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20-02-2009
  16
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enVogue's Avatar
 
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Milla's ed looks wonderful
Thanks a lot for scanning those

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20-02-2009
  17
The future is stupid
 
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source | screencap by MMA from nytimes

Quote:
Love Child
KATIE GRAND, STYLIST AND EDITOR DU JOUR, HAS A NEW OFFSPRING.
BY HORACIO SILVA

Katie Grand has never met a handbag she didn’t love. Grand, the putative stylist’s stylist, sounding board for the likes of Marc and Miuccia, and former editor of the achingly hip Pop, uses them on the runway and in fashion shoots as liberally as Georgia O’Keeffe sprinkled her paintings with cattle skulls.

But as anyone who has followed Grand’s outré magazine work, from Dazed & Confused to The Face and then Pop, will attest, she also carries a torch for guinea pigs and rabbits, the Muppets and sunsets, Snoopy and Miss Marple, and Lucy from ‘‘Peanuts.’’

These days, following the announcement in September that she had quit Pop (taking the entire staff with her), Grand has a new object of affection: Love, a biannual publication bankrolled by Condé Nast U.K. that hits newsstands this week.

‘‘I said, ‘No animals or Muppets in this one,’ ’’ Grand deadpanned in her fittingly high-pitched, cartoonlike squeak when I met her in London in late December. But at Love’s Clerkenwell office, which is across town from Condé Nast headquarters, first indications suggested that it was funny business as usual, with an oversize stuffed guinea pig on a couch passing for a receptionist.

‘‘That’s Keith,’’ said Grand, 36, who was wearing Paper Denim & Cloth jeans, a vintage Sigue Sigue Sputnik T-shirt, a Chanel blanket wrapped as a scarf and glittery Miu Miu heels. ‘‘Clara, my real rabbit, was here for a week, but she upset some people who thought she was chewing the computer leads. She doesn’t even like electrical appliances, but I didn’t think I’d get into that kind of argument so early on.’’

A few minutes later, as Grand, nursing an incipient cold, walked me through the contents of the debut issue of Love, it was clear she was taking a less whimsical, more rough-hewn approach to contemporary glamour than she had at the playfully self-deprecating but ultraglossy Pop.

‘‘I’ve been thinking for a while about having a magazine that was more raw and less retouched,’’ she said. ‘‘When I started work on Love, I was looking at a lot of back issues of The Face, and just remembering a time when you could do an iconic image like the David Sims cover of Kurt Cobain in a dress. We’ve come so far away from that, and I wonder whether it’s in a good way. And with the economy as it is, I wanted to do something that was a reality check on many levels.’’

The editorial vision may be grittier, but Love, like Grand, is still enamored of celebrities. The first issue is an A-Z of ‘‘icons of our time,’’ from bona fide stars like Amy Winehouse and Iggy Pop to emerging talents like Tiny Masters of Today and Alexandra Burke (the hugely popular British singer who won the most recent season of ‘‘The X Factor’’). Except for multipage fashion stories with Kate Moss and Lara Stone, big-name models appear only when channeling celebrities, including Agyness Deyn as her idol, Queen Elizabeth II.

‘‘I wanted to do an issue full of personalities I loved,’’ said Grand, adding that there was no pressure from Condé Nast to stack the magazine with big names, even though many of them happen to be her friends, as evidenced by the handwritten Christmas card on the wall from the Beckhams. ‘‘They basically said, ‘Do whatever you want.’ The fact that we have Beth Ditto naked on the cover shows that.’’

Although she is generally perceived to be the reigning Empress of Edge, whose quirky individual point of view has enabled many a designer to push the envelope to the point of paper cuts, Grand is at pains to point out that the last thing she wants to produce is a marginal magazine. ‘‘It’s very easy to be cool and self-indulgent,’’ she said. ‘‘I think as an editor you have a responsibility to do an interesting, commercial magazine that people want to look at. We need a readership as well as advertisers.’’

