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10-08-2008
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Kors Fragrance by Michael Kors
Ph: Fabien Baron
Model: Mariacarla Boscono



source:ma collection de pubs

----------------------

btw,i think this thread should be renamed " Fabien Baron - Artistic Director & Photographer "..

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Last edited by kasper!; 10-08-2008 at 03:00 AM.
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14-08-2008
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ANGLES IN AMERICA
The New York Times T Style Magazine Women's Fall 2008
Model: Sasha Pivovarova
Hair: Eugene Soulieman
Makeup: Carrasquillo
Stylist: Karl Templer
Photographer: Fabien Baron





source | screencaps by MMA from nytimes

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26-08-2008
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source | fashionweekdaily

Quote:
Zac Posen in a Bottle
Fabien Baron collaborates on designer's fragrance concept

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

(NEW YORK) Although Fabien Baron has been working extensively on the new Interview redesign, the creative genius hasn't quit his day job. The Daily has learned that the visionary has been busy designing the packaging and concept for Zac Posen's new perfume, which is being released by Selective Beauty. "Yes, we have been working on the bottle for Zac Posen," confirmed a spokesperson for Baron & Baron. The company, of course, has plenty of experience art directing for beauty brands. Baron oversaw the creative direction for best-selling scents from Calvin Klein, Burberry, Armani, Prada, Viktor & Rolf and Issey Miyake. "This wasn't a very difficult decision for Zac," said a source close to the Posen brand. "As soon as the perfume was planned, Fabien's name came up. He just has a tremendous amount of respect for him as a friend and a creative genius."

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27-08-2008
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Oh I love him!

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31-08-2008
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Interview September 2008
Editorial Directors Fabien Baron & Glenn O'Brien
Discuss the Latest Issue & the New Format
Blackberry to Blackberry



source | scanned by auxt

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31-08-2008
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DON'T BUG ME
Interview September 2008
Model: Raquel Zimmermann
Hair & Makeup: Mark Carasquillo
Stylist: Karl Templer
Photographer: Fabien Baron





source | scanned by jssy4eva

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31-08-2008
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that really bug me! i was wondering what is the intention by using the motorcrosser helmets??? but still he's genious!

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06-09-2008
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^ i think it's because it makes them look like bugs
the title ...

They should use the current fall accessories by Marni
Would go really well
Chunky and huge and insect-like
bracelets

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27-09-2008
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Source | The New York Times | by Cathy Horyn


MAKEOVER MAN Fabien Baron, fashion’s favorite art director, in his office at Baron & Baron.

Quote:
Fabien Baron: The Art Director as Star

It was early August, and Fabien Baron, the art director, was spending some time at his vacation home in rural Sweden, a minimalist farmhouse designed by the architect John Pawson and outfitted with similar restraint by Mr. Baron. Then there would be three weeks in Greece, followed by an end-of-summer visit to the Hamptons, where he also has a home.

Few art directors working in the fashion arena — in magazines, advertising, packaging and product design — are as successful as Mr. Baron. For a minimalist, he finds it hard to say no. Over the last 20 years, he has revamped five magazines, including Italian Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and, his latest, Interview, where he is also editorial director — a role that expands his influence at the top of the industry.

He has shaped the images of Calvin Klein and Burberry. He has created lucrative perfumes for half a dozen designers, including Giorgio Armani. And where many art directors confine themselves to page layouts and client logos, Mr. Baron has packaged himself. There is Fabien Baron Eyewear and Fabien Baron furniture for Cappellini.

Even his personal life seems crammed with a rococo complexity. He has three children from three different relationships. He has a son, Matthew, 20, a junior at Vassar, with his first wife, Heidi Siegel. He met his second wife, Sciascia Gambaccini, a fashion editor, when he was designing Italian Vogue in the late 1980s; they have a daughter, Ariel, 17. For the last 15 years he has lived with Malin Ericson, a striking Swedish woman whom he met at Bazaar. Mr. Baron and Ms. Ericson, who have a daughter, Eva, 8, recently separated.

When it was remarked that even in his romantic pursuits he was a workaholic, Mr. Baron, a robust man with a jowly face and a smooth head of hair, looked sheepish. His brown eyes softened.

“That’s all I do — work!” he said.

