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05-06-2008
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rockitgirl, kathleen fasanel for me is one that stood out as a pattern maker in the forums... i'm sure there are more, since many study/finished studying design

mm.. i'm not a pro, but i was elected recently to create the patterns for this place i work at.. they are very simple sculptural pieces , and we'll also start on furnishings later for the fall. what i learned in clothing pattern-making was very useful since i am also making 'body' forms
but i find it's a lot of maths, using rulers, and common sense.. but definitely needs dedication and a ton of patience!

i don't quite understand this separation you sound like you're feeling of pattern makers (in your post)
when i am designing, it's the patterns i'm working with.. and also the drawings/designs.. back and forth... i can't see them being done separately... There would definitely be some kind of dynamic lost if it was separate...

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06-06-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BetteT View Post
I just merged this thread with some related material ... to get it all into one thread.

And reading the previous posts, maybe someone can answer my question, please?

Is a pattern maker different from a pattern cutter? I would think so ... wouldn't a pattern maker create the pattern based on a design given to them by the designer? And a cutter ... just cut? Or are they just different names for the same job?

No there isn't a difference. We in the US called them Patternmakers. UK refers them as Patterncutters.

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06-06-2008
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Gius:

I don't know who the separation comment was directed at...I hope not me...? If you were referring to the comment about pattern makers vs designers you do not see the difference because you work with the patterns...well of course! But in big design houses the designer does not work with the patterns.

Pattern Makers do not make $150K on average. I know for a fact that Aritzia has several pattern makers (when I was in there I saw about 5 and who knows who was not at their desk) and I can garauntee you they do not make that much money. Those high salaries would be for the lead pattern maker at a huge brand like Calvin Klein just like the designers get paid more but many designers only earn $30K if they are working at small places.

Patternmakers are in demand, yes, because pattern making is not taught in depth and so there are less people with the skills. It is actually a bit sad I think that things are going by way of computerized pattern making. Now that there are computer programs your skills do not need to be as fine tuned and so a lot of smaller companies are producing less refined patterns for their products. But I know many companies still require you to have excellent paper pattern making skills first so that you truly understand what the CAD program is doing and can make fine adjustments based on your experience vs accepting what the program spits out. (at Aritzia for example I was told their pattern makers have on average 18 years experience and ALL spent at least 10 years on paper...most of the women were in their late 30's and were of an asian decent)

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07-06-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockitgirl View Post
Sorry BetteT, I searched and did see this thread but I started a new one because this thread is a discussion about fashion designers vs pattern makers. I'm not looking for a discussion about that or about what a pattern maker is, I was just trying to see if there are any active members on the forum who are pattern makers. It's okay that you merged it I guess but I fear now anyone who is a pattern maker and has already seen this thread will not bother reading it again and see that I am looking for them.
Actually, we find that people will jump in again if they see that the thread about their speciality/occupation has been bumped and will answer your question, if they are here. Then if you wish to network with them, you may PM them. Combining it all in one place is the tFS way ... so that people interested in the topic can find all the info and all the pros all in one spot. Otherwise we end up with more than 10 times the threads and the information gets spread out all over the place. Hope you understand.

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23-06-2008
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No, patternmakers do not make more than 6 figures. Now, if they are also managing production for clients they might earn a commission for that, too. But, I don't know any full-time patternmakers earning this much.

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23-06-2008
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I'm currently doing pattern cutting. But my course involves designing as well so when I graduate I will hopefully have the best of both as I will be a designer AND pattern cutter

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16-03-2009
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studying more pattern making
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockitgirl View Post
Patternmakers are in demand, yes, because pattern making is not taught in depth and so there are less people with the skills.
would love to know how to learn pattern making 'in depth'
if you have learned to do all the basics,
the basic bodices (and certain specifications, like one for a person with swayback and so on)
basic kinds of sleeves
basic trousers
basic skirts

what else is there to learn?
would all patterns be based on all of these basic patterns...

i can only thinking of draping, where you create a pattern out of draping fabric on a form.

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17-03-2009
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^i guess when talking about in depth, i guess it involves couture cutting and bespoke cutting. in bespoke, the best cutters can of course cut a suit and fit a person fantastically. in couture im guessing a good cutter can come up with new and innovative ways to cut and create shapes. i do also want to understand how is hundred pounds akira trousers different from a primark trouser in terms of cut. i know akira trousers will most likely fit a lot better than primark but how do i cut the trousers to get a better fit?

speaking of the debate on fashion designer vs pattern maker/cutter. personally i think a designer should understand and be able to play both roles. but of course if the person is a designer, i would think he/she would be better at designing than pattern making.
anyways, the two designers, balenciaga and vionnet i admire greatly are fantastic cutters as well designers. my personal belief is, in order to make great designs, one understands good pattern cutting. as well as tailoring of course...but less im guessing. let's not forget the tailors and seamstresses!


Last edited by MUXU; 17-03-2009 at 01:29 PM.
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17-03-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockitgirl View Post
Hey how many of us are there on here? Pattern making is a really important part of fashion design but in my experience the vast majority of pattern makers are older than the average age on this website. Apparently it's not thought of as glamourous or something but I LOVE IT.

