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19-05-2006
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thanks

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19-05-2006
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guys, i'm moving this into the mega portfolios thread, it's in the careers and education forum for your convenience!

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Last edited by Pastry; 19-05-2006 at 04:21 PM.
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27-05-2006
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Some nice examples from the Fashion Fringe finalists at Vogue.co.uk

http://www.vogue.co.uk/Gallery/Fashion_Fringe/

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22-06-2006
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Im trying to figure out what to put into my portfolio for fashion design, and im not sure what to put in it or what colleges are looking for in a portfolio. what do i need to include in my portfolio???

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22-06-2006
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Sometimes the colleges explain what they want in the portfolio, i.e. (Career, sportswear, ) most of the time they specify... in my case I've had that experience...

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03-07-2006
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How many collections should be in a portfolio? What if you're applying for Textiles (which is what I'm leaning towards)?

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03-07-2006
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^hey! cool! educo me too. i'm taking Textiles this fall. i've already been accepted
you should probably ask your school or read their website to find out how many. at mine, it was up to 10 pieces (of any kind of art, with emphasis on 2D). other schools i've applied for in the past asked for 15-20.

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05-07-2006
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Oh, right.. did you include collections featuring your textile designs, or did you just display separate textile designs individually?

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05-07-2006
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I displayed them separately because I was only allowed to show up to 10 pieces. If I did a collection, that might mean each piece of that collection will count as one piece.
I actually didn't have any textiles in my portfolio, but several of my paintings/drawings were designed in a way that they could be used as prints for textiles. I also showed them a few things not in my portfolio, like a piece I made in a saori weaving class I took outside of high school. It was so they would know I had been interested in textiles for a while. I would have showed them some clothing I made too, but I didn't have anything exciting

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10-07-2006
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God i'm going to be applying to csm this coming school year...they ask for 25-50...i have like 10.... and only about 5 months... any tips?
i need fine art stuff also... what about design sketches? what makes them finished? i use prismacolours and stuff..but they what makes them complete? any ideas? with photography also.... i'm stressed!!!! thanks for your help.

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14-07-2006
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Hi, just found this little piece and came to think of this thread... It's from the jury of the its#five competition, and this particulary applies to the portfolios designers sent in to be judged for this competition, meaning they already have a finished collection. But I thought it was kind of well said, and maybe it could be helpful for anyone setting up a portfolio to apply for a school or a job.

--//It is very sad though when portfolios don't include all the requested material or are difficult to read and understand. The jury can do nothing but reject them: if they can't see photos of the collection or of previous work, if the material inside is not easy to read or all messed up, it becomes very difficult for them to understand the project. Sometimes they see incredible illustrations by people who do not put one single photo in their portfolio to prove how they work, their technical ability and if they are able to translate in reality what they draw.
It looks as though too often the young creatives forget that if they want to show what they are capable of, they have to do it in a clear and complete way. When we ask you for all of those things in the enrollment regulations, it's not because we want to make things difficult for you or discourage you, it's the exact contrary!! It's because we know that if you don't organise your portfolio in a clear and complete way, the jurors will just be forced to reject your projects, since they are not able to fully understand it. Too often we open portfolios and see glimpses of what might be an amazing project, and then they are rejected simply because there are no photos at all...when you express your creativity you have to express it in a clear and complete way if you want other people to judge it!//--