Mr. Baron, who turns 50 next year, certainly loves the work. “He is the modern version of Brodovitch,” said Michael Roberts, the fashion editor of Vanity Fair, referring to Alexey Brodovitch, the Russian émigré who was the art director of Bazaar from 1934 to 1958. Like Brodovitch, Mr. Baron floods his layouts with white space, favors bold, overlapping typefaces (often Didot), and treats photographs — and hence, their makers — like stars.

A son of a Parisian newspaper designer, he also brings a journalistic clarity to his pages. That’s what was missing, he said, with French Vogue, where he was art director from 2003 until this year, when he took over Interview. In terms of fashion, French Vogue’s stilettoed editor in chief, Carine Roitfeld, and her team were unbeatable — “they’re killers,” Mr. Baron said. But he felt the magazine lacked order. “I think I sharpened everything,” he said.

Mr. Baron first gained notice in the late 1980s, for his redesign of Italian Vogue and then Andy Warhol’s Interview — from which he was fired by its editor, Ingrid Sischy, after a handful of issues. But it was at Brodovitch’s magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, that he made his name. In 1992, Bazaar was a tired dog of a magazine when its new editor, Liz Tilberis, called him. At Vogue, Anna Wintour was driving to make her title the dominant fashion voice in America. At the smaller W, the creative director Dennis Freedman was building a distinct home for daring photography.

Such were the competitive pressures in New York. In a 1993 profile in The New Yorker, Mr. Baron implied that by joining Ms. Tilberis, a veteran British editor, he had in effect invited her into his “club.” Perhaps eager to demonstrate his clout, Mr. Baron also said in the article that he had brought in the star photographer Patrick Demarchelier. He recounted his pitch to Mr. Demarchelier, a friend: “It’s me and Leez, why don’t you come?”

But, according to Mr. Demarchelier, that conversation never took place. It was Mr. Demarchelier who brought Ms. Tilberis and Mr. Baron together. “She didn’t know who he was,” he said, adding, “He was trying to find work, actually.” (Mr. Baron admitted that his earlier statement was incorrect.)

Although Brodovitch was himself a photographer — Mr. Baron just released his own book of seascape photographs — he did not live long enough to glimpse the power, and the money, that would be available to the art directors of fashion magazines. Since 1992, Mr. Baron has built a substantial parallel business through his agency, Baron & Baron (a redundancy, since he is the only Baron on the 35-member staff), creating advertisements and packaging for designers. And of course those designers advertise in the magazines that he serves. From an aesthetic viewpoint, he said, “jumping around from commercial work to magazines to designing a perfume bottle helps you have a better understanding of what’s going on.”

The editors who have worked with Mr. Baron say he brings an incredible level of finesse to his layouts. But are they individual-looking? And does the “jumping around” sufficiently prepare him to now be an editor in chief? A number of art directors said that, despite the distinctiveness of his style, it doesn’t really change.

“I always get the sense he’s doing the same thing with every magazine,” said Luca Stoppini, the art director of Italian Vogue. Ms. Sischy said last week that this was essentially her objection, when she dismissed Mr. Baron. She pointed out that Warhol did not have an art director at Interview during the pivotal years of the early ’70s, giving the magazine a playful look.

“With Fabien’s design there was an overall sense of sameness, from article to article, and issue to issue, which is his strength, even his gift, but just not my preference,” she said. “While I admired how it brought a strong look to the magazine, I worried that it might sacrifice the thing that in my judgment made Interview special: a belief in the individual voice.”

Or course Mr. Baron now has Ms. Sischy’s job. But in any case he acknowledges that they didn’t see Interview the same way.

To be sure, Interview is not Vogue or Vanity Fair, though it has a special flavor, and Mr. Baron shares the duties of editorial director with Glenn O’Brien, a respected journalist. In February of this year, they succeeded Ms. Sischy following the decision of her domestic partner, Sandra Brant, who had operated Interview for nearly 20 years, to sell her 50 percent interest to her former husband, Peter Brant. She and Ms. Sischy then resigned, and Mr. Brant, a newsprint magnate who had initially wanted his ex-wife to buy his shares in Interview, hired Mr. Baron and Mr. O’Brien.

“I really had no interest in buying it,” Mr. Brant said. “Editorially, I didn’t agree with it, although I thought Ingrid was very competent.” He added that he liked the new editors’ ideas, as well as the potential for greater online exposure.

