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06-10-2017
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Cosmo going to £1 probably didn't help. And why pay for a magazine when you can get stylist/shortlist etc for free who produce better content weekly than a magazine that's monthly and £2.

I agree re Harpers. They know who their audience is, what they want and they are an audience who grew up buying magazines so it's in their shopping habit DNA to continue...

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06-10-2017
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Quote:
Edward Enninful, British Vogue’s First Black Editor, Is Making Waves
by Tom Sykes

Edward Enninful is Vogue UK’s first black male editor. His staffing changes have led to a ‘posh purge’ of top staff.

Vogue House, in London’s Hanover Square, has enjoyed something of a reputation as one of the last redoubts of the British upper classes over the years.

But the revolving doors may be admitting significantly fewer Lords, ladies and 'honourables,' as the sons and daughters of peers of the realm are known, after what might be called a posh purge by the new editor of British Vogue, Edward Enninful.
Enninful made headlines when he was appointed to the editorship of Vogue, understandably so, given he is not just a man but also black, two firsts in a Vogue editor.

He is also of working class, immigrant origins, and could hardly have a more different backstory than the previous incumbent of the post, Alexandra Shulman.
Shulman was the white, privileged, upper-class daughter of two affluent writers. She grew up in Belgravia (just down the road from the Vogue offices) and her sister married a British Marquess. She filled the pages and offices of Vogue with people like her.

Enninful was born in February 1972 in Ghana and moved to the then shady area of Ladbroke Grove along with his parents and five siblings as a baby. His mother was a seamstress, so he had exposure to textiles from an early age, but his entrée to the high fashion world came after he was a scouted as a model.

Since 2011, Enninful has been the Creative and Fashion Director of the American fashion magazine W, and before that he was Fashion Director of the avant-garde British title i-D (a position he was appointed to at the tender age of 19).
Enninful was a London club kid of the 80’s and 90s, and his i-D shoots often featured thrift shop finds.

Now, as editor of Vogue, he has been accused of overseeing an exodus of the ‘posh girls’ who Shulman and her ilk would have seen as Vogue’s lifeblood.

Among the first casualties were the magazine’s former deputy editor Emily Sheffield (the daughter of a baronet, and Samantha Cameron’s sister) and its longtime fashion director, Lucinda Chambers.

Chambers, perhaps ill-advisedly, let off some steam in an interview with the fashion blog Vestoj in which she declared, "Truth be told, I haven't read Vogue in years. The clothes are just irrelevant for most people—so ridiculously expensive."

At another point in the interview, she said: "The June cover with Alexa Chung in a stupid Michael Kors T-shirt is crap. He's a big advertiser so I knew why I had to do it. I knew it was cheesy when I was doing it, and I did it anyway."

Enninful took over the reins officially on August 1, and has set about restocking the offices with a younger, cooler, more diverse representation of British talent.

Naomi Campbell, Kate Moss and Oscar-winning director Steve McQueen were announced as Contributing Editors.

Campbell criticized the lack of diversity at the publication under Shulman’s tenure by posting a photo of Vogue’s staff under her leadership. Astonishingly, it showed there were no black employees in a workforce of around 50.

A blogger writing for the Spectator under the pseudonym Pea Priestly claimed that Vogue was “borderline racist” during Shulman’s reign because it only had two covers featuring solo black models since 2002.

Enninful has not yet explicitly laid out his vision for Vogue. (He wasn't made available for comment for this article.) However, he has made clear his commitment to the digital side of the brand by launching a Vogue Snapchat account on his first day in the office, and by poaching the former publisher of GQ, Vanessa Kingori, who was hailed in the industry for her work on taking the British edition of the men’s mag digital.

Creating compelling video and social media look set to be priorities for Enninful’s new team. In the press release announcing his hiring, Condé Nast said: “Enninful is known to be an adept practitioner of video, whose recent video entitled "I Am An Immigrant," featuring fashion industry professionals, went viral. He is widely followed on social media.”

Enninful was certainly quick to recognize which way the digital wind was blowing. He said in a 2012 interview with Business of Fashion, “A good stylist can work in any medium whether its still photography or moving image. But it adds another facet to the whole job of styling. The times have changed so much and still images can’t just sell on their own anymore. I think for every shoot we do, we have to think about how it moves. That’s with us now and it’s going to be like that for a long time."

At W, Enninful was known for his skill at conflating accessibility and exclusivity. “What we all aim for is to make it more approachable, but that doesn’t mean low end,” he said.

Enninful’s critics have accused him of being more interested in surrounding himself with celebrities and the accoutrements of a fashionable life than anything else.

Chief among these critics has been Shulman herself—and this week she reignited the feud by taking a thinly-veiled swipe at Enninful.

Shulman, writing in Business of Fashion, hit out at what she described as a new guard of editors who, she said, were no longer magazine journalists but instead “celebrities or fashion personalities with substantial social media followings”.

She concluded that editing was “certainly not a job for someone who doesn’t wish to put in the hours and thinks that the main part of their job is being photographed in a series of designer clothes with a roster of famous friends”.

