on her plate, and the decisions she has to make. I really think about how I can be the best partner to her.

Taking the editor-in-chief role at Maxim was a big risk for you. What did you learn from it?

The insight into the role of an editor in chief was astounding. I grew and learned so much. I probably learned more in that condensed period of time than in all the years before it. It felt good to take a risk.

What was the hardest part about being an EIC?
Being spread so thin. Creating content is only 10 percent of the job. You’re balancing a marketing team, an advertising team, a digital team, digital initiatives, and social media. You’re essentially running a business. You have to be able to keep a handle on all that while keeping the business afloat and keep it pointed in the right direction. I have a whole new appreciation for editors in chief, and certainly the ones I’ve worked for.

What did you do post-Maxim?
All kinds of freelancing and consulting, and then I really got into working on bigger projects with Google. They were trying out great new technology to evolve the search engine during the presidential debates, the Olympics, and other cultural events, and they wanted to see how it would work around Fashion Week. So I was brought on to build it out and get people on board. It’s easy to work with the Oscars or the Olympics, but it’s a very different thing when you have an inundated fashion calendar in multiple cities. The fashion audience is also super engaged, so it’s a really good test market. So we were working on how the technology would respond to the industry, and how we could amend it going forward. But I also worked on the fashion launch of Google’s Art & Culture platform. I’m sure you’ve seen everyone’s art portrait on social media from this arm of Google.

Prior to Maxim, you worked under Nina Garcia at Elle. What is it like stepping into her former role at Marie Claire?
It’s huge! Difficult, obviously, because I have a huge respect for her, and I learned a lot from her in the time that I worked with her at Elle. I want to do a great job, and I have big shoes to fill.

What did you learn from Nina?
Nina is very decisive and is really able to articulate why she makes decisions. I learned a lot about communication. Now, I communicate Anne’s vision to those in my department so that it’s a streamlined, decisive framework, where everyone is armed to make the best decisions.

What is it like seeing her at the helm of your old alma mater?
I’m curious to see. There’s so much exciting change going on right now at media brands. The whole industry is trying to move and pivot and understand what’s next. It’s about how quickly you can affect change with these huge clunky machines or businesses. There’s new energy, but also no one has all the answers, and I think everyone has been paralyzed by fear for a little while, and now there’s a new sense of recklessness that I quite love.

Have you thought about what it’s going to be like back in the social media spotlight?
I have not.… [Laughs] I haven’t gotten that far! I’m just thinking about the March issue! If I thought about it, it would terrify me. Before this, I was going to the shows for Google, but not in the same capacity. Things have changed so much since that stuff started, but you just have to evolve with it.

You don’t have an Instagram. Is there pressure for you to have one now?
[Laughs] Even taking this picture for this feature…I really prefer to be on the other side of the camera, talking to the photographer. The street-style photos of me happened by accident. I was wearing T-shirts and jeans every day, so that was definitely not planned. But the world has changed. I’ve started taking pictures and doing some photography myself, though, so I’m always looking for a creative outlet. Right now, I’m just focusing on the magazine rather than myself.

Will we see any of your photography in Marie Claire?
I hope not, for everyone’s sake! [Laughs] It’s just a hobby.

Are you bringing on new photographers?
We have all new photographers. We have Zackery Michael, Sacha Maric, Erik Madigan Heck, and then I found this amazing woman in Amsterdam, Carlijn Jacobs, who shot two stories in our March issue. They’re all fairly new names, which was really important to me. I wanted whomever we were collaborating with creatively to also be part of the process of what we’re building. We’ll land on something, and these people will help shape the vision. I’ve always loved stories that have a narrative, so it was really about who could deliver on that and tell those stories.


What can we expect from some of the well stories?

We have a Couture Shapes story shot by Carlijn, which features ready-to-wear that’s done in overblown couture shapes with hints of sportswear. She also did a beauty story. For that one, I was super wrapped up in old Laura Ashley ads. We also have a great story that Zackery Michael shot in the East Village, and we shot all white clothing in another feature. I wanted the well to feel fresh—like a palate cleanser. I was in the headspace of escapism. Sometimes, you just want to go and live on a farm upstate and check out!

Who’s your new front-row crew?

We just hired J. Errico as our fashion director. J.’s fashion pedigree and his dynamic experience in pop culture are a perfect addition to Marie Claire. And we also hired Julia Gall as our accessories director [from Interview] earlier in the year. She has hit the ground running from day one and has so many ideas and such amazing energy.

Okay, on to the lightening round: Last great movie you saw?
Am I allowed to say Frozen? [Laughs] I also love The Disaster Artist.

Last book you read?
I always read Dostoyevsky. It’s the Catholic girl in me.

Favorite item in your closet?
My Equipment pajamas. I’ve also been known to wear them to the office.

And how many motorcycle jackets do you own?

The entire bottom rail in my closet is all biker jackets. I have a vintage one that I love so much, I’ve had to have the arm fixed by a tailor six times.
Source: Fashionweekdaily.com

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