So far, the new issues are visually compelling, with a strong fashion and art component in the September issue, which featured Kate Moss on the cover. “I feel it’s my point of view, and it has Glenn’s view in it,” Mr. Baron said. “People buy into personality. And you need to be bolder.” But, as some of his fellow editors said in Milan last week, magazines have a density of experience that depends as much on curiosity and dislikes as much as a singular point of view.

“This is something that Anna Wintour has, whether you like American Vogue or not,” Mr. Roberts said. “She’s willing to put things in her magazine she’s not comfortable with. Is Fabien willing to put his dislikes, as well as his likes, into his magazine?” Even with a strong editorial partner, Mr. Roberts also questioned if Mr. Baron can manage this new role with his other interests. “You can’t be a part-time fantastic editor in chief of a magazine,” he said.

Mr. Baron wasn’t upset when told of these comments. “I think human beings are capable of doing many things during their lives,” he said. Later, though, he said, a little defensively, “I think a lot of people would like to see me fail.”

In many ways, Mr. Baron presents the opposite type of the industry he dominates. “He’s slightly naïve,” says Karl Templer, the creative director of Interview, who has known Mr. Baron for years. “He’ll say, ‘Oh, that looks good.’ Or, ‘Look at the clouds. Aren’t they funny looking.’ He’s a child.”

But he can’t be surprised if editors like Ms. Wintour use their power to block his access to photographers. That’s what editors are supposed to do.

It may be, finally, that the reason Mr. Baron wants to run his own magazine is as simple and direct — and maybe a little naïve — as his beautiful pages. “Because I was born into newspapers and magazines,” he said. “I like the pace of it. It’s my Achilles tendon.”

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28-09-2008
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Thanks for the article and interview, MMA. Now I'm very intersted in this man. They are helpful for me.

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31-05-2009
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Is he creating a new magazine, i heard some rumors!

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01-06-2009
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W Magazine - October 2002
Editorial: "Bacchanal"
Models: Brad Kroenig, Gisele Bündchen, Jacquetta Wheeler, Leticia Birkheuer, Mariacarla Boscono and unknowns
Ph.: Fabien Baron

Scanned by GUGA/MODA



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11-11-2009
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http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-a...zine-whisperer

Quote:
The Magazine Whisperer
by Jacob Bernstein


Fabien Baron has redesigned some of the most famous publications in the world, including Harper’s Bazaar and French Vogue. He talks to Jacob Bernstein about reinventing Andy Warhol’s Interview and doing a new book with Madonna.

Fabien Baron’s office on New York's Hudson Street is the cleanest thing you’ve ever seen. There’s a flat-screen TV on the wall in the waiting room and a couple of loveseats to sit on, but everything is white. The walls are white. The seats are white. The coffee table is white. It’s almost like a doctor’s office, except that the man who works here with his staff of 35 doesn’t diagnose illnesses: He cures design problems.

For nearly 20 years, Baron has been among the most successful art directors in fashion, presiding over ad campaigns for Calvin Klein, Burberry, and Giorgio Armani, as well as overseeing the looks of four of the most famous fashion magazines in the world. In the 1980s, Baron and Franca Sozzani turned Italian Vogue into a laboratory for edgy, experimental photography. In the ’90s, he took over Harper’s Bazaar with Liz Tilberis and helped usher in the minimalistic aesthetic that came to dominate fashion. Then, in 2003, Carine Roitfeld brought Baron aboard to redesign French Vogue and it became (despite its small readership) perhaps the most influential fashion publication in the world. And in 2008, when Ingrid Sischy and Sandy Brant sold their stakes in Interview to Brant’s ex-husband, Peter, it was Baron who once again got the call to reinvent Andy Warhol’s magazine.

Baron’s Interview is a product that looks and feels less like a magazine than a coffee table book, which is exactly what the designer, 50, was going for. “You have to offer something that feels produced, because that’s what you cannot have on Internet,” Baron says in his trademark patois, dropping the “the” before Internet. “You have to reinforce all the good things magazines are there for and eliminate everything else.” Consequently, he’s upped the trim size of the magazine (it is now comparable to V and W), cleaned up the design, and filled Interview with pages and pages of impeccably styled fashion photographs (and very expensive clothes).

