How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Front Row / Careers, Education & the Business of Fashion
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
27-01-2007
  16
rising star
 
gemi_12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hamburg
Gender: homme
Posts: 153
you shouls also probally have a good idea how to use CAD

  Reply With Quote
 
28-01-2007
  17
rising star
 
piep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Europe
Gender: femme
Posts: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by jun3machina
and getting internships.....if you pay $40,000 a year, they better hook you up with some form of empoyment to pay off all your student loans
i agree about interships, always great if you get a place at a good design house, there is no better way for starting into business.

as for student loans, thanks god, or thank our education policy, the best art and design universities are free.

__________________
The better you look, the more you see. Bret Easton Ellis, Glamorama.
  Reply With Quote
28-01-2007
  18
scenester
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 92
you know who highers fashion illustrators??

fashion schools

and those people who do the fashion forecast books or trendbooks like "here & there"

  Reply With Quote
19-04-2008
  19
windowshopping
 
Amerzilian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: BR/USA
Gender: femme
Posts: 14
Fashion Sketch Artist
(Yeah, many questions, lol!) Where can I find a job for fashion sketch artist? Do you know any web site where they are looking for them? Any location?

  Reply With Quote
21-04-2008
  20
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago
Gender: homme
Posts: 4
yeah a fashion illustrator job would be nice, I too am interested.

  Reply With Quote
23-04-2008
  21
V.I.P.
 
gius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 10,161
I think you guys can approach fashion illustration as a career/job the same way as approaching any illustration job

Here are some helpful links !

http://penelopeillustration.com/artt...rtedindex.html
http://www.n8w.com/wp/552
http://www.kerismith.com/illustrator.htm

There are some more awesome sites in Keri Smith's website
I'll be trying this out myself We can do it together !

__________________

  Reply With Quote
23-04-2008
  22
scenester
 
HitchcockStarlet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasticGirl View Post
Most designers cant even draw, they instruct the illustrator so that it looks very stylised and professional... I think theres loads of work for this. But otherwise most designers use templates.
Its not that hard.
Sorry, but I wouldn't bank on it. Many fashion graduates land design jobs based on their illustrations and fashion drawings.

If you did work for a fashion designer/company as an illustrator it would most likely be for fashion drawing (realistic almost technical) than fashion illustrations, which are much more expressive. If the latter is what you're interested in then 9 times out of 10 you'd have to be a freelancer.

Richard Gray is my fashion illustration tutor; he's probably one of the most successful contemporary fashion illustrators out there and still he teaches, which could indicate how infrequent work can be. He also writes for a 10(?) magazine.

I'd say it's very important to have good knowledge and connections within the fashion industry. Not just so you can land important illustration jobs, but because it's possible you'll have to either suppliment your income other ways, or simply because it's so competitive you have to be ahead of the game. I think that's why a lot of fashion illustrators were either fashion design students or started out through more traditional illustration/publishing in order to gain the experience.

  Reply With Quote
23-04-2008
  23
V.I.P.
 
gius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 10,161
^ Hi there , do you have any example of what the realistic fashion drawing looks like?

I saw Mr Gray's website.. They seem to be more for advertisements, aren't they? Because they're very well thought out ..planned.. rather than sketches to simply illustrate a fashion designer's design

__________________

  Reply With Quote
23-04-2008
  24
scenester
 
HitchcockStarlet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 90
Aaahh, I just typed a really long reply and just lost it all.
Anyway, basically what I mean by 'more technical' is something that accurately shows the garment, which is what you'd probably originally think of a 'fashion illustration'. Something that's needed throughout the design process to work against, that's on a body template. The problem with finding work in that area is that most designers themselves would draw the designs to the best of their ability, so you'd end up working on making them as technical as possible (proportion, stitching, etc) or even doing the flat drawings, which I'd imagine would be quite dull.
Whereas the other type of illustration like Richard Gray's would be used by magazines/adverts/books.

picture source: fashioncampus.it
Attached Images
File Type: gif fashion drawing sketch.gif (114.3 KB, 7 views)


Last edited by gius; 23-04-2008 at 08:56 PM. Reason: added credits
  Reply With Quote
23-04-2008
  25
V.I.P.
 
gius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 10,161
^This illustration is the realistic stuff? from Gray's website? Thanks for the response !

__________________

  Reply With Quote
23-04-2008
  26
scenester
 
HitchcockStarlet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 90
No it's not from Gray's website, just google images lol. He doesn't do that type of illustration because he's not a designer (basically).

