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19-08-2007
  16
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^^i like how vibrant those colors are...
especially in the second and third examples

thanks for posting them

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21-08-2007
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waterproofing textile
Love that video on processing linen It looks so nice, smooth and shiny like hair in the end...

If anyone is interested... I found out some ideas for waterproofing textiles, as noted in my post #10 about the first post of the thread on the 'fine gum and resinous varnish' for waterproofing and strengthening the kapa fabric.
I guess there are several ways
I remember I used to study papier-mâché in high school; and I read about people coating the paper with linseed oil and drying it in the oven. It makes it strong and impervious to water (not completely waterproof, but it helps).
And last night I started finding more articles on using oil to waterproof textiles.. and also found out resin is actually made from a substance found in trees. Both resin and gum can come from natural sources. Guar gum for example is used in papers as sizing (preventing ink from bleeding when you write on the paper), among other things.

Waterproof coat made of paper


Quote:
Catalogue no:
42924
Botanical classification:
MORACEAE Broussonetia kazinokii
Donor:
Sir Harry Parkes
Donor date:
1874
Geographical origin:
Japan


This oiled paper coat is waterproof. Several paper items in the Parkes collection, including sandal covers and a coat, were oiled by their makers in order to make them resistant to the rain. Imagine what happens to a normal piece of paper when it gets wet. That the Japanese developed a technique to make waterproof clothing out of paper is remarkable. It is said that these items even resemble leather in appearance.
kew.org

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21-08-2007
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Bark cloth
more on bark cloth .. (a.k.a. kapa, tapa, etc)
more info + pictures at the link below

Jacket made of bark cloth


Quote:
....a versatile material made from beaten tree bark, once used widely in the Pacific Islands and Indonesia . Bark cloth comes primarily from trees of the Moraceae family, including Broussonetia papyrifera, Artocarpus altilis, and Ficus spp. It is made by beating strips of the fibrous inner bark of these trees into sheets, which are then finished into a variety of items.

The main use of bark cloth is for clothing. The Collections at Kew illustrate the amazing ability of this beaten tree bark to form soft and delicate items of apparel. Examples include shawls, loincloths, headdresses, skirts, dresses, shirts, and even a tight fitting jacket. Bark cloth has not just been worn, however, but has also been used as a wrapping for the deceased, a dowry, a room partition, and a mosquito screen. The cloth has played an important role in the societies of the South Pacific, being incorporated into folklore, religion, culture, and ritual. It has been popular in ritual gift exchange, in everyday trading and in healing ceremonies, and it has been used to symbolise status and wealth, with the level of decoration, the style of wearing, and the amount of cloth worn signifying rank. In Tahiti , for example, the upper class wore the ‘ahutara’ or shawl over their shoulders, while the lower classes wore one rectangle tucked around the body and under the arms so the shoulders were exposed to passing superiors. Meanwhile, in Fiji the length of a man’s loincloth symbolised his rank. A chief’s loincloth would drag on the ground, while a poor man’s loincloth would drape over his belt as little as possible.


Each region in the Pacific developed its own unique methods of production, style of wearing and design. The Economic Botany Collections at Kew have examples from a wide geographical range, including Pitcairn, Hawaii, Tahiti, the Cook Islands, Samoa, Futuna, Tonga, Fiji, the Solomon Islands, Sulawesi, Halamahera, Seram, New Guinea, and Java. The samples cover the many diverse uses, designs and styles of bark cloth, and are the result of a number of private collectors and colonial expeditions in the 19th century, from HRH the Duke of Edinburgh to the mutineers of the HMS Bounty. Most of the examples at Kew date from the late 19th century. The production of bark cloth slowed considerably in the 20th century, eventually dying out in all but a few islands as missionaries from the west visited the Pacific, bringing with them western ideas and goods such as cotton textiles. In fact, it became a sign of a convert to wear cotton, rather than bark cloth.
kew.org

for Bark cloth in the Philippines...
http://class.csueastbay.edu/anthropo...s/Textiles.htm

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Last edited by gius; 21-08-2007 at 05:28 PM.
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21-08-2007
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waterproofing textile pt. 2
waterproof textile pt. 1 is here

