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04-09-2007
  31
a hymn to darkness
 
wheneveriwakeup's Avatar
 
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The 'Dandelion Clock' and 'Pile of Flowers' prints are fantastic!

Thanks for the wonderful pictures guys!

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26-09-2007
  32
V.I.P.
 
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soo glad i found this thread ive got to do an essay on prints in fashion for college this is so usefulll thanks for starting this thread

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01-10-2007
  33
front row
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingElse View Post
These are from Thibaut which has been in business since 1886.

*Please remember to not quote pictures*
Chinese Laundry

Window Shopping

Birdcage

thibautdesign.com
If those were wallpapers I would use them to cover the walls for my future kids


Last edited by gius; 02-10-2007 at 01:47 AM. Reason: see tFS Guidelines.
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03-10-2007
  34
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^ Wallpaper and fabric, so you can coordinate to your heart's content!

These are all from William Morris.

Quote:
"Bird" c. 1878. This pattern was registered in 1878; Morris designed it for the walls of the drawing room of his family home, Kelmscott House, in the Hammersmith area of London, which they occupied from 1878 until his death in 1896. It continued to be made after Morris & Company established textile production at Merton Abbey in 1881, and it was produced in three colorways. Morris himself referred to this type of fabric as "woven wool tapestry," though it is not technically a tapestry weave but a doublecloth. The effect of this heavy wool fabric when used as a wall covering, as it was at Kelmscott House, is a fine example of Morris' interpretation of the decorative arts of that era.


Quote:
"Wandle" c. 1884. This printed design was achieved by a combination of indigo discharge and block printing. This multistep process began with the dying of the entire cloth with blue indigo dye. Then the areas that were not to remain blue were bleached (the blue was "discharged"), and the remaining colors were applied by the block printing method. The discharge process could produce both white areas and several shades of blue, depending on the strength of the bleaching agent applied to the fabric.

The design was inspired by historic textiles, especially fifteenth-century velvets that often featured a strong diagonal or meandering branch from which various flowers emanated. The title of the design refers to the river on which the Merton Abbey textile mill was situated—that river being absolutely crucial as a source of power and clean water for textile processing.


Quote:
Printed cotton, 19/20th century. As one of the forerunners of modern design, Morris took much of his inspiration from the arts and crafts of the past. His disgust with the inferiority of many Victorian industrially made textiles, which he found lacking in both quality and appropriateness of design, led him to study the aesthetics and techniques of earlier historic examples–from tapestries to embroideries. This knowledge enabled him to take inspiration from the past while still creating for contemporary needs. Thus, a two-dimensional design such as "Kennet" could be—and was—successfully used for wallpaper, woven silks, and printed fabrics. The effect in each medium, however, was altered by choices in color combinations (bold or subtle), materials (shiny or matte), and textures (flat or pile). While the undulating flower stalks look back to Italian fifteenth- and sixteenth-century velvet designs, they also presage Art Nouveau.


metmuseum.org

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03-10-2007
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One more William Morris.

Quote:
"Pink and Rose" wallpaper design, ca. 1890. Henry James described William Morris as "the poet and paper-maker" in 1881. Indeed, despite his many designs for stained glass, textiles, tapestries, furniture, and books, it is for his wallpapers that Morris is best known today. Reinventing the decorative vocabulary of his time, Morris believed that "any decoration is futile … when it does not remind you of something beyond itself." He turned to nature for inspiration, seeking to "turn a room into a bower, a refuge." The English countryside, with its hedgerows and native field and garden flowers, remained his touchstone throughout the period of over thirty years during which he designed wallpaper. Beginning in 1862 with the firm Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co., and later, on his own with Morris & Co., Morris designed forty-one wallpapers and five ceiling papers. "Pink and Rose," from about 1890, is typical of his late style, which is characterized by naturalism and a clearly articulated repeating pattern. Morris believed that beauty, imagination, and order were the essential components of a successful design; all three elements are evident in this example of his wallpaper. His papers not only were an immense commercial success during his lifetime, but they also played a significant role in raising the status of English wallpaper to a position of international preeminence in the last quarter of the nineteenth century.


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03-10-2007
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Quote:
Printed velveteen, 1890s. Designed by C. F. A. Voysey (British, 1857–1941) for Liberty and Co.; Manufactured by Turnbull & Stockdal, English. Voysey supplemented his small architectural practice by designing all kinds of domestic decorative items: furniture, metalware, wallpaper, carpets, and textiles. His patterns are distinctive, with stylized plants and birds, in a range of muted subtle colors.


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06-10-2007
  37
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concrete blond at designersblock
'
as part of designersblock 2007 concrete blond exhibited a new range of 'walled paper' patterns
ornate wallpaper patterns are embossed onto concrete surfaces, transforming the traditionally brutal aesthetic of the material.'







designboom.com/weblog


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14-10-2007
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Quote:
"Harvest Time" by Rockwell Kent (American, 1882 - 1971).


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18-10-2007
  39
girl who fell to earth
 
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^^i like that one...
what sort of material/media is it?

wallpaper? fabric?
I'm trying to imagine where i would like to see that sort of pattern..
i think it would look funny on curtains, or wallpaper etc..

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17-12-2007
  40
chat~
 
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^it's quite soft, chrissy
i think it would go anywhere too
for me, it would be the bed.. either the curtains in that room or
And you could also just stretch a smaller piece on to canvas, for a little 'chaos' in a person's home rather than allover pattern

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17-12-2007
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some wallpaper by Damien Hirst for the Prada Soho flagship shop here
http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...ml#post3875584




from metropolismag

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17-12-2007
  42
girl who fell to earth
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gius View Post
^it's quite soft, chrissy
i think it would go anywhere too
for me, it would be the bed.. either the curtains in that room or
And you could also just stretch a smaller piece on to canvas, for a little 'chaos' in a person's home rather than allover pattern
i think you're on to something here..
smaller doses would definitely look best with this pattern..
stretching it over canvas the way oiltrash suggested in the interior decor thread is an interesting idea..

i think this would look great on some pillows as well..

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18-12-2007
  43
scenester
 
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i really love those thibaut wallpapers.

pictured here is:
superwide Birdcage by Timorous Beasties
McGegan Rose by Timorous Beasties
Malachite from the Fornasetti Collection of Cole and Son
Tema e Varizione from Cole and Son.

also check of Wook Kim, soonsalon.com (Rachel de Joode's papers).

www.timorousbeasties.com, www.cole-and-son.com
Attached Images
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File Type: jpg Meg Rose S Wilson full page.jpg (693.3 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg malachite.jpg (141.8 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg tema.jpg (68.3 KB, 6 views)

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18-12-2007
  44
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yes, chrissy he's a great wealth of ideas
actually i made a mistake i wanted to say stretch the fabric over a stretcher bar or frame. like in painting, you stretch canvas over these wooden bars... you can also stretch it over a board like mat board... It's just so the edges are clean when you're finished tacking it down

shinkoyo sister I love the one with the red sofa! It's a very well-decorated room. The wall doesn't take away from any of the other objects... gorgeous carpets and floor too
The one with the teacup is also cute mysterious.. *swoon* Thanks for posting!

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18-12-2007
  45
girl who fell to earth
 
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^^that would definitely work too gius!!
i like your idea because then the fabric would also have a little "give" if that makes sense..
and for some reason i like that :p

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