The subject of advertising and Grand is as complicated as the overembellished shoes she worked on with Marc Jacobs for the current Vuitton collection. Condé Nast is clearly banking on Grand and her contributors (Hedi Slimane, Panos Yiapanis, Alasdair McLellan, Joe McKenna) to turn Love into a must-read for hard-core fashionistas and the advertisers who love them — in other words, the very clients for whom Grand styles. Is Nicholas Coleridge, the managing director of Condé Nast U.K., concerned? ‘‘Not at all,’’ he said. ‘‘We took her on knowing that she has styling work elsewhere. I haven’t noticed any conflicts of interest yet.’’

While Grand herself says she feels no pressure to support the companies she freelances for, she admits that some designers get a little frustrated with her relationship with Miuccia Prada, for whom she frequently styled shows and campaigns until three years ago. ‘‘I am conscious of not being too Prada-centric because I know I can quite easily be,’’ she said. ‘‘Basically, I think she got a little bored with me so she stopped working with me, but I hope we can always have the same kind of dialogue we do because I find her incredibly inspiring and brilliant.’’ Despite the lack of recent bookings, apparently the admiration is mutual. ‘‘Katie has such a lucid and bold vision of fashion,’’ Prada said via e-mail. ‘‘I’ve always admired her work; she’s never afraid of anything.’’

Like many fashion-world insiders, Grand grew up as a shy outsider. Raised in a middle-class area of Birmingham (England’s second city and not the village that some class-conscious members of the English press make it sound like when discussing her roots), she religiously studied the pages of magazines like Smash Hits and Just Seventeen before graduating to style bibles like Blitz, The Face, i-D and Vogue. In 1990, she moved to London and enrolled at Central St. Martins, flitting between courses and earning money by knitting, mostly for other students, and writing knitting patterns for British Elle. During a compulsory gap year in 1993, she worked briefly for a knitwear company packing boxes and spent her nights with a posse of creative misfits, including the photographer Rankin, who asked her to work on Dazed & Confused, a magazine he was looking to start. ‘‘I said yes, and left box packing and college for good,’’ Grand recalled, adding that the two soon became an item.

Rankin and his friend and collaborator, the editor Jefferson Hack, were also working on another magazine called Eat Me, the contents of which are a blur to Grand, who admits to having been a big drinker at the time. ‘‘I know there’s a lovely picture of me topless in the supermarket,’’ she said. ‘‘It was basically just people we knew and everyone appeared naked.’’

Though Eat Me was short-lived, Grand became increasingly involved with Dazed & Confused, eventually becoming the founding editor of its spinoff magazine, Another, the first cover of which featured a head shot of a sheep. Then, in 1999, Emap, which had bought The Face, tapped Grand to become the magazine’s fashion director, luring her with the promise of starting a sister publication, an idea that ultimately evolved into Pop.
It was around this time that Grand, who had begun to style celebrities like Kylie Minogue, received a call from another friend, Stuart Vevers, the accessories designer at Bottega Veneta. Vevers, now the creative director at Loewe, enlisted Grand to help with the styling of Bottega; she, in turn, hired Giles Deacon, another ex-boyfriend, as head designer. ‘‘As you can see, I’m pretty friendly with all of my exes,’’ Grand said, pointing out that she also used to date Lee Swillingham, the creative director at Love.

Since then, she has augmented her relatively low paying magazine work by making a lucrative career — one of her media monikers is Grand-a-Minute — as arguably the most sought-out stylist in the industry. ‘‘When you hire Katie, it shows you mean business,’’ said the milliner Stephen Jones. ‘‘It’s like having Manolo do your shoes. And before they know it, they’re part of the Katie Grand club.’’

And although she has served as an employment agency for her friends, having boosted the careers of Hussein Chalayan, Antonio Berardi and Luella Bartley, to name a few, as well as a generation of English stylists and models, she is known for her unrelenting candor, even among her nearest and dearest. ‘‘Sometimes that’s hard to take,’’ Vevers said, ‘‘but it’s why I respect her.’’

She is also, by all accounts, an incredibly adept networker — ‘‘One of the best I’ve ever met,’’ Coleridge said — and possessed of an infectious energy that comes in handy at 4 a.m. brainstorming sessions.
Her vigor, frankness and ability to bolster a designer’s confidence were evident at a fitting for Giles Deacon a few days after our first interview. Grand and Deacon, who had barely begun sketching his fall collection, were meeting with Stephen Jones to decide on the hats for the runway show in late February.

