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23-09-2005
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^^ It's about time.

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23-09-2005
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I didn't know that social services (not to mention the metropolitan police commisioner) were in the habit of waiting to get their information from tabloid rags before investigating.

The SAS could save money by scrapping their intelligence forces and watching CNN instead.

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Last edited by PrinceOfCats; 23-09-2005 at 12:29 PM.
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23-09-2005
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I just read the thing of Sienna Miller replacing Kate for Buberry ads.

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23-09-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrinceOfCats
I didn't know that social services (not to mention the metropolitan police commisioner) were in the habit of waiting to get their information from tabloid rags before investigating.

The SAS could save money by scrapping their intelligence forces and watching CNN instead.
^ only you know they'd spend it on subscriptions to the sun and greasy food. ... Hang on, isn't that what they do already?

I think the media hysterics about Kate recently have been absurd. I don't agree with taking drugs, nor am I endorsing it in her case, but that's Kate's business not anyone elses. The articles about her make it seem as though the whole incident is highly shocking, as though she is the only person in the public eye ever to dabble in drugs

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23-09-2005
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Quote:
Burberry's double standards over Kate and Freddie
KATE MOSS had very publicly been banged to rights by fashion giants Chanel, Burberry and H&M, which have all cancelled their forthcoming projects with the supermodel following allegations of cocaine use.
But far from winning praise for taking the moral high ground, Burberry now stands accused of double standards. For the British fashion house, famed for its beige check coats, had no qualms when it came to hiring bad boy Lord Freddie Windsor for a campaign in 2000, a year after he publicly admitted taking cocaine during his first year at university.
Is it, therefore, yet another case of one rule for the royals and another for everyone else, even if she does happen to be the world's most famous model?
A spokesperson for Burberry declines to comment, but perhaps Windsor's and Moss's different crisis management styles hold the key.
While Moss privately apologised to H&M in a bid to save her £500,000 contract with them, she stopped short of issuing a public apology for more than a week.
Windsor, however, was quick to recognise the eorror of his ways on having his drug escapades exposed by a redtop paper. He issued an immediate apology, on the same day, saying: 'I have rejected that side of my life and I'm going to commit myself to studies.'
Moss is clearly not so quick to swallow her pride.
Taken from today's Evening Standard London's Diary column.

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23-09-2005
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What I think is double standard, is everyone here has complained about Pete Doherty's drug abuse and it't effect on Kate for oh, so long, but when it comes out she actually does drugs, it's not a big deal. Then what's the fuss about him? There's a looong thread about him on this site, and how he is scum because of his drug abuse.

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23-09-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Odette
I just read the thing of Sienna Miller replacing Kate for Buberry ads.


I'd be shocked if they do that... for sure!

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23-09-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiny Dancer
What I think is double standard, is everyone here has complained about Pete Doherty's drug abuse and it't effect on Kate for oh, so long, but when it comes out she actually does drugs, it's not a big deal. Then what's the fuss about him? There's a looong thread about him on this site, and how he is scum because of his drug abuse.
There's no evidence that Ms. Moss is a serious drug addict.

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23-09-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrinceOfCats
There's no evidence that Ms. Moss is a serious drug addict.
Snorting 5 lines of cocaine in one sitting doesn't exactly label her an "amatour" druggie. She has to have done this in the past, and there's been plenty of evidence that there is no such thing as a "casual" snorter.

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23-09-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bun-bun
Snorting 5 lines of cocaine in one sitting doesn't exactly label her an "amatour" druggie. She has to have done this in the past, and there's been plenty of evidence that there is no such thing as a "casual" snorter.
You seem very well informed about the habits of cocaine addicts...

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23-09-2005
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Yeah, unfortunately I became involved romantically with a guy who was an addict of the stuff- possibly the worst mistake of my life.

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23-09-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bun-bun
Yeah, unfortunately I became involved romantically with a guy who was an addict of the stuff- possibly the worst mistake of my life.
That's what I used to say, but I've learn about that "mistake" so much, that I don't think it is a mistake anymore.