Am I the only one?
I think that the fashion world only has two glamorous "sides" to it:

1. Parties of course xD
2. What people sitting in a show get to see.

I think fashion is not glamorous at all. Going to sleep at 5am or not sleeping at all is not glamorous xD, getting down and dirty with the fabrics, patterns, yarn, paint, machines and all that stuff doesn't tend to be very glamorous xD, and then you have the backstage of the shows, which is always a mess, so I think fashion is really not a glamorous thing haha

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17-03-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MUXU View Post
^i guess when talking about in depth, i guess it involves couture cutting and bespoke cutting. in bespoke, the best cutters can of course cut a suit and fit a person fantastically. in couture im guessing a good cutter can come up with new and innovative ways to cut and create shapes. i do also want to understand how is hundred pounds akira trousers different from a primark trouser in terms of cut. i know akira trousers will most likely fit a lot better than primark but how do i cut the trousers to get a better fit?

speaking of the debate on fashion designer vs pattern maker/cutter. personally i think a designer should understand and be able to play both roles. but of course if the person is a designer, i would think he/she would be better at designing than pattern making.
anyways, the two designers, balenciaga and vionnet i admire greatly are fantastic cutters as well designers. my personal belief is, in order to make great designs, one understands good pattern cutting. as well as tailoring of course...but less im guessing. let's not forget the tailors and seamstresses!
I think that in order to be a great fashion designer you have to be able to make a pattern, cut it and then sew it. And you need all that knowledge because how do you expect to know when something in the pattern is wrong if you don't know anything about patterns, that's why I think a fashion designer HAS to know a lot about everything. And also a great pattern maker/seamstress/seamster/tailor/etc., is always going to be needed in order to make great clothes.

I would think that pattern makers and cutters are more needed than a designer because imagine that 1000 students graduate per year in a country, then how many people do you need to make the clothes?

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17-03-2009
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not sure if anyone answered my question.. muxu are you saying basically that to study pattern cutting more in depth means to be able to create patterns that fit better? what i have been taught, if you do all the measurements correctly you will always get the perfect fit (or at least one with minor adjustments). i have never had a problem with the patterns i've been taught, they always fit (i've just been fitting mannequins though.)

i just mean if you look at many of the designers' collections, most of it is based on the "basic patterns". you just alter them, play around with them, the techniques are all there in the basics...
so maybe to do it in depth it just means to do some experimenting of your own i'm asking because i've finished a basic drafting course but there is advanced drafting, but i was told we learn all the basics so we should be able to draft anything after doing the basic course. i don't know what else there would be in the 'advanced' section --i heard actually it is just a continuation and maybe it is just a practice session really... The only thing i haven't figured out yet, is kimono sleeve and cape,
from the basic patterns i know now. Still thinking though...

going a bit off-topic but one thing i have learned from one day being around pattern makers and another day being around seamstresses, it's that a pattern maker will know how to create effects with patterns, fabrics.. but a seamstress/tailor is super mandatory and will know for example trims and bindings that can enhance a design or invisible details that will hold that shape or pleat of a garment.. Really if i hadn't learnt how to sew, i wouldn't know what to do with all the patterns i've been taught this year and there are new design ideas that come to me only because i am learning how to sew.

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03-04-2009
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Actually the fit is the thing that make patternmakers go crazy. Every designer-design has a different vision of how clothes need to fit their clients body. Most of the patterns will fit a mannequin because they have a proportioned body. us humans not really, it gets trickier when working with different ethnicities or body types.

A patternmaker must know how to work a pattern so it gives the body a certain shape, to enhance it or hide the flaws. Another thing to consider is what type of clothing you are makign and the fabrics to use. sportswear needs fit experts since clothing can affect in a big way the athletes performance. And so other types of clothing, always have in mind how the finished garment is going to be wore, that pretty much sets what fabric to use and how adjustments should be done, what gius said its tue, once you know all the basic patterns youll be able to modify them to create and infinite number of patterns.

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03-04-2009
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Oh i remember now that i have lots of patterns scanned on my computer. Are these what you were looking for gius?

img224.jpg
img225.jpg

kimono.JPG

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03-04-2009
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i see, that makes sense. ^^ so it's not exactly about it fitting a person perfectly, rather fitting the person in a way that suits the wearer.. according to the design.
so regarding the cape..
it might be this pattern creates an A-line shape
but you would have to know where to edit the pattern, to create a straighter silhouette
i think i will start coming across these 'problems' more and more as i begin actually making fashion designs.



thanks so much for the new patterns!
the cape is so simple XD i will copy these to my books
i already started my advanced drafting lessons and my instructor told me what i was looking for was not kimono but dolman sleeve and that became the first lesson that week
i see the kimono is done quite differently... we will learn that this coming Monday

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20-08-2009
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here is some example pricing i found on nancysgonegreen.com
article's named Tailoring 101 , written by "Naomi"

Quote:
Here is a list of the most common jacket alterations, and the prices you might expect to pay. The prices I’ve listed are what you are likely to see in an urban area, and may be a little bit less elsewhere…
  • Remove shoulder pads (usually without a tailor)
  • Take in the shoulder seams — $30
  • Take in the length of the sleeves — $20
  • Extend the length of the sleeves — $20 plus cost of materials
  • Take in the width of the sleeves — $25
  • Take in the at the bust — $35
  • Take in at the waist — $35
  • Take in the length of the jacket — $35
  • Extend the length of the jacket — $35 plus cost of materials
  • Add buttons — $5 plus cost of buttons
  • Replace zipper — $20 – $25
**For leather jackets, an additional cost is often added because special machinery is required

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Last edited by gius; 20-08-2009 at 02:34 PM.
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