The three had initially proposed hats that were less gimmicky than the Pac-Man-inspired helmets that Jones had created for the previous collection, but Jones arrived with an enormous prototype, inspired by the flying saucers at the beginning of the movie ‘‘Mars Attacks!’’ and designed to be worn over what resembled an evening bathing cap.

Deacon appeared to be more than a little concerned, with both the prototype and Grand’s possible reaction to it. But with a mix of gentle prodding — ‘‘I wonder if it does something it shouldn’t?’’ — and a firm hand that brought to mind the bossiness of her beloved Lucy — ‘‘I don’t like that; I think it will look funny, and not in a good way’’ — Grand clearly articulated her vision, breaking the sometimes uncomfortable silence with a joke.

The hat, which was originally intended to be made in flock, was rethought in leather and suede, and a seam was added from the base through the crown — to give it a ‘‘more hatty, saddlery feel,’’ Grand explained. Deacon, clearly energized by his collaborators’ statements of intent, was soon on a roll, settling on fabrics, colors and embellishments like ostrich feathers. And before long, the collection had taken shape, at least in Deacon’s mind.

As for the bathing cap? Grand reconsidered it as Jones was about to leave. ‘‘I wonder if it doesn’t need some little friends, like Princess Leia ears,’’ she said with the curiosity and passion of a woman for whom Fashion with a capital F remains her first love.

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20-02-2009
  18
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It's still impossible for me to get my hands on this (fantastic) publication ....
Do you any french knows where to find it ?! MMA once helped me ... But the magazine wasn't in IHT ...... Maybe I just got one week wrong .... Please tell me !!!!

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20-02-2009
  19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BerlinRocks View Post
It's still impossible for me to get my hands on this (fantastic) publication ....
Do you any french knows where to find it ?! MMA once helped me ... But the magazine wasn't in IHT ...... Maybe I just got one week wrong .... Please tell me !!!!
It will be available in Europe on Saturday February 21st. It should be part of the weekend edition of the IHT sold on newsstands.

Here is the phone # in France: +33 (0) 1 41 43 93 61

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20-02-2009
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^thanks soooooo much ....
of course just when i'm leaving for a week-end in the middle of nowhere on a mountain top ....
will try to get it on sunday evening !

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20-02-2009
  21
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OMG.

All of these editorials are SO good. especially Stams .

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20-02-2009
  22
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Jessica's ed is stunning.

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20-02-2009
  23
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Thank you so much MMA!
It looks amazing!

I hate the IHT edition It's printed on better paper but they don't print all the editorials from T and they also never publish the entire sets

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20-02-2009
  24
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I want to have this! so does IHT mean international herald tribune?

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20-02-2009
  25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dieselmax View Post
Thank you so much MMA!
It looks amazing!

I hate the IHT edition It's printed on better paper but they don't print all the editorials from T and they also never publish the entire sets
ah vraiment max ?
So non-americans actually never got T Style ?! That's a shame !!
I have called them anyway ... The guy didn't even know what I talked about ... and Good Luck to find someone who's talking french in their offices (in Paris) ...

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20-02-2009
  26
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^hi berlin i can got this here..at the price of 2€....it's a free supplement of the nyt,isn't it?someone here takes it away and sells it separately...anyway i don't care it cause it's quite cheap.in a word this is a good magazine with some very nice eds and interesting articles....and anne christensen does a good job as the fashion director.

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20-02-2009
  27
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source | nytimes


What shame more people didn't like the editorials or even cared to comment on them at all... but many thanks to all that did take the time to comment

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20-02-2009
  28
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^I love the editorial with Milla, thanks so much.

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21-02-2009
  29
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i thought the styling in Anna G's editorial was fantastic. the 'make-up camouflage' reminded me of Japanese warriors which fits perfectly (aesthetically at least) the theme of geometrical fashions.
Suvi's edit is a beautiful one too. made me think of one of her earlier works for W.
in NY Times T Style Magazine i always fancy Suzy Menkes' column and Cathy Horyn's stuff. now i wish all the advertising on their website wouldn't be so irritating. but maybe it's just the price we all have to pay...

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21-02-2009
  30
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I never knew it would be this good! Lara's and Jessica's editorial are both fantastic!
thank you for posting MissMagAddict

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