The Business of Magazines #4 - Page 3 - the Fashion Spot
 
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05-10-2017
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I actually read the article before going to The Guardian and while her hints were extremely subtle and not exclusively directed at Edward, one cannot deny that it was definitely aimed at his ilk. It's just like the article she recently wrote about how Anna, Karl and Alber's uniformed dressing can be regarded as an armour. She's a wordsmith by nature. If she wants to take a stab at someone she won't be doing it in a blatant way. Anyway, it would be considered very classless and bitter to take blatant jabs at successors. In the UK we leave that sort of thing for Piers Morgan.

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05-10-2017
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Edward deserves to be given a fair chance, his first issue is not even out yet, and the UK press is already snipping at him, smh. How predictable!!

I certainly side eyed him for his celebrity appointments, Naomi Campbell will not be putting the hours in, at the office, but CN top people knew that when they let him hire all of them. Who knwos, maybe it works out!

Shulman should just move on with her career, and deal with the fact her legacy at Vogue is marred with such lack of diversity, it's a fact!

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05-10-2017
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^I was under the impression that they hired Kate and Niomi for the PR/"edge" they would get, not the hours put in anyway.

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05-10-2017
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It's not just Kate and Naomi, there's also Adwoah and McQueen. Then some fanfare names such as Brokaw and Pat McGrath. This for me is not a dream team because many won't deliver. Unless he's gunning for an exclusively visual magazine, that is.

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06-10-2017
  35
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Apparently there's talk of Jon Stewart for Vanity Fair???? God forbid! Maybe this ridiculous rumour was started by CN to distract from all the Janice Min news.

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06-10-2017
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Quote:
Meet W’s New Guard: Rickie De Sole and Sara Moonves

By Alexandra Ilyashov | September 22, 2017

Edward Enninful’s departure left a big void at W—or a huge opportunity! Just ask the title’s newly installed fashion brigade: Fashion Director Rickie De Sole and Style Director Sara Moonves.

Congrats on the promotion, Rickie. How did it happen?
I worked closely with Edward Enninful, and when he left, Stefano [Tonchi] really wanted to put together a team. I’m working with all the creatives to make sure things run seamlessly, so they’re not shooting the same looks, and so we’re telling all the stories we want to tell.

What’s your rapport like with Stefano?
Stefano is the best boss you could ask for, on the record! No, but truly—he’s incredibly trusting, and willing to take risks. He’s open to hearing opinions. That’s why we work with such a roster of talents; they can come and play here.

Has your work at W been all that different from what you were doing at Vogue?
Completely. I was only covering accessories at Vogue, and I wanted to grow. I want to be the first person to help get behind young talents. Knowing what’s next is such a big part of the W vocabulary.

Do you feel edgier these days?
I’m not an edgy person, which I think Stefano was aware of when he hired me. I certainly have not become grungier while working here, besides wearing more black. But I think that side of me is in there; I am who I am. I appreciate fashion but am not necessarily going to embrace it on a personal level.

Do you ever worry what this job will look like in five or 10 years?
Don’t we all? [Laughs] Yes, I think everything is changing at such a fast pace, and that’s why it’s important to do all the amazing things that we’re doing now. Stefano does these hardbound editions of two of our issues this year, which makes them like coffee table books. The real estate in W is really unique.

Thoughts on how other media behemoths have “hubbed” jobs across titles?
Certain parts of [Condé Nast] have already been consolidated, like the publishing side—our team works on W and Vanity Fair—but it hasn’t had an effect on our jobs. We’ve heard many rumors [about consolidation] at this point, but they’re just rumors. But I love a challenge—whatever happens, that or something else, you have to take it in stride.

How do you know a designer’s going to make it big?
If people at Condé Nast start wearing it, which is what happened with CVC Stones. We have this French jewelry assistant, Schanel [Bakkouche], who found this designer, Pascale [Monvoisin], and started wearing it; then I did; then one of the Vogue girls started wearing it, then it’s like, well, it’s a thing. If people want to wear it that work in fashion and have access to everything within reason, there’s something there, that’s the No. 1 indication for me.

How has the retail landscape changed during your career?
I still love stores, and I keep saying that, but at the same time, I find myself shopping online more and more. I like shopping at destinations, especially resort boutiques. Even if it’s also sold at Bergdorf Goodman, it somehow feels more special if you found it in an island shop.

It’s a challenging time for department stores. Thoughts?
There are so many brands; there’s a lot out there. Websites like MatchesFashion and Net-a-Porter do such a nice job curating it all. There are clever ways to do that in a physical store, like Bergdorf’s did with Linda’s and Saks’ The Wellery. It’s all about the experience.

