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28-11-2005
  241
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 4
i second the above!

I've applied to a few training programs, but no luck so far. :-\

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life is short ~ buy the shoes
 
 
19-12-2005
  242
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so.like.a.rose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 49
i just wanted to tell thanks to lena for her story!it's amazing!

-------
thank you BetteT for all the tips!they are going to help me a lot!

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"Beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on simplicity."-Plato

Last edited by so.like.a.rose; 19-12-2005 at 02:21 AM. Reason: i just saw what BetteT wrote!
 
19-12-2005
  243
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so.like.a.rose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 49
hi,well since some of you(in the earlier posts)said that zara is ready to help to some wannabe stylists i was wondering if someone has contact email so i could ask for some assisting stylist job?
cos soon they are opening store where i live and i would like to be fast

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"Beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on simplicity."-Plato
 
07-01-2006
  244
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LISOC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sydney
Gender: femme
Posts: 43
i've been reading through this thread and please forgive me for my confusion but do stylists control the entire visual aspect of a shoot (i.e. not just the actual clothing) or is it the photographer who comes up with the concept? i'd love to be a stylist in the case that they create the visual layouts as seen in fashion magazines for example. i enjoy dressing people up and creating outfits (and putting modesty aside, i get a lot of good feedback in regards to my style), so i was wondering if this is the right direction for me or if i've created something in my head to fit what i want to do. TIA! :-)

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07-01-2006
  245
etre soi-meme
 
Lena's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: europe
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,965
*the fashion story & title mood usually comes from the stylist who together with the fashion director chooses which photographer will be assigned for the job
*the image concept can be a collaboration of both the stylist and the photographer.. in big magazines, the production team put together the preparartion for the editorial.. photographers can also help out with the casting and the choice of model(s) as well as suggesting locations for the shooting, ordering lights etc
* the final layout is mainly the art director (and occasionally the photographer -if available) who take care of this
the stylist has also a saying on the final proof of the editorial.

it all depends in which magazine one works for/with
-when working with real 'established' photographers, stylists are less 'powerful'
-when working with 'new' photographers, stylists are more responsible for the entire editorial..

 
07-01-2006
  246
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LISOC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sydney
Gender: femme
Posts: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lena
*the fashion story & title mood usually comes from the stylist who together with the fashion director chooses which photographer will be assigned for the job
*the image concept can be a collaboration of both the stylist and the photographer.. in big magazines, the production team put together the preparartion for the editorial.. photographers can also help out with the casting and the choice of model(s) as well as suggesting locations for the shooting, ordering lights etc
* the final layout is mainly the art director (and occasionally the photographer -if available) who take care of this
the stylist has also a saying on the final proof of the editorial.

it all depends in which magazine one works for/with
-when working with real 'established' photographers, stylists are less 'powerful'
-when working with 'new' photographers, stylists are more responsible for the entire editorial..
you bloody rock! thankyou so much for clearing that all up for me! cheers!

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08-01-2006
  247
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 7
hi everyone , this is my first post and my first time visiting this site.. i came across it while looking up how to become a stylist..
I am actually intersted in becoming a fashion editor for a magazine , it has been my dream , but i never knew how to go about acheiving it..im finishing school in the summer and want to take journalism at University in the fall... does any one know of anyone who is or is becoming a fashion editor , and what path they took? any tips would help!!
thanks!!
cheers , shopgirl193...

 
25-01-2006
  248
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pixiewytch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tampa, Fl
Gender: femme
Posts: 119
aspiring stylist looking for insight
Hi everybody, I am fairly new to the forums and hoping to get some pointers into the right direction before I delve into "styling" my husband's photo shoots. To give you a bit of background he is an aspiring fashion photographer and I am currently a stay at home mom to our four year old son. He is still working a professional day job but hopes to one day quit his day job for photography. He does mostly TFP right now but with his portfolio is currently trying to get paid work. We have our first paid starter model portfolio next month.

Anyway, I have been long fashion obsessed, love to shop, constantly read fashion magazines, keep up with trends, high end designers, etc. I have contemplated a career in fashion for awhile but am not in the situation to go to school, nor do I want to drop 50K on an education that may or may not benefit me.

I know from reading previous posts that enjoying fashion in general is a small part of being a stylist and all of this is really new to me. That is why I am asking for some guidance. It just started to make sense for me to start styling my husband's shoots since we are both "aspiring" and building portfolios. I have some idea of where to start, instructing models on how hair and makeup should be done, coming up with locations, set ideas, and helping them pick out their wardrobe, accessories, etc. I love doing those things so it seems like a piece of cake.

However, I have no idea about the business side of things or what I should really be doing as a first step. I highly respect all of you paid stylists out there and I don't want to step on any toes by calling myself a "stylist" with no experience. So how do I start doing this respectfully and what advice do you have before my first styling shoot?

Please note that we don't live in a highly metropolitan area and there are no stylists to assist or apprentice under that I can locate. I'm also not looking to claw my way to the top of the industry or anything like that. Family is my priority. I just wanted to find a way to bring something I enjoy and can possibly cultivate into what my husband does as well.

