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08-03-2011
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i mostly do editorial because it s what pays the best here.

also rates are very different here, for example photographer gets paid 1000 when makeup artist gets paid 200 at most
and i don t have have a daily rate, but and overall rate that just under the photographer.

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08-03-2011
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Where are you located ... that editorial pays so much? Wow!!

Here, in the US and in L.A. in particular it's either free or at most, $100 to $150 for the whole gig ... and pretty much the same for photogs too. It's considered a way to market yourself ... because you get credited and you can add it to your portfolio and use it to impress prospective commercial clients.

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08-03-2011
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i understand how it works in the states, when i lived in canada it was the same
because there are catalogue jobs, commercials, film ... different ways to style and be a stylist

here basically there are almost no celebs to style, they prefer to keep their money in their pockets and pick their own clothes. which isn t always a good idea.
catalogues? i can t think of any. and if there are it s people coming from europe to use cheap models and photographers.
movies? either actors wear their own clothes or they hire a stylist who doesn t get paid much
but again not as paid as editorial

so basically editorial is the top of the ''foodchain'' but again a lot of magazine use the same stylists every month and it s rare to find ones that use freelance and different one each issue. which makes it even hard to book a job because if a magazine starts with a stylist they re basically there to stay.

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Last edited by FASHIONLOVA; 08-03-2011 at 03:48 PM.
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09-03-2011
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i have a question concerning portfolios
what paper is better for printing?? glossy picture paper? or kind of magazine paper?
thank you

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Last edited by FASHIONLOVA; 09-03-2011 at 03:51 PM.
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09-03-2011
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Glossy photo paper is the usual choice.

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10-03-2011
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Thank you so much BetteT

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12-03-2011
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Aspiring stylists in LA might want to check this place out:

http://www.chiclittledevilstylehouse...chic_home.html

I called them this past week and they were really nice and helpful; I expected to get shut down since I'm not a pro yet lol. You can borrow from them if you're doing something for press, but if not they charge 10%-20% of the retail value for an item.

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12-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BetteT View Post
The same as for contacting agencies. Photographers usually lead the team ... they will need to see how good the photographer is before they would even consider it. If he's good enough, they will expect him to have a strong team on board, already ... stylist, makeup/hair artist, good models. And he owns the copyright to the images ( not the stylist or anyone else), so only he can contract with the magazine.

Now ... if you are hired by a magazine (actually paid) to be the art director of the shoot, the photographer would answer to you ... and you could style it if you wanted, but most likely you'd bring in another stylist. You would be extremely busy with the entire process and every detail. You would not have time to style too.

What does an art director actually DO though?? Ive never been on a shoot w/ an actual art director, although I've directed some shoots myself and sometimes the photographer does it. All we ever do as far as directing is okaying the make up, hair, etc., so I can't imagine what else someone would do if that was their main role...

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13-03-2011
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What does an art director do? Here's the thread about that.

I have worked with an Art Director a few times.

Once I did it for Corbis ... I didn't even know that they commissioned shoots. This was for Corbis in Europe and they sent this woman out from France and she hired the photographer, who, in turn, hired me (but I submitted my invoice to her to give to Corbis). She went with the photographer to choose locations, cast the models and determined the look of the shoot. Then I was brought in to provide the wardrobe to her specifications. I presented what I pulled and she made the final choices. She stood right behind the photographer and approved everything as he shot. She was the boss, she was the creative decsion maker who was hired by Corbis to put together and supervise the whole thing from start to finish.

And I did it for a company who made golf shoes and they sent an employee who directed the shoot ... who was in all intent, the art director. In this case, they already knew what shoes they were shooting and brought them to the shoot. All I had to do is put together golf outfits to coordinate with their shoes. But the process was pretty much the same ... she was in charge and told everyone what and where she wanted to shoot, and approved the wardrobe.

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Last edited by BetteT; 13-03-2011 at 07:13 PM.
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13-03-2011
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^Thanks for the info! The photographer must've been annoyed, lol.