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23-09-2005
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I feel sorry for her, but on the other hand, she has t otake responsibilities for her sctions, which she is and is doing a good job of it!

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23-09-2005
  164
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The Times

If Cocaine Kate is a role model, please excuse my snorts of derision
Notebook by Mick Hume
THE CARRY-ON about Kate Moss, the cocaine-taking model, has at least helped to clear up the confusion about official attitudes to Class A drugs. We now know that it is no longer considered illegal or immoral to take cocaine at parties, nightclubs, fashion shows or just about anywhere else. However, it is deemed a heinous crime to be seen taking cocaine on the front page of a newspaper. After years of being glamorised and rewarded for pursuing her “party lifestyle”, it must have come as a shock to Ms Moss to realise that she is suddenly said to have done something wrong. Since the papers got hold of grainy photos of her apparently snorting coke, followed by further ripsnorting revelations about sex, drugs and rock’n’roll, she has transmogrified overnight from the “coolest chick on the planet” to a hot potato at the centre of a drug-fuelled moral panic.

Not only has Ms Moss been dropped by fashion labels that would have us believe her unwholesome behaviour is news to them, but a police investigation has been personally ordered by Sir Ian Blair, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. He announced that while the Met’s usual policy was to pursue dealers rather than users, this was “adaptable to the impact of events”. In other words, our PR-conscious police chief will change the rules in line with the news headlines. Welcome to Celebrity Drug Bust, the new reality TV show.



Commissioner Blair justified singling out Ms Moss for a crackdown not because of her private life but because of her public image: “We have to look at the impact of this kind of behaviour on impressionable young people and if there is evidence, something should be done about it.” When nobody seems sure where to draw the line on an issue like drugs, the one thing everybody can agree on is the need to protect the kiddies. The message from all sides is that Ms Moss must act as some sort of a role model.

This is the ridiculous end of the government-led crusade to try to turn every celebrity into a symbol of sobriety and good sense for our children. According to Tessa Jowell, the Culture Secretary, “it is important to remember that in public life you are a role model, for better or worse”. It is bad enough when they try to force infantile footballers into this mould. But anybody seriously suggesting that we might look up to Ms Moss in life as well as on the catwalk must be completely out of it.

I do not much care what models do with their inflated earnings. However, we could all do with less of the phoney outrage. If the crusaders are serious about outing cocaine users, they will have to close down the fashion and music industries for starters; it has even been suggested that some in the media and the Met might occasionally stop snorting with indignation long enough to snort something else. Most of all, let us kick the dodgy habit of expecting the assorted airheads of Planet Celebrity to teach “impressionable young people” how to behave. If we really have to look to a 31-year-old who dresses and acts like an adolescent to set an example to our children we are as lost as “Cocaine Kate”. Telling a fashion model to act as a role model is no more realistic than asking a clothes horse to run like a racehorse.

From the times UK website

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23-09-2005
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Kate Moss a role model? I don't think so
By Tom Utley
(Filed: 23/09/2005)

I'm afraid I wouldn't last long as a reporter on the Daily Mirror. If I had spotted Kate Moss taking what looked like cocaine at a party, it simply wouldn't have occurred to me that I was witnessing front-page news in the making - still less that I should tell my editor to hold pages one to five every day until further notice. "Supermodel scoffs doughnuts" - now that really would be a story. But "Supermodel snorts cocaine" ranks somewhere between "Dog bites man" and "Gardener mows lawn" on the Utley Scale of Earth-Shattering Revelations.

Sir Ian Blair, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, takes a more serious view of the Daily Mirror's scoop. He announced on Wednesday that he, personally, had been instrumental in launching an investigation into the paper's allegations. "We have to look at the impact of this kind of behaviour on impressionable young people and, if there is evidence, something should be done about it," he said.

You might think Britain's number one police officer would have something better to do with his time, in these days of international terrorism, than investigating a 31-year-old working mother for what must surely be one of the most common and least serious crimes on his patch.

I am sure that if Sir Ian put his mind to it, he could round up several dozen coke-snorting celebrities, any Saturday night of the year, simply by raiding a few parties in the trendier and more expensive parts of town. But I must not put ideas into his head.