 
25-01-2006
  249
V.I.P.
 
BetteT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Gender: femme
Posts: 20,361
First of all ... I suggest that you hook up with a few good up and coming makeup artists wheo can also do hair and who want to test for prints and who could work with you on your model's portfolio shoots. You can't do it all and do it well.

As the stylist ... you have to consider what your goal is. If you are helping style a model's portfolio shoot (she's paying you/your husband), you must understand what she will need in her portfolio which will be a variety of styles. So if she has an agent, have her ask what she needs. If she doesn't, you need to find out what the market is that she's looking to go into. I see you are in Tampa ... probably a very commercial market which means "pretty girl next door" looks ... not fashion. But if she's heading to Miami ... well that can be heavier in fashion looks but she'll certianly need a great swimsuit shot as well. Remember, the main goal of a model's test is to make her shine ... not what she is wearing, so simple is usually better, as long as it flatters her ... showing assets and diguising flaws.

Next, you and your husband, as photographer and stylist need to build beyond model's portfolios so you'll be planning more ambitious shoots. You should take all the known factors such as what the model(s) looks like and the location of the shoot into account and brainstorm for a concept or theme (sometimes called a story). Both photographers and stylists need stories in their books ... to prove that they can produce a series of images that is cohesive and makes visual sense. Use the editorials in magazines as good examples.

You can build a story around a color, on a certain garment like what do do with skirts or an accessory, or almost anything. Remember that your resources will be limited ... consider where will you be getting wardrobe and accessories ... so try to work with what you can get. Thrift stores are a treasure trove for beginning stylists, if you have a good eye (and you better, if you aspire to be a stylist) and the patience and creativity to put it all together and a way that works.

Keep it simple, to start ... don't over do it, the mistake of most new stylists. Less is almost always more ... unless your story is about excess. A bold and graphic shape on a garment ... without any accessories other than killer shoes can be a strong statement ... and if you can find 3 or 4 similarily bold shapes ... that can be your story right there. Avoid small accessories ... they always seem to clutter up the image without making a statement (except that i will look amateur). An accessory needs to be placed there on purpose, because it ads to the image. So have your models take off all jewelry first (including piercings and wedding rings) and you add back on what works. No sweet necklaces and matching earrings, no little chains and no hearts and flowers. Here's the sort of thing that does work: One big bold chunky necklace ... but no earrings, works well. Or a big bunch of bangles on one arm makes an impact with a bright, sexy pair of shoes in either the same or a complimentary color is another way to make accessories work. And unless the model is an experienced pro ... handbags can be disasterous ... most new models don't know how to work them. And if it's for her portfolio, get rid of any bags ... they draw they eye away from her. Hats ... have to be carefull with these too ... they can add drama, but if you want the model's face to show you have to either go without a brim ... or make sure that the photographer can light her from beneath the brim, without making her look ghoulish.

Make sure that every garment is pressed or steamed (usually by you) ... no wrinkles unless they are supposed to be there. Watch our for straps and bra showing through ... don't let gaps and pulls happen especially on buttoned shirts. On set, site across your husband's shoulders, to look at everything before he takes the picture ... that's your job ... to make sure the wardrobe is perfect.

Just some thoughts about styling ... sort of rambling ... hope it's some stuff to think about.

If you'd like ... go to my site and contact me ... I can give you more info that might help you as you start your styling business. http://www.musecube.com/BetteT/

 
26-01-2006
  250
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pixiewytch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tampa, Fl
Gender: femme
Posts: 119
Thank you so much for your advice and for not being condescending. I do appreciate that. I looked at your portfolio and enjoyed the editorials the most. My husband and I both love that type of work.

Anyway, we are very fortunate right now to have a makeup artist we are exchanging services with to build one another's portfolio as well. She does some hair but that is one area we don't have a lot of help with.

As for the starter portfolio, this is a 17 year old girl we have photographed before who is not with an agency and really doesn't know what her goal is. I have already asked so I could decide which direction to take the portfolio in but she doesn't seem to have a clue. She just wants something to start with. and her mother is willing to pay for it. I figured we will just stick to something really simple, like you said, maybe something "catalog" oriented. As you said, there really is no fashion scene here at this time. We have already discussed possibly moving later on down the road to an area where there is more fashion/editorial work.

I also appreciate what you said about over accessorizing. I can see that being a pitfall of mine too. I love accessories, handbags, hats, chunky jewelry, etc. I will now be mindful about not overdoing it and using one focal piece instead of several all at once.

I also didn't think about pressing clothing in advance. Okay, here is a question for you, particularly for a portfolio where there are several wardrobe changes...and she is providing the clothing...should I meet with her in advance before the photo shoot to select clothing and make sure it is satisfactory or is it okay to wait until the day of the shoot and have her bring it all with her? I'm just wondering what others do in this situation who don't have the luxury of shops and designer giving you clothes to borrow.