Quote:
Victorian Papier Mache


English Victorian Papier Mache chair

The Victorians loved to experiment with new materials and one of their favourites was papier mache. By the time Queen Victoria came to the throne, there were at least 25 companies producing papier mache items.
The most common pieces are trays, workboxes, inkstands, face screens, snuff boxes and letter holders. Eventually they moved on to larger items and furniture such as firescreens, chairs and tables, bookcases – even wardrobes and beds!
Nearly always the characteristic black, but occasionally in red or green, the pieces were very ornately decorated with flowers, birds and patterns – frequently embellished in gold. Some of the finer pieces were inlaid with shimmering mother-of-pearl shell.
Jennings and Bettridge are the name most people associate with this period. The Birmingham company had shops in New York as well as London; producing some of the finest papier mache items of all time. Many are now prized collector’s items or museum pieces today.


Papier Mache Production

The making of papier mache items, in particular the pieces of furniture, involved many hours of work and relied upon an almost limitless supply of cheap labour. Very large sheets of black paper were pasted on both sides and firmly pressed over greased moulds. (After having been dipped in large shallow vats of tar spirit and linseed oil). Care was taken to smooth out the surface and remove any trapped air bubbles.
After 2 or 3 layers had been applied, the edges would be trimmed and the item baked in a hot oven. The object would be built up in this way, continually repeating the three layers and baking until the final thickness was met. Some articles had as many as 100 layers of paper by the time they were finished!
Once thoroughly dry, the item was saturated in linseed oil and baked in a very hot oven for many hours to make it hard and water-resistant.
Details of chair


Close-up showing the detail of the mother-of-pearl inlay



Close-up of gold decoration on top of leg



Close-up of decoration at the base of the chair back

papiermache.co.uk

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Last edited by gius; 21-08-2007 at 05:35 PM.
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27-08-2007
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...inspired by the mention of 'mud-dying' above.

Quote:
Bogolanfini Mud Cloth

In recent years the stark black and white designs of Bogolanfini have become, along with kente, one of the best known African cloth traditions around the world. Bogolanfini, which translates as "mud cloth", is a long established tradition among the Bamana, a Mande speaking people who inhabit a large area to the east and north of Bamako in Mali. The production of Bogolan cloth involves a unique and lengthy procedure, which we can only outline here. The raw material is provided by plain white cotton cloth woven by men in narrow strips on the local version of the double heddle loom. The plain cloth that is to be turned into bogolan is first sewn up into a woman's wrapper cloth or whatever other garment the customer requires.

Although men in Bamako have taken up a simplified form of bogolan dyeing in recent years, in the Beledougou area it remains primarily a women's craft passed on from mother to daughter. The cloth is first washed in water and allowed to dry so that it can shrink to its final size. It is then soaked in a brown solution made from the pounded leaves of certain trees. Although the main leaves used are widely known, specialists have their own precise closely guarded recipes to give the best results. Once the cloth has been soaked in the mixture it takes on a deep even yellow colour which fades only slightly when it is spread out on the ground to dry in the sun. It is now ready for the mud dye to be applied. The mud used is collected from ponds and left to ferment in a covered pot for about a year, during which time it becomes black.

Small pieces of bamboo and flat metal spatula of various widths are used to draw the design onto the cloth using the mud solution. When all the designs have been drawn in outline she then uses a wider implement to fill in the mud dye over the spaces left between them. One of the unique features of high quality bogolan is that it is the background not the designs themselves that are painted onto the cloth leaving the design in the remaining undyed areas. It can take several weeks of slow and painstaking work before the whole cloth is covered. The cloth is then washed with water to remove any excess mud leaving a black background from which the yellow designs stand out. The whole process of dipping the cloth in the leaf solution and outlining the designs with a layer of black mud dye is then repeated, giving the cloth a second coating of dye. The final stage is to apply a solution that includes caustic soda to the yellow areas so that they are bleached to the desired white. It would seem strange to begin with a white cloth, dye it to yellow, then finish up by treating the yellow areas so they become white again. The reason for this apparently paradoxical procedure lies in the chemical processes at work in the dyeing process. The active ingredient in the mud dye is iron oxide, which is converted by tannic acid in the leaf solution into a fast dye of iron tannate. The yellow stage is therefore essential although as a colour it is not present on the finished cloth.

Below: The artist carefully traces over the undyed areas to bleach out the yellow ground dye.