itsweb.org

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14-07-2006
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Tips
  1. A portfolio is like an advertisement of your work. It best represents or gives testimony to your talents, skills and problem solving abilities. Here are some tips that should help you prepare for and organize a successful portfolio.
  2. Make sure the portfolio includes your name, mailing address, phone number, and high school.
  3. All pieces should reflect your capacity for original and creative thinking.
  4. All pieces should demonstrate your knowledge and age-level mastery of media and techniques.
  5. It is extremely important to show variety and flexibility in your approaches to art.
  6. You should only select pieces you feel proud to show. Do not include mediocre work as filler. Never include work of lesser quality just because the idea was good.
  7. Limit the number of pieces to between ten and twenty. Remember quality is more important than quantity.
  8. Do not include pieces that need explanations.
  9. Avoid choosing pieces that are messy, dog-eared, wrinkled, torn or show poor craftsmanship in any way.
  10. Include sketchbooks. They demonstrate one's creative capacity as well as drawing skills.
  11. Photostats and blueprints are suitable reproductions, however, tracings and photocopies are not.
  12. Include pieces that show you have a grasp on color theory, proportion, linear and atmospheric perspective.
  13. Include pieces that show accurate rendering of transparency, reflection and texture: plastic and glass objects, metal tins, tools, mirrors, dried flowers, seashells, animals, feathers, etc.
  14. Do not include more than two cartoon or comic book images and be sure they are completely original.
  15. Include character studies of real people, young and old.
  16. Include studies showing the figure in action, other than comic book figures.
  17. Include pieces with objects or subjects having complex interior contours and negative spaces: bird cage, rocking chair with rungs, houseplant, room interior, items in a catch-all drawer, laced shoes, etc.
  18. Include pieces that presented a challenge to you. Here are some examples:
    • An overhead view of an open container holding an object of personal importance.
    • An image that conveys a "caged in" feeling.
    • An album cover depicting someone's life.
    • Two unrelated objects juxtaposed in a way that suggests a possible relationship.
    • Two circles, one inside the other. Fill the larger circle with designs that represent classical music and the smaller circle with designs that represent jazz or rock music.
    • A distorted landscape that expresses a human emotion such as anger, sorrow, jealousy or happiness.
    • An object with interesting reflections in it, i.e. chrome hub cap, metallic box, glass bottle.
    • A book cover.
    • An action figure positioned or distorted to fit the shape of a letterform.
    • A bicycle positioned at an angle showing foreshortening.
  19. Protect pencil, graphite, charcoal, chalk, conte-crayon, and pastel drawings by applying a spray fixative.
  20. Your artwork needs to be presentation worthy as well as protected. Matt or mount each piece and then wrap it in clear acetate. Do this in a consistent manner - if you mount one piece on white board, do so for the rest. Protected pieces can be stored and carried in a large, poster-board envelope. An easier alternative is to buy a zippered case that holds black pages in plastic sleeves. Flat artwork can be placed in each sleeve easily. The black page provides a nice frame. These and similar portfolio cases are available in many sizes at your local art or office supply store.
  21. If you have created original films, textiles, sculpture, jewelry, photographs or digital art pieces, consider them for your portfolio. You will stand out from the majority of students; not all schools offer such processes.
  22. Do not include framed pieces or three-dimensional pieces. Take photos or slides of them instead. Digital shots aren't usually accepted because of the possibility of manipulation.
    • If you can not take good photos or slides, check with a local camera shop for an expert.
    • Label each photo or slide with your name, title, year of creation, medium and dimensions.
    • Place photos or slides in a plastic viewing page purchased from a photo supply store.
  23. Sequence pieces in an organized or "story board" fashion.
    • Choose a dramatic piece as the first in the sequence; you want to get the attention of the judges or school admission staff.
    • Include a few undeniably traditional pieces that show your competence in drawing.
    • Group similar pieces together, however, do not show too many pieces of the same problems.
    • Partway through, present a different style or approach, for example, switch from traditional to abstract.
    • Save the best piece for last; you want to leave them with a good impression.
  24. Discuss the completed portfolio with your art teacher or professional artist you know and respect. He/she will look at it objectively, possibly seeing strengths and weaknesses you did not. Bring your portfolio to college fairs and ask prospective schools for their suggestions.
  25. Remember, you can always add to or change the portfolio depending on the expectations of the school you are interested in attending (or employer, if you are planning to work in the field directly after graduation).
from http://www.ncusd203.org/north/depts/art/portfolo.htm

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17-07-2006
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I've noticed that many of you have mentioned using croquis. I always thought drawings done, using a croquis, were sort of like cheating and were not supposed to go into a portfolio. I dont know where I got this idea but because I've thought this, I've been spending too much time perfecting my figure drawing and not focusing on my designs and the actual clothing. So my question is, Is it ok to use a croquis in a drawing for a portfolio?

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Last edited by J'aime_la_mode; 17-07-2006 at 07:28 PM.
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30-07-2006
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hmm, I know that better is to show original drawings in portfolio, but many of my drawings are 50/70 cm, so I think at school they will accept photocopies?


Last edited by mintyyy; 30-07-2006 at 07:31 AM.
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30-07-2006
  210
trendsetter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uberQuirkiness
God i'm going to be applying to csm this coming school year...they ask for 25-50...i have like 10.... and only about 5 months... any tips?
i need fine art stuff also... what about design sketches? what makes them finished? i use prismacolours and stuff..but they what makes them complete? any ideas? with photography also.... i'm stressed!!!! thanks for your help.
they dont ask you for anything you just show what you think needs to be shown oh i think they asked for life drawing though. most of my portfolio was fine art stuff from my course you're sketches dont have to be finished infact i think they prefer them when they're rough to see how you work.

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