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20-12-2008
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Marvystone's Avatar
 
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Photographers : Then & Now
This is a thread to post about and discuss (non fashion related) photographers and their work..

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Photography is the result of combining several technical discoveries. Long before the first photographs were made, Chinese philosopher Mo Ti described a pinhole camera in the 5th century B.C.E, Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen) (965–1040) studied the camera obscura and pinhole camera, Albertus Magnus (1139-1238) discovered silver nitrate, and Georges Fabricius (1516-1571) discovered silver chloride. Daniel Barbaro described a diaphragm in 1568. Wilhelm Homberg described how light darkened some chemicals (photochemical effect) in 1694. The fiction book Giphantie (by the French Tiphaigne de la Roche, 1729-1774) described what can be interpreted as photography.
For years images have been projected onto surfaces. According to the Hockney–Falco thesis as argued by artist David Hockney, some artists used the camera obscura and camera lucida to trace scenes as early as the 16th century. However, this theory is heavily disputed by today's contemporary realist artists who are able to create high levels of realism without optical aids. These early cameras did not record an image, but only projected images from an opening in the wall of a darkened room onto a surface, turning the room into a large pinhole camera. The phrase camera obscura literally means dark chamber. While this early prototype of today's modern camera may have had modest usage in its time, it was an important step in the evolution of the invention.

Wikipedia

National geographic also has an interesting time line of photography

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20-12-2008
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one of my favourites by Man Ray

technique: rayograph
Objects are placed on light-sensitive film
and then exposed to light



britannica.com

His thread is here: Man Ray

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20-12-2008
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here's another...



technique: solarisation
Quote:
from wikipedia
Solarization refers to a phenomenon in physics where a material undergoes a temporary change in color after being subjected to high energy electromagnetic radiation, such as ultraviolet light or X-rays. Clear glass and many plastics will turn amber, green or other colors when subjected to X-radiation, and glass may turn blue after long term solar exposure in the desert. It is believed that solarization is caused by the formation of internal defects, called color centers, which selectively absorb portions of the visible light spectrum. Solarization may also permanently degrade a material's physical or mechanical properties, and is one of the mechanisms involved in the breakdown of plastics within the environment.
The term solarization is also used to describe sterilisation of soil or plant material by cooking the material in a plastic bag. In this case the sun's radiation is converted to heat by absorption, heating the material above 60 C, which kills off most harmful pathogens. The UV in the light may also have a germicidal effect on the surface material.

scans by StellaMare
-book: Man Ray by Taschen

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20-12-2008
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same technique
same source



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20-12-2008
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Eve Arnold

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In 1951, Arnold was one of the very few women to join Magnum as an associate. This happened as a result of the fact that Brodovitch found her work fresh and encouraged her to keep on photographing in Harlem. Arnold became a member of Magnum later on in 1955. From then on she worked on numerous reportages for Life, Vogue, Paris Match, Stern and the Sunday Times, traveling in Europe, the US, South America, India and Afghanistan on assignment and working in-depth in the USSR on three successive trips. She became famous for her portraits of celebrities including Marilyn Monroe, Marlene Dietrich, John Huston, Clark Gable, Joan Crawford, the Queen of England, Richard Nixon, Senator Joseph McCarthy and Malcolm X. Her book of memoirs on the 1950’s, published with her own text, explores the growing prominence of media on society.
In 1961 she moved to London. At the beginning of the 1970’s Eve photographed the life of veiled women in Egypt, Afghanistan and Abu Dhabi, and then the South African apartheid. In 1979 Eve Arnold traveled to China for another photographic documentary, where she received a National Book Award an year later. After shooting in Britain and the USA Eve has traveled back to Cuba, documenting the descendants of families she had photographed there three decades ago.
The most important prizes include:
Kraszna Krausz award for the best book of photography for “In Retrospect”
International Center of Photography’s master photographer award for lifetime achievement.
text thanks to photoaxe


George Lincoln Rockwell (center), Head of the American Nazi Party, at Black Muslim Meeting, Washington, D. C.,1960
national galleries


Eve Arnold on the left.
magnum photos


Joan Crawford, member of the Board of Pepsi-Cola, New York City, 1959
siegelproductions


On the set of 'the misfits'
dailyapple




both from photo axe


Marilyn Monroe with Arthur Miller, 1960
nytimes


The Republican National Convention, 1952
slate~todays pictures


Supporter of Barry Goldwater presidential candidate, 1964
magnumphotos


Malcom X, 1961
magnumphotos


China, 1979
magnumphotos


Horse training for the militia, Mongolia, 1979


Joan Crawford fixing eyelashes, Hollywood, 1959


Isabela Rosselini during filming of 'White Nights', Finland, 1984


Voodoo Child, Haiti, 1956
last four photos from david gallery

Quite a few more great photos by Eve here.