Shulman also appeared to criticize Enninful’s new contributing editors, writing: “It has been interesting and educative to see over the years which of the more dilettante or famous contributors really put some effort into their contributions and which liked the idea of an association to the magazine without the tedious business of actually doing any work.”

Few could level that accusation at one of Enninful’s key new hires: Vogue’s incoming fashion director, Venetia Scott.

Scott was for many years the chief stylist for her boyfriend, the fashion photographer Juergen Teller, and then ran an independent studio noted for its edgy, envelope-pushing work. She has also brought a trusted collaborator, Poppy Kain, with her to Vogue, a source says.

“Vogue had become very boring and very Sloaney, with lots of features on rich women’s houses,” says a source who knows Scott well. “Venetia couldn’t be more different. She is super creative and very hard working, so it’s going to be very interesting to see what she does. She goes a long way back with Edward, and they are both interested in always trying to push boundaries, and be ruder or naughtier. The reality is that with so much free content online, if you buy a magazine these days it needs to be really amazing.”

Although attention has naturally gravitated towards those who have been let go from the magazine, there are some old timers still in situ who are positively engaged with the new regime.

“There are lots of people still there who are excited about the change in direction,” says the source.

Undeniably, however, the overall head count at British Vogue has been massively reduced, which has hurt morale. One insider said Enninful’s appointment had merely provided a convenient moment to reduce staff numbers as digital and financial pressures increase year on year.

Condé Nast declined to make an official comment about the personnel changes at Vogue, or to provide an estimate of how many non-white people now work at Vogue.
However one insider at the company said: “In regard to the staff of British Vogue being offered voluntary redundancy this is something that was in the pipeline prior to Edward Enninful’s arrival, and follows some restructuring completed with other brands in the company.”

Another source said: “Yes, there are going to be less posh girls working at Vogue but that’s because every editor remakes the magazine in their own image, and Edward’s a working class black guy from Ladbroke Grove. The only question that really matters now is, can he make it work?”

For any Sloanes feeling persecuted, Condé Nast still has their backs. The November issue of Tatler (whose offices are one floor down in Vogue House) boasts the defiant headline: “WILD, SEXY, FREE! Posh girls have more fun.”
source | thedailybeast

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07-10-2017
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Am I the only one who thinks all the articles on Vogue's staffing changes are getting a little ridiculous? It seems natural to me that when an editor leaves after 25 years there will be a shift in the team. Of course a new editor is going to want to breathe new life into the magazine by bringing in new people; and as Edward is so established in the industry it makes complete sense to me that he wants to create a team of people he knows and trusts to collaborate with.

I just don't think it's as dramatic as all these people are trying to make it seem, I think it's exciting. Why bother hiring someone who is just going to do the exact same thing as their predecessor? There is an opportunity to shift things, so go for it; especially after we've had the same vision for a quarter of a century.

I also think there's a bit too much fuss over the contributing editors, it's not like he's hired Gigi Hadid as the fashion director or something, that would be worth all the brouhaha people are making. This is fashion, why not add a bit of sparkle and celebrity to the whole thing? It makes sense to me to have famous (and legitimately iconic) supermodels and artists linked to a magazine like Vogue, it actually feels very old school and glamorous. I don't even thinks it really matters how much real work they do, it's not about that. As long as the full time staff are a solid, hard-working team and it's not only about celebrity name-dropping then I think it's fabulous to have Naomi and Steve and Kate on board every now and then. Why not? Let's have some fun with it.

As long as Edward backs all of this up with a strong vision, excellent content (both visual and written) then I'm all for these changes. I have a lot of faith in him.

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07-10-2017
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UK Vogue's been staffed by posh people for more years than anyone can remember, it was almost regarded as a sort of finishing school for girls from a certain background. So this isn't just a refreshing of faces around the office, it represents a social shift, in many ways.

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07-10-2017
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I don't see why these celebrity hirings are such a huge media fuss, i'm assuming these celebrity appointments are mostly symbolic gestures anyway? Kate has been a contributing fashion editor for years and that so far has mostly involved styling her own shoots. I don't think the 'posh' staff out of a job have been too hard done by either, of course it's never a nice feeling to be let go from a job, but British Vogue has been especially tone deaf to diversity both in their magazine and in the staff they hire for so long this is really the only appropriate course of action.

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08-10-2017
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Does anyone know why Alexandra never chose Meisel under her helm? He has worked for British Vogue before her arrival.

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10-10-2017
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Very odd move!!

Quote:
L’Officiel Launches US Edition

The family-owned fashion magazine is building a global digital network and plans to monetise its English-language content through syndication and film and television projects, all with an aim to reach $100 million in annual revenue within the next three years.

By Chantal Fernandez
October 10, 2017 05:30

PARIS, France — L’Officiel, the 96-year-old French luxury fashion and lifestyle magazine owned by the Jalou family, is coming to America. The newly established, US-based arm of the media company will launch online on November 6 and in print in February 2018. L'Officiel is currently active in 24 countries and generates over $70 million in revenue annually, according to the company. It projects revenues will reach $100 million in the next three years not only by expanding its global reach, but also exploring new syndication and content development opportunities in film and television.