  Reply With Quote
17-05-2008
  27
V.I.P.
 
gius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 10,161
Interview with Richard Gray - fashion illustration as a career
From the fundamentals of fashion design
by Richard Sorger & Jenny Udale


Please describe your job.
I am commissioned to create fashion illustrations according to the client's creative brief. The client can vary, from editorial - magazines and books - or could be a couture, pret-a-porter or high-street designer. I am expected to create a rough/line illustration initially, to showcase my ideas and in response to what I have been asked to do. If everyone involved is happy with this, I will then complete the finished artwork, all within a set time and deadline.

Who are your clients and/or who have you worked for?
The designers/clients I have worked for include: Alexander Mcqueen, Givenchy, Agent Provocateur, Vivienne Westwood, Miguel Adrover, Julien MacDonald, Kylie Minogue and William Baker, Boudicca, Oasis, Printemps.
Editorially, I have worked for Vogue Pelle, for Anna Piaggi's D.P. pages for Vogue Italia, V magazine, Madame Figaro, Flaunt, The Observer magazine, Vogue Gioiello, Los Angeles Times magazine, Sleek, The Independent on Saturday magazine, Mixte, Io Donna, Jalouse (USA), Entertainment Weekly, amongst many others.

What was your career path to your current job for?

I studied my degree in Fashion Design at Middlesex University, UK. During this period, I was entered for an illustration competition in Italy celebrating the great fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez. I didn't win, but I came fourth, and was invited to go to Milan to meet Anna Piaggi of Vogue Italia. From this meeting I was asked to create illustrations for her D.P. pages in Vogue Italia, and also for Vanity magazine. On graduating, these first commissions made it much easier to get other people to see my portfolio, and I pursued my interest in fashion illustration as a career from then on.

What do you do on an average day?
Each day can vary so much from the next, depending on the turnaround of deadlines and the amount of time between them. I could be researching ideas, creating initial concept sketches, or creating final artwork.

What are your normal working hours?
My average working day is probably between 12 and 15 hours, due to the turnaround of work for deadlines. It can, however, be much less than that, and occasionally be much more, and it isn't unknown to work right through the night if necessary to get work completed to deadline.
The flipside of this is that you can potentially also get several days off in a row if you are between commissions. Unless you have determinedly structured your life to be this way, the demands of the job means that it is unlikely to ever be 9 to 5, Monday to Friday.

What are the essential qualities needed for your job?
Creativity, the ability to understand a client's creative brief and what they are trying to achieve from your work, and the limitations or expectations of work created towards specific markets. Discipline to make sure that work is done to deadline, even if it means late nights.
The ability to sometimes think outside the brief, and to make sure that your personality still comes through in your work - the reason why you have been approached in the first place.

How creative a job do you have?
Very creative indeed. It's the whole reason a client will come to you.

What kind of team do you work with?
I do not have any team at all, there is nothing to delegate. Any ideas have to be drawn by me, and painting is done by myself. The nearest it comes to teamwork is obviously when the client gets in touch and they will be in contact with my agent, and I will then be given the creative brief by the art director of the client.

What is the best bit about your job?
The best part of my job is the unpredictability of the working year. The surprise and delight when designers or magazines you admire ask you to work with them, and the variation in commissions from one to the next. I think it helps that I have not restricted my career to one single style, so I have a lot of variety in what I am asked to do.

And the worst?
It sometimes feels like there are not enough hours in the day, but apart from that there is nothing to complain about.

Any advice you would give to someone wanting to get a job in your area of fashion?
I think illustration is a career that can be very fulfilling, but like all freelance careers there are no guarantees. Not all people will like what you do, as any art and illustration is such a subject form, so don't be put off if you find your work is not to everyone's tastes, but always listen to constructive criticism and know when to ignore it. Most of all, as important as it is to be creative it is i important to be reliable. The client wants the work done with as little fuss as possible. Everyone is busy, multi-tasking, with a million problems to solve everyday. If you make their life that little bit easier by completing your work for them to deadline, completely answering their creative brief, they are more likely to come back to you again.