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20-12-2008
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Tokihiro Sato

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Recognized for his playful interaction of light, Satō uses a large-format camera set for long exposures that last from one to three hours, while he dances through the described space creating points of light or illuminated lines drawn with flashlights or flashes made by reflecting mirrors. The end results with detailed photographs interrupted by patterns of light. And because of the long exposures, Satō’s movements across the scene remain undetectable by the camera. So the photograph captures his presence but not his image.









melnitsa

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23-12-2008
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very good thread, thank you !!

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05-01-2009
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good thread!

Thomas Demand


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Photographs can seem convincingly real or strangely artificial. The work of German photographer Thomas Demand achieves a disquieting balance between the two. Born in 1964, Demand began as a sculptor and took up photography to record his ephemeral paper constructions. In 1993 he turned the tables, henceforth making constructions for the sole purpose of photographing them. Demand begins with a preexisting image culled from the media, usually of a political event, which he translates into a life-size model made of colored paper and cardboard. His handcrafted facsimiles of architectural spaces and natural environments are built in the image of other images. Thus, his photographs are triply removed from the scenes or objects they purport to depict. Once they have been photographed, the models are destroyed. Demand recently began to make 35mm films, setting his cinematic still images in motion. Combining craftsmanship and conceptualism in equal parts, Demand pushes the medium of photography toward uncharted frontiers. His originality has won him recognition as one of the most innovative artists of his generation.
moma.org

I love his work, so cold and lifeless but intriguing at the same time. It's a shame that seeing them in the computer screen doesn't do them justice.

Embassy series (2007)

embassy1.jpg embassy2.jpg embassy3.jpg embassy4.jpg embassy4a.jpg embassy5.jpg embassy6.jpg embassy7.jpg embassy7a.jpg
all pictures from Sprüth Magers

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05-01-2009
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The slickness in Man Ray's photographs leaves me in awe!

Here's one of my favorites...
Robert Mapplethorpe.
I think he captures his subjects so very well, whether he's photographing flowers, objects or people. His photos look so simple yet evoke so much emotion.







Left to right:
Self Portrait 1980
Alice Neel, 1984
Self Portrait, 1975
Orchid, 1985
Andy Warhol, 1986
Skull, 1988
Tim Scott, 1980
Iggy Pop, 1981
Calla Lily, 1984

edinphoto.co.uk, artnet.com, mapplethorpe.org, nymag.com

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28-02-2009
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Quote:
Masahisa Fukase (深瀬 昌久 ,Fukase Masahisa, born 1934) is a renowned Japanese photographer.
While his first works seemed to bring little interest, his second series of photos of his wife brought him acclaim with his joyous and lively shots.
His greatest and last photobook was "Raven". Shot in Hokkaido in 1976 in the wake of his divorce, the gloomy and emotional photos are a sharp contrast to his earlier works. The enormous renown won by their release in 1986 then the American release ("The Solitude of the Raven") in 1991 was short lived as he fell down a flight of stairs while intoxicated and into a coma which he remains in today.





















artpages.org.ua


photoeye

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05-05-2009
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good thread!
are there still any established professional photographers using film?

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16-05-2009
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^Bruce Webber does, I think Wim Wenders does...it's hard because there are still quite a few but I wouldn't call them 'established professional' photogs..



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17-05-2009
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i think film is more common with black and white photography nowadays. i've spoke with a couple of photographers and photo specialty shops, and a lot say colour film developing is quite expensive and becoming unnecessary when you can get quicker results when developed digitally. but there is this nice grain and interesting effects which come with film.. so some people stick with it

i believe photographers sarah moon and karl lagerfeld use film

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04-08-2009
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Albert Renger-Patzsch

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Renger-Patzsch’s work was distinguished by a detached, almost scientific objectivity and precise attention to detail. His 1928 book The World is Beautiful, which juxtaposed images of the natural and the industrial to bring out their underlying similarities, established Renger-Patzsch as one of the leading figures in the New Objectivity movement. In 1929, he began a series of studies of the Ruhr Valley, including mines, factories and workers’ accommodation - subjects that few photographers had considered worthy of attention. Renger-Patzsch’s sober style matched his subject matter: the bleak non-places at the edge of the industrial landscape.
tate.org.uk

Attachment 469938 Attachment 469939 Attachment 469940 64_167_img_162192.jpg Attachment 469941 Attachment 469942 64_158_img_6994537.jpg renger_patzsch01.jpg renger_patzsch51.jpg artwork_images_115950_424618_albert-renger-patzsch.jpg
1/2. Schubert & Salzer factory, Ingolstadt, Germany (1950s) 3. Schwarzkiefern im Park von Wilhelshohe (1947) 4. Buchen auf Einer Schwarzwalder Bergweide (c. 1950) 5/6/7. Ruhrchemie factory, Oberhausen-Holten, Germany (1933-34) all from from zabriskiegallery.com
8.
Lasthaken mit Stahltrosse (1924) 9.Cactaceae Mammilaria (1926) from jmcfaber.at
10.
Ruhrlandschaften, Hafenabstraktion (c. 1928) from artnet.com

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05-08-2009
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loves this thread, and see all this pictures really give me some reference for my artwork

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