PLUS! Sara Moonves Weighs In…

What brought you to W?
I met with Stefano when all the changes began, and I’ve been such a huge admirer of his and what an incredible, iconic magazine W is. I loved working at Vogue, but I thought this was such an amazing new chapter. Rickie was a great collaborator at Vogue, and I think that for both of us at W, it’ll be great to expand that relationship.

What’s going to be different about this gig?
W is so experimental, and I’m excited to take risks I couldn’t take a Vogue. And W does such a great job at combining different cultural elements, like art and entertainment, and I’m excited about that. Stefano is really into giving people a chance, and that sort of freedom makes W, W. We talked about my interest in photographers and directors. Stefano and I both have a love of film, and we talked about new directors and how we can do things for digital and print and encompass all the things we love.

Will you continue working on side gigs while at W?
W’s going to be my primary focus, absolutely, but I’m still going to be working with a few select advertising clients.

Who are you tight with in fashion?

I’ve been working in fashion since I was young, and I grew up with a lot of the young designers, who actually aren’t so young anymore—Jack [McCollough] and Lazaro [Hernandez] from Proenza, Mary-Kate and Ashley [Olsen] from The Row, Laura and Kate Mulleavy [from Rodarte]…these are people I’ve known since they started their careers, and it’s amazing to see them take off.

Who are you betting on big as the next-gen in fashion?
I was obsessed with what Shayne [Oliver] was doing at Hood By Air; I’m excited to see what he does at Helmut Lang. Vaquera is interesting, and I can’t wait to see how they expand. It’s exciting to see brands like Brock and Adam Selman expand, too.

Did your Hollywood upbringing [as the daughter of CBS honcho Les Moonves] shape your fashion POV?
Growing up in L.A. I have a huge interest in Hollywood. I left to go to New York the second I could because I didn’t want to be in the entertainment industry! But I do have a love for film, TV, and music. I’ve admired the incredible Lynn Hirschberg for so long, and I think the conversation about the industry at W is really about new, interesting talent and championing young actors, musicians, and directors early in their careers.
Source: Fashionweekdaily.com

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06-10-2017
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they both seem very open and realistic about their roles and the industry, which is refreshing, i'm interesting to see what the new W will look like, the issues i've seen over the past year all struck me as alarmingly thin.

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06-10-2017
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UK Glamour is going digital. Only two issues a year will be printed. November is the last monthly issue.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-41527740

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06-10-2017
  39
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An online version that'll focus on beauty? Ah, you mean posting up corporate PR about this week's new miracle mascaras and foundations, without having to worry about printing costs or returning clothes to whoever you got them from.

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06-10-2017
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Well this is a shock. I thought Glamour UK was one of the most popular magazines in the world (mostly thanks to its compact size). I guess they were suffering with numbers and tried to improve things with the new size and look, but things have gotten worse. I haven't bought Glamour in ages but am really sad whenever a print edition ceases.

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06-10-2017
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p.s. British Marie Claire has to be next...

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06-10-2017
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There is only so successful a £1 magazine can be on the newsstand. There has to be hardly any profit in that, surely?!

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06-10-2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honeycombchild View Post
UK Glamour is going digital. Only two issues a year will be printed. November is the last monthly issue.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-41527740
This really, really shocked me! The decline of print magazines is coming faster then we imagine!

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06-10-2017
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Crikey, I'm floored! This is such an important edition in the UK and a huge loss for us. Nobody is safe! What I want to know is why Glamour, and not Marie Claire, who nobody will miss? Yet when I think about it now, the writing was on the wall. Two months ago they had an 'Instagram' issue, and they always seemed overfond of those annoying Youtube vloggers. What's the point of turning out a print form if your target audience lives online and won't even part with a pound?

You know who will never go bust? Harper's. Because they're targeting a group who not only value print, but actually buy whatever's being flogged. I hope this is a rude awakening for Edward Enninful. Youth is not the answer. It's time magazines start acknowledging the 35+ squad!

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06-10-2017
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Marie Claire is surviving on skeleton staff and it’s global name. Time Inc shuttered InStyle as they knew the audience was there for it online. Marie Claire’s isn’t, so the magazine stays open and slowly descends into being almost nothing. I think the move with Glamour is preemptive personally. They knew they couldn’t survive in the coming years and so made the decision to try and build something that was going to be sustainable.

I think the way the average person consumes magazines has shifted personally. They buy almost no magazines but when they do, they want it to be an event, so may go for Vogue or Elle because it’s freebies. They’re not swayed by an easily disposable publication like Glamour. That’s definitely what I’ve experience with my friends. They don’t buy magazines each month but on the off chance they do, they go for one of the super glossies. So it all feels like a bit more of an event.

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