Quote:
Within the local tradition of bogolan cloth making in the countryside north of the Malian capital of Bamako it does not appear that artists were usually expected to produce innovatory designs. Rather the mark of a successful design was the reproduction of existing designs clearly, and perhaps in some novel but appropriate combination. Many of the individual motifs applied to sections of the cloth, or combinations of these motifs, have names. Some of these names are based on the appearance of the pattern, such as "fish bones", "little stars", or "square". A common pattern of a cross shape set diagonally within a square is called "Mauretanian woman's head-cushion" after the expensive embroidered leather cushions such women own and has implications of both femininity and wealth. A few designs have names which refer to aspects of women's daily experience, in particular to issues such as co-wives rivalry within polygamous households.

In the years since 1980 bogolan has gone from being an obscure if interesting local textile tradition to become an internationally recognised symbol of African style. This surprising new role for bogolan has its roots with two developments in Bamako involving local fine artists and fashion designers. At the art schools in Bamako young artists began to experiment with and research the technique as part of an ideological commitment to the use of local materials in their work. These moves lead in the 1980s to the formation of a collective of six artists calling themselves Groupe Bogolan Kasobane, who went on to exhibit widely in Europe and Francophone Africa a variety of both abstract and representational paintings that utilised the bogolan technique. The pioneer of the use of bogolan in fashion design was a Malian designer Chris Seydou working in Paris. After attracting much interest with a wrap of bogolan in his 1979 show he rapidly increased the use of the fabric through the 1980s and early '90s. When wealthy Bamako customers saw the new styles he was creating using the fabric, and realised how much interest it was attracting abroad, the response was enthusiastic. Seydou, before his early death in 1994, promoted bogolan through annual fashion shows on Malian television and worked with local textile factories to develop industrially manufactured versions of the mud cloth designs.

In response to this new interest young unemployed men and students in Bamako began to produce simplified versions of classic rural Bogolan designs, and experimented with new designs and colours. At the same time the laborious and time consuming processes needed to produce traditional bogolan were becoming rarer and rarer in the countryside, making old style bogolan increasingly difficult to obtain. Drawing on their roots in the rural Bamana tradition the best examples of the new Bogolon styles display a creative flair all their own. Their colour palette of rich browns, blacks, and white, is particularly suited to interior decoration, looking good as a drape, wall hanging, cushion cover, or furniture throw in homes across the US and Europe.

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27-08-2007
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Quote:
Kuba Cloth: Playing with Geometry - Kuba cloth, the magnificent embroidered and applique fabric of the Kuba people, is the best-known example of the ancient African tradition of raffia cloth weaving.

A Trend-Setting Art Form
Weaving, embroidery, appliqué; and other textile techniques have long been staples of African artistry. In the past, European nobility displayed raffia cloth in curio cabinets as prime examples of African artistry. More recently, the masterful abstract patterning displayed in Kuba cloth served as a source of inspiration to artists such as Klee, Picasso, and Braque. Matisse was such a fan that he displayed pieces of his extensive Kuba cloth collection on the walls of his studio.

Symbols in the After-Life
The ceremonial occasions and court rituals that embroidered raffia cloth were originally produced for are rare events today.The survival of raffia weaving and embroidery techniques is tied to the importance these cloths play in today's funeral celebrations. The Kuba believe that high quality, correctly patterned raffia dress is key to being recognized by clan ancestors in the land of the dead, so families accumulate the cloths and pass them down through the generations.

Creating Kuba Cloth
The basic unit of Kuba weaving is the undecorated square of plain raffia cloth, the mbal, woven by men on an upright single-heddle loom. Although men sometimes decorate the cloth they weave, only women produce the most laborious and prestigious type of cloth decoration, cut-pile embroidery.

It takes about a month of regular work for a woman to complete a small square of kuba embroidery using a laborious technique that includes dying, detailed needlework and clipping individual tufts. Except for novices, designs are created as the crafter proceeds, usually elaborating a new combination from the more than 200 familiar patterns known designs, most which are identified by name. The same patterns are used on other Kuba art forms, including wood sculpture, metalworking, mat making, and women's body scarification.