Still, for an art director whose design aesthetic is pristine, his early months at the magazine were rather messy. Shortly after he was hired, Baron (and the magazine’s fashion director, Karl Templer) quit after clashing with Interview’s editor Glenn O’Brien. Soon after that, O’Brien left and Baron was brought back.

Certainly the most recent issue, a 40th-anniversary special with Kristen Stewart on the cover, doesn’t indicate a magazine in turmoil. It carried almost 100 pages of ads and virtually every top-tier fashion brand signed on, including Louis Vuitton, Versace, Dolce & Gabbana, and Prada.
But hurdles remain. According to Baron, the biggest two are budget constraints and getting photographers to shoot in an era when nearly every top talent is under contract with Condé Nast. “Even the photographers who aren’t locked up have been locked up,” he says. “People are worried that if they work for us, they’re not going to work for Vogue. (Or W, the other Condé Nast fashion magazine that Interview seems most clearly to be taking a run at.)

From time to time, Baron has also had to deflect some criticism in publishing circles that Interview under his leadership is gorgeous, while being somewhat unreadable. For display type, he favors giant capital letters that are crammed together. The articles often feature a font so small even a teenager with 20/20 could have trouble reading them. “I’m very aware of this,” says Baron. “It’s possible it’s a little bit harder to read. But you get so much more. You get the beauty, you get organization, and you get an experience that you would not get if I made it totally legible.”

If Baron doesn’t seem overly concerned with the words in his magazine, that might be because he’s a visual person who comes as much from an advertising sensibility as an editorial one. After growing up in Paris (where his father was a magazine art director), he moved to New York in the early 1980s and got a job as an assistant art director at GQ. He moved from there to an ill-fated startup called New York Woman, then took over at Italian Vogue and began doing Barneys’ groundbreaking ad campaigns with the photographer Steven Meisel and models Linda Evangelista and Naomi Campbell.

Since then, he’s been known for his prodigious use of white space (there's an almost arctic chill to everything he designs) and a tendency to align himself with projects that pushed sexual boundaries. The Calvin Klein “kiddie porn” spread? That would be one of his most famous campaigns. Madonna’s Sex book? He did the art direction. Baron’s said to be working on another coffee table book with the singer now—a massive retrospective of the queen of reinvention as photographed over the years by everyone from Herb Ritts to Steven Klein. “I’m not sure I’m supposed to talk about it yet,” he says, with characteristic self-restraint.

Despite having worked in fashion for decades, Baron purports to be a little flummoxed by the reaction some of his work gets here in the United States. In 2008, a Calvin Klein ad with a naked Eva Mendes was banned from U.S. television. A little while later, the company also generated controversy with a billboard that hinted at group sex. “Ten years ago, it was easier to do something than it is today,” Baron says. “People get offended by imagery way more than they used to. The Eva Mendes commercial I did? Honestly, you look at it and it’s not offensive at all. But they got letters and complaints. ‘Overtly sexual’ is what they called it. This country has become quite uptight. It’s, like, come on. I know the '60s are far away, but in Europe the same image doesn’t even get mentioned. They don’t care.”

Much as Baron doesn’t seem to care about the church-state divide between advertising and editing, he has even stepped behind the lens and done some fashion photography. Given that it’s basically a hobby for him, the results have been very well received. The late New York Times fashion critic Amy Spindler called his 2000 “Primal Scream” spread in W her favorite fashion editorial of the year. In the most recent issue of Interview, Baron photographed polo player and Ralph Lauren model Nacho Figueras, who then sits for a Q & A with the publication’s polo-playing owner Peter Brant. Says Bob Colacello, a former editor of Interview and friend of the Brants: “I told Peter he should put Nacho on the cover because he’s glamorous and it will get them a lot of Ralph Lauren advertising.” In the end, Baron apparently decided just to go with an inside spread, though it seems unlikely anyone had to twist his arm to do the shoot. Asked what brand he’d most like to work with but hasn’t yet, he says simply, “Ralph Lauren.”

Perhaps for his next act.

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06-01-2010
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Im a huge fan!

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ARENA HOMME +
Autumn/Winter 1999

Techno, Techno, Techno
Photographed by Fabien Baron





l scanned by me l

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