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14-03-2011
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No, actually it didn't seem to bother either one of them. That's the way it usually is on commercial gigs ... someone from the company is always in charge of the shoot, whther they call that person an "art director" or not. At best, the photographer gets to colaborate and they use his ideas.

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Last edited by BetteT; 14-03-2011 at 10:13 AM.
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15-03-2011
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I need some advice, I've got a new portfolio, ive organised my work and I want to now approach some agencies, I don't know what to expect as this is the first time I've taken my work to agencies! Any advice or tips on going on about this the right way and getting what I want? I've been working in the industry for several year, I've built a large network of contacts in the industry, so I feel I'm ready to make the next move.

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15-03-2011
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If you are approaching agencies who rep cretive people (photogs, stylists, makeup artitists, etc.) ... here's what I've been told:

Your portfolio should be well developed, have some serious tears in it from known magazines and you should have a good client base before the better agencies will want to rep you.

In addition, they will probably want you to bring your clients with you ... which means they can chage your clients and collect commission from you and from them, when you work for them again. It's a two way street ... you bring them clients and they bring you clients. So ... be aware of that ... you'll probably want to negotiate exclusions for some of your best clients ... since you found them in the first place. If the agency wants you and think you have the potential to work a lot, they might be willing to exclude some or all of your existing clients.

Some stylists opt not to get representation for this reason ... they are already working a lot and don't want to loose commission money for existing clients.

It's kind of a "catch 22" as I understand it. They want you to have lots of clients before they are interested in repping you ... but you need them to get you clients. Difficult, at best. So ... it has to be carefully evaluated to determine if you can find a middle ground where both you and the agency will profit above what you are making now.

Of course ... they not only should kick up the volume of work offered to you, they also do do all the billing and follow on unpaid invoices, and help you negotiate a beter rate than what you might get on your own ... things the a lot of artistic people are not very good in doing.

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Last edited by BetteT; 15-03-2011 at 12:10 PM.
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15-03-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BetteT View Post
If you are approaching agencies who rep cretive people (photogs, stylists, makeup artitists, etc.) ... here's what I've been told:

Your portfolio should be well developed, have some serious tears in it from known magazines and you should have a good client base before the better agencies will want to rep you.

In addition, they will probably want you to bring your clients with you ... which means they can chage your clients and collect commission from you and from them, when you work for them again. It's a two way street ... you bring them clients and they bring you clients. So ... be aware of that ... you'll probably want to negotiate exclusions for some of your best clients ... since you found them in the first place. If the agency wants you and think you have the potential to work a lot, they might be willing to exclude some or all of your existing clients.

Some stylists opt not to get representation for this reason ... they are already working a lot and don't want to loose commission money for existing clients.

It's kind of a "catch 22" as I understand it. They want you to have lots of clients before they are interested in repping you ... but you need them to get you clients. Difficult, at best. So ... it has to be carefully evaluated to determine if you can find a middle ground where both you and the agency will profit above what you are making now.

Of course ... they not only should kick up the volume of work offered to you, they also do do all the billing and follow on unpaid invoices, and help you negotiate a beter rate than what you might get on your own ... things the a lot of artistic people are not very good in doing.

Many thanks BetteT for the pointers,while i have some work, i think im going to need more tear sheets and clients, i find this almost frustrating as it stands magazines and brands wont give you any work if you are not represented by an agent, and an agent wont take you on without tear sheets and clients.

Getting tear sheets when you are starting out is really difficult, ive approached alot of magazines for possible commissions, and the responses have been less than positive, which proves that having representation goes a long way, if you can get it.

Whats the best possible way to approach a magazine, through an email to the Fashion Director? Should l send comp cards? My Book maybe?

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17-03-2011
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See the page before ... we were just discussing how to approach magazines to do an editorial. The short answer is ... you don't, the photographer does it. #38

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