 
30-01-2006
  251
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BetteT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Gender: femme
Posts: 20,361
Model portfolio shoots pay way below normal rates (stylists can make over $500 a day for commercial shoots and up, once they are experienced) ... both for the photographer and the stylist, so I wouldn't do fittings on another day. Just have her bring lots of stuff ... and tell her to have it ALL clean, pressed and on hangars. Don't you get caught up in doing all the work for a minimal amount of money. Remember, for a portfolio shoot you are not going for a story or theme ... each look needs to be very different than the others ... both in the wardrobe, hair, and background. It should look like she had several photo shoots ... a variety. For a portfolio shoot, you really cannot borrow clothes from boutiques and designers anyway, so you must pretty much rely on her wardrobe and whatever you own ...hopefully you can pull a few looks together.

You could, if you want to, buy some things and return them later ... but that can get old in a hurry ... they will stop you if you do that too much.

Tell her to bring her sexy shoes, high heeled boots for jeans, cute flats and sandals, her dark, but not distressed jeans ...especially if she's a bit hippy, lots of skirts and dresses, shorts, fun bright tops. For variety, consider doing a summery look with a dress or skirt, a jeans look or maybe a swimsuit if she's got a perfect body and it's always a nice touch to do a winter look ... maybe a jacket with a fur collar over a cable knit sweater ... always a good commercial look that seems to look good on everyone. And for portfolio shoots, remember, minimal jewlery, if any at all. It's all about showing off her figure and face ... not the accessories. You will learn, over time what works well and what doesn't.

Steaming clothes is almost half of what a stylist does ... get used to the labor ...it's pretty physical work. We also lug and carry wardrobe, accessories, shoes, steamers, racks and a myriad of misc. stuff related to styling and prepping the clothes around to shoots ... my stuff has to weigh about 100 pounds or more, fully loaded with wardrobe. And jewelry and shoes are HEAVY! I always bring way too much ...just in case. The plan always seems to change after fittings.

Oh ... a couple other points:

Most models say they are smaller than they really are (I don't know why?) ... so I usually get clothes in one size larger ... particularily pants and tight skirts (its usually the hips that are big) and then I clamp and pin them in back or the side away from the camera, if they end up being a bit too large. You'll have to learn how to do that too.

Models can usually wear shoes up to 1 size larger or smaller than their size, if needed ... it may hurt a bit it they are too small, but they don't have to wear them for long. Looking beautiful while experiencing discomfort is something a good model can do very well.


Last edited by BetteT; 30-01-2006 at 11:36 PM.
 
01-02-2006
  252
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7
Hey everyone. Fashion hs always been a passion of mine and whenever I dress my mom or offer advice to someone on what to wear they always compliment me and always ask again. I also really love Business (Finance & Management) and that's currently what I am doing in college. I would really like to try something on the side dealing with fashion (and way in the back of my mind is the idea to completely do that ) but I read through a lot of these posts and was wondering straight up....can you make a decent living off of it? I know a lot said they do freelance, but can you still support yourself? One thing I thought of is since I love Business, maybe manage a fashion company, etc.

 
01-02-2006
  253
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BetteT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Gender: femme
Posts: 20,361
Some can and do make a living from Fashion Styling, some are paid thousands a day if they are working with the right celebs but most never make it. It's highly competetive and it takes years to build a steady clientele, unless you get lucky. And most of the paying work is not very exciting ... you have to meet your clients' needs, not be especially creative.

What most people lack is not talent, nor the "eye" for styling, nor the desire to succeed ... they lack the business skills and this is why they fail. Being a freelance stylist is the same as opening any small business. You must have funding to get it up and running, you must have a busines plan with specifics of what you need to do to get the clentele, and you must market yourself heavily.

So being a business major (entrepreneurial studies in particular) probably prepares you better than any fashion school, giving you the real skills that anyone needs to suceed in a new business. If you love business and are itching to make the money and time investment in something entrepreneurial, love fashion, have a great eye, are physically strong and in good health and pay attention to detail ... then Styling might be just the thing. But making a living won't happen overnight ... it takes years in most cases, unless you are "connected" in the industry.

 
04-02-2006
  254
rising star
 
Fashtastic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Gender: femme
Posts: 104
I would love to become a Fashion Stylist or Celebrity Stylist. I am a huge fan of celebrity stylist Rachael Zoe, I think she is dressing Nicole Richie, Lindsay Lohan, Mischa Barton etc. so nicely! And I have read she makes $6000 per day and per client! Sounds like quite the life.

I love styling people and often have people coming to me asking me for tips etc. Mostly the people that know about my fashion website come and ask me for tips, which I think is very fun.

I would really love to be a fashion/celebrity stylist but I do not know at all how to get there, what type of education do you have? Is there some special college or specific courses I can take to become a fashion stylist? From what I have heard it all has to do with who you know.

 
05-02-2006
  255
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zrzava's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Europe
Gender: femme
Posts: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fashtastic
I love styling people and often have people coming to me asking me for tips etc. Mostly the people that know about my fashion website come and ask me for tips, which I think is very fun.
Your website looks great! Are you also a web designer or did you start with a posh template?

From the looks of your advice there you are already prepared to work as a fashion stylist.

 
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