__________________

  Reply With Quote
22-05-2008
  28
V.I.P.
 
gius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 10,161
Pricing & Ethics when selling illustrations
bump *

I suggest checking The Graphic Artists' Guild Handbook on Pricing and Ethical Guidelines for fashion illustration

Key points when determining fees
  • type of usage and how long the illustration will be in usage
  • market (ie. corporate, advertising or editorial)
  • size
  • prestige of account
  • volume of work to be produced
  • illustrator's experience and desirability
  • job complexity
  • deadlines (for example, if it is a rush job.. job that needs to be done in a day, etc.)
Not quite sure what prestige of account means^

---------------------------------------------------

Trade practices
  1. What the art will be used for must be stated clearly in the contract, purchase order or letter of agreement with the price and terms of sale.
  2. Artwork cannot be altered in any way unless permission granted by artist. Would otherwise be a violation of ethical practice
  3. Original work is returned to the artist unless said otherwise
  4. First reproduction rights are usually sold by artist, unless said otherwise
  5. Additional use of artwork will cost in additional fees from 20-100% of original fee
  6. If a client wants to buy all reproduction rights or the original work, a typical charge is 100% of the assignment fee or higher
    Artist however retains the copyright
  7. If clients wants all reproduction rights AND original work, price is 200% that of the original, and the artist still retains the copyright.
  8. Artists can charge higher for rush work, often by additional 20-150%
  9. If the illustrator completes the project well under the client's requirements but the illustration is not used, the client must still be paid
    But if the job is cancelled early (after the job has already been started), there will be a "cancellation fee" or "kill fee" depending on how much work has already been done. ie. research time, sketches, expenses, compensation for lost opportunities that artist may have been offered that he/she had to refuse
    • prior to finish-in-progress: 50%
    • finished art-in-progress: 70%
    • after completion of finished art: 100%
    Also clients who put commissions on hold or without approval for more than 30 days should secure a deposit upfront
  10. Artists doing work on speculation will assume all risks and should evaluate them carefully when offered these type of assignments
One other tidbit:
The Graphic Artists Guild is against work-for-hire contracts where the authorship and all rights of the artwork are also given
In this case the independent artist won't receive any employee benefits and also will lose the right to claim authorship or profits that would arise from future use of the work
In other words, the work is not theirs anymore and is owned by the client


These are all just guidelines by the way
but it's important to have all agreements about prices, project requirements, etc. down in writing and signed/agreed beforehand

__________________

  Reply With Quote
22-05-2008
  29
V.I.P.
 
gius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 10,161
Pricing & Ethics when selling illustrations pt. 2
Some examples of prices from the book...
(more in t he book)


Direct mail brochures
  • Print run over 100,000 or large circulation
    Covers -(BW)$1,500-5,000 | (Colour)$1800-5000
    Spot/quarter page -
    (BW)$500-1500 | (Colour)$500-2500
  • Print run 10,000 - 100,000 or medium circulation
    Covers -(BW)$850-4,000 | (Colour)$1,000-4000

Instructional Booklets
  • Print run over 100,000 or large circulation
    Cover -(BW)$2,000-2500 | (Colour)$2,000-3500
    Figure -
    (BW)$800 | (Colour)$1400
    Spot/quarter page -
    (BW)$500-750 | (Colour)$500-1,000
Trade Catalogs
  • Print run over 100,000 or large circulation
    Cover -(BW)$2,000-4,000 | (Colour)$2,000-5,000
    Figure -
    (BW) $800 | (Colour)$1,400
    Spot/quarter page -
    (BW) $500-1,000 |(Colour)$500-$1,500

Other
  • Hang tag/labels -(BW)$750-800 | (Colour)$1,000-2,000
  • Store fixtures (per piece) -(BW)$150 | (Colour)$250-$375

  • T-shirt apparel
    • Flat fee -(BW)$500-1,000 | (Colour)$500-1,500
    • Advance -(BW)$250 | (Colour)$500-750
    • Royalty (BW)2%-10% | (Colour) 5%-15%


  • Showroom/presentation boards
    • Figure -(BW) $150-300 | (Colour)$250-500
    • Flat -(BW) $30-50 | (Colour)$50-100


  • Line sheets/price list
    • Figure -(BW)$50 | (Colour)$100-$125

__________________

  Reply With Quote
22-05-2008
  30
rising star
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by HitchcockStarlet View Post

Richard Gray is my fashion illustration tutor; he's probably one of the most successful contemporary fashion illustrators out there and still he teaches, which could indicate how infrequent work can be. He also writes for a 10(?) magazine.
He was my tutor too!! He's really great isn't he? I thought my portfolio was quite good, but boy was I wrong! He spent so much time with my class, giving advice on our portfolios to have them ready for when we graduated (last year) and I ended up starting my portfolio all over again (about 6 fashion collections)... and he completely helped me find my niche when it came to illustrating my designs and ideas.. honestly, my portfolio would be so rubbish if it wasn't for him.

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
career, fashion, illustration
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:33 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. 2014 All rights reserved.