You might also think that Moss had already paid a vastly higher price for her misbehaviour than the average London mugger ever has to pay for his. Since the Mirror's story appeared, she has lost at least three modelling contracts - worth, some say, more than £1 million. But Sir Ian now seems determined that she should also be slapped on the wrist by a magistrate.

I am not even sure if it is true that Moss is a role model for "impressionable young people". Certainly, a great many fashion designers are convinced that women look at what she is wearing and think: "If I bought that frock, then I, too, could look like Kate Moss." But does anybody actually believe, even on a subconscious level, "If only I took cocaine and hung out with junkies, then I, too, could be slim and beautiful and earn millions of pounds every year"?

I reckon Moss is no more a role model for the impressionable young than Sir Ian is a role model for middle-aged men. After all, very few of us go around in expensive, showy-off half-moon spectacles, demanding the power to administer summary "justice" to our fellow citizens, just because the Met Commissioner is so often on the telly.

It is not as if Moss actively sought to have her alleged drug-taking splashed all over the papers, day after day. She wasn't saying: "Look at me! I take coke! You should try some yourself!" Indeed, she has made much more effort than most famous people to keep herself to herself, and we have every reason to believe she would very much have preferred it if the Mirror had decided against telling impressionable young people that she took drugs.

I don't understand how prosecuting Moss will help. As far as I can see, it will serve only to keep the story in the news, and so to remind the impressionable young that their "role model" is believed to have a taste for cocaine. By announcing that his purpose in launching an investigation was to make an example of the woman, Sir Ian is sending out the message: "Don't worry. We are only prosecuting her because she is famous. If you're not famous, you can take as much coke as you like and get away with it."

This might be unfair, but I get the impression that Sir Ian is much more of a publicity-seeker than Moss. Perhaps this is one of the reasons he chose to intervene in her case, knowing that invoking her name would guarantee him wide coverage in the media. A shyer man would surely have thought twice about suggesting publicly that the police should be allowed to bypass the courts, imposing anti-social behaviour orders and confiscating people's cars, so soon after his men had shot and killed an innocent Brazilian electrician, in the mistaken belief that he was an Islamic terrorist. Sir Ian's own role in that tragedy - allowing the falsehood to get about, uncorrected, that the victim's dress and behaviour had attracted suspicion, and that he had jumped over the barriers at Stockwell Underground station - hardly inspires confidence in the wisdom or honesty of the police. If the top man behaves in this way, why should we trust his underlings to show better judgment when they take it into their heads to confiscate our cars?

What is clear is that the police cannot be bothered or trusted properly to enforce the law as it applies to narcotics. The whole issue is a complete muddle, for which legislators and the police must share the blame. How utterly crass it was of my own local force in Lambeth to decide not to prosecute people for smoking cannabis, but to pursue the drug's suppliers without mercy. There you have a perfect recipe for crime - boosting the rewards of drug-dealing by simultaneously stimulating demand and suppressing supply.

I don't pretend to have the answer. The libertarian in me says that almost all the harm done to innocent third parties by the drugs trade springs from its illegality - the muggings and burglaries in Lambeth by desperados seeking money for their next fix, and the utter misery inflicted on the people of Jamaica by the murderers who control the trade. The obvious answer, therefore, is to legalise the sale and use of narcotics. But then the father in me answers that almost nothing would distress me more than that one of my sons should become hooked on drugs. Keep them illegal, says Father Tom.

These are agonisingly complicated problems, and it is not for bears of little brain, like Sir Ian Blair, to make up the answers. Instead, the commissioner should get on with his job of tackling crime in the capital, even-handedly and according to the laws laid down by Parliament. Yesterday, it emerged that the average London policeman solves 11.49 crimes in the course of an entire year, which works out at less than one crime a month. Perhaps Sir Ian thinks that when he has prosecuted Kate Moss, with the help of the Daily Mirror, that will be his work done for the month.

Most of us Londoners think differently.



From telegraph.co.uk

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