Although the regular interlacing on the background cloth promotes a regular and symmetrical design, Kuba artists favor an improvisational, fluid effect that plays with deliberate asymmetries and pattern variation, creating the exquisite workmanship that distinguishes this native art form.

Below: Ensemble, late 19th century, African (Kuba peoples). Raffia fiber, harvested from the palm leaf, is used in almost all Kuba textiles and is a powerful emblem of security and continuity, symbolizing the bond of the living to each other as well as to the deceased. The intricately pieced checkerboard pattern and large size of this skirt reveal the prominent social status of the wearer.




africanconservancy.org . metmuseum.org

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15-09-2007
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Temari




Quote:
While an ancient Japanese Temari is said to be originating from Kemari (kickball type game) and originally coming from China and made from deer hide during the Asuka period, Temari (hand ball) called Onna Mari were used by women in the royal court castle to show off and compete with their kagari (stitching skills) to gain the attention and favor of their favorite princes. The temari used to be made with kakagari (using silk threads) among the upper class, but when cotton threads became readily available in modern times, regular/common people began making them using cotton thread. Temari made in this way spread to many areas of Japan and each area established its own recognizable style. Temari is a traditional, highly artistic culture and skill in that each design shows the unique characteristics of the maker's free ideas and creativity.
You can find step by step instructions and examples and all sorts of fun information at the source. I know what I'm going to make for holiday ornaments this year...

www.temarikai.com

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20-09-2007
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those are cool!

looks so labor intensive..
i wouldn't have the patience
or maybe i would

very cool idea for some custom-made ornaments though, like you said

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22-09-2007
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They're very cool, those balls
and you know, the thread used is continuous
So like the red lines you see in the last one, they have been wrapped all over the ball... it's not just a red line stitched on top...
Quite complex, I have to say

Love your posts, SomethingElse

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22-09-2007
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Dyeing with Turmeric

Turmeric has been used as a dye (and spice) for hundreds of years. Popular in many parts of Asia, especially India. You can see Buddhist monks wearing robes in this yellow colour-- this is what they use to dye the robes.

dept.kent.edu
It's prone to fading, due to its instability to light and alkali conditions, but it remains a popular dye even till now because of the intensity of the yellow it can produce.
In India, after dyeing, it can be dipped in a rinse acid bath of lemon juice or mango skins to help make it fast to the fabric. Also pomegranate rind is used along dyeing because the tannin in the rind helps fix the colour onto the fabric as well...

For those who don't know, turmeric is part of the ginger family
My friend and I recently dyed some wool, linen, raw silk, nylon and hemp in turmeric. I posted it here http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...ml#post3549027
We made two sets: one with a mordant and one without
You actually don't need a mordant for this but we wanted to test it to see if there was any change; and our yellow shades did get a bit darker with the mordant

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Last edited by gius; 22-09-2007 at 03:23 PM.
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29-05-2008
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Tribal Cloth Enthusiasts
Some might so precious whilst others being forgoten. Designers, artists, even football players seem to cling these heritage for once in a while. Let's show our glorious cloth designs and technics from all over the World!

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30-05-2008
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On the Shade: these are Tenun (weave) and Ikat Cloth from Indonesia. From the most intricated double Ikat, Gringsing to pixelated games-like sarong from Nusa Tenggara. enjoy!

source: member's own collection
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P1070131.jpg (131.3 KB, 71 views)
File Type: jpg P1070120.jpg (91.1 KB, 72 views)
File Type: jpg P1070122.jpg (127.5 KB, 72 views)
File Type: jpg P1070128.jpg (91.4 KB, 72 views)
File Type: jpg P1070130.jpg (100.4 KB, 72 views)


Last edited by gius; 02-06-2008 at 12:16 AM. Reason: added credits
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30-05-2008
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Hello gandrasta
I hope you are settling in well at tFS ...

I combined your thread with this one
It's about handcrafts from different countries, techniques... Can be fabrics, woodwork, anything
Please do a search next time, before starting a new thread

You might also be interested in these threads:
Ethnic Fashion
contemporary Textile Design
and Repeating Patterns in Wallpapers/textiles

Cheers!

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31-05-2008
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Dear giuseppe.. huge thx . and thx too for your comment on my blog

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31-05-2008
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You're welcome ^

What is the last fabric? It looks like shiny denim...
and there are bright blue threads floating on top of it...

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