The play for the US market will further extend L’Officiel’s global platform, which chief executive Benjamin Eymere (son of Jalou Media Group president Marie-José Susskind-Jalou) has evolved over the last 18 months to internally share images, video and text produced by L’Officiel’s editors around the world, from Kazakhstan to Singapore. A central content hub provides translation software to local editors, who then re-edit the content for their audiences. “The idea was to create a common back office for all the countries,” says Eymere. “It’s really transforming a classic media company into a technology company that aggregates content from its own satellite.”

LOfficielUSA.com will publish 40 percent locally produced content and 60 percent internationally produced content. Joseph Akel, former editor of V and VMAN, has been named editor-in-chief and editorial director overseeing both digital and print, the latter of which will publish six times a year.

Conde Nast’s Vogue International is currently implementing a similar global syndication strategy, forming a London-based central editorial team that distributes contents across its editions. And Hearst has been syndicating its digital content across regions for over three years. But Eyemere says that L’Officiel has a leg up on its larger competitors because their local operations are too large. “It’s harder to shrink, that’s the publishing reality,” he says, describing L’Officiel as a “startup with a 100 year-old-brand.”

L’Officiel is launching in the US with a $3 million investment from US private equity firm Global Emerging Markets (GEM) Group, which recently established a media-investment arm. While L’Officiel’s web and editorial teams will work out of New York City, a Los Angeles office will package and sells rights to its content, both by syndicating through third-party companies (as its other regions do) and by commercialising the L’Officiel archives for film and television projects.

“Hulu, Facebook — content becomes so important for those operators that there is room to bring a lifestyle solution for them,” says Eymere. “They think they are global, but to get access [for example] to an old tie maker in Italy, maybe you are better partnering with a media company that has been doing that for 100 years.” The archive contains 700,000 articles and the global L’Officiel network currently produces between 60,000 to 100,000 pieces of content per year. “They each have a value for third parties that would be interested in aggregating high-end lifestyle content,” he says.

The US launch marks a new chapter for L’Officiel, whose parent company entered the country with a short-lived edition of another one of its titles, Jalouse, in 2000. “We have shifted the model of our company the past seven to eight years tremendously,” says Eymere. “It’s an opportunity business, you can’t plan everything.”
Source: BusinessOfFashion.com

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10-10-2017
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their business model has always intrigued me - they have so many international editions in some really surprising countries. I can't even conceptualise what an American L'officiel would look like, their overseas editions are all so dissimilar it could really look like anything. I'm eager to see how it evolves.

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12-10-2017
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Jo Elvin is leaving British Glamour, after a 17-year tenure!

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12-10-2017
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that is surprising news! Back in February the Australian version of 60 minutes did a story on Jo, and she still seemed extremely optimistic and enthusiastic about her role and the future of Glamour, so for it to cease being monthly and for her to depart is a shock. It seems British glossies have been hit especially hard over the past year, with InStyle UK and now Glamour, who is next?


Last edited by magsaddict; 12-10-2017 at 10:27 AM.
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12-10-2017
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Is it surprising though? Glamour is going to a bi-annual and totally shifting its focus online. It’s a cost saving model if ever there was one. It wouldn’t surprise me if she’d taken a pay off and will be replaced by someone more junior and cheaper. I imagine their staff could be in for some cuts or movement too.

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12-10-2017
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I think only 16 jobs will remain.

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12-10-2017
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The problem is too many of the current big editors are too old school.
Glamour, Marie Claire, Red, GQ... these editors have been in these jobs for too long. They dont reflect the reader. They are out of touch.

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13-10-2017
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The premiere cover?


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Last edited by vogue28; 13-10-2017 at 02:03 PM. Reason: Ammending Link
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17-10-2017
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Quote:
Marie Claire Taps Kate Lanphear as Creative Director
The position has been vacant since Nina Garcia left for Elle last month.

Kara Bloomgarden-Smoke | October 16, 2017

Kate Lanphear has been tapped as creative director of Marie Claire, the position that became vacant when Nina Garcia was named editor in chief of Elle last month.

“Kate is one of the most creative, stylish, sought after talents in fashion today,” Marie Claire’s editor in chief Anne Fulenwider. “She brings with her invaluable expertise and relationships in the fashion and tech community that align perfectly with the vision of Marie Claire. Her discerning eye for smart style will help us continue to create extraordinary content for our readers.” Fulenwider announced the hire at the magazine’s the magazine’s second annual “Power Trip” to San Francisco.

Lanphear, the former editor in chief of Maxim, had previously worked for Hearst at Elle and Harper’s Bazaar. Since leaving Maxim in 2015, after a brief stint atop the masthead, Lanphear has worked on fashion-centric projects for Google.

“Joining Marie Claire feels like the perfect homecoming to editorial,” Lanphear said. “The DNA of the brand resonates deeply with me and what I believe in. It is an exciting intersection of the worlds that I love — fashion — with technology, social consciousness and empowerment of women. I can’t wait to get started and work with Anne and her incredibly talented team.”
source | wwd

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