How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Front Row / Careers, Education & the Business of Fashion
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
16-12-2005
  91
backstage pass
 
finalfashion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 521
Right now I'm doing samples for my line, using fabrics found downtown at jobbers, etc. The pieces are appropriate for fairly common fabrics - jersey, lightweight woven cotton, stretch twill. The problem is that these fabrics don't come with any significant yardage because of their source. This is sort of helpful to me in the sample stage when I decide to change my mind about the fabric or the colour or whatever. I was thinking that when I started to produce my line I would purchase some appropriate, similar fabrics from a jobbers in whatever quantities were available, and present my samples with the swatches when presenting my line, because I don't want to mass produce until I get orders.

I guess I should reproduce the samples in the fabrics available when I can finally make the bulk fabric purchase... but I am working a little back-asswards here, and the price will be a lack of fabric continuity between my initial samples and the final products. My only saving grace is that the fabrics are simple solids and are usually in stock at any number of suppliers. The orders I am capable of delivering will be small so I don't think that ordering large minimums from a wholesaler is an option... I want more flexibility, especially because I don't have a lot of space for fabric inventory.

Also, the samples I am working on now are going to be shown at my school fashion show and featured in photo shoots, so I am making them a little more "artier" and funked up than what I plan to do in production. So I guess a second set of production samples is the way to go.

__________________
final fashion
  Reply With Quote
 
30-12-2005
  92
front row
 
fashionbutterfly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: saudi arabia
Gender: femme
Posts: 303
Quote:
Originally Posted by starz1 View Post
Do you guys really think that with just this type of book, you can start your own label, and actually have it become sucessfull? I was looking at: fashionforprofit.com that one seems to be good

And there's awhole bunch of other ones out there too. I would rather do what Jennifer Lopez does, like just have me do all the designs, they pay everyone else to do everything (like source the fabrics, find the cheapest but highest quality manufactors, market the clothing to high end department stores, promote the brand through publications). Like I just wanna design them, and have a whole team do the rest. Bascially what Gwen does with Zaldy. Anyone know how I can do this?

And I've already tried my hand at both fashion design college, and fashion marketing college, and I just dont have the engergy to sit there 5 days a week for 2 years (just for 1 course also). So I have to look into alternate ways. J lo has a great seam, and so does Gwen. How can I get teams like them?

(PS- I am not working for that site or plugging it)
i think you can starz1..and to prove it...u can like team up with some freinds or ppl who share ur interest n raise money by selling stuff and maybe finding a loan or gettin to know somebody who would help ufinically n u do the designin work..like sponser u..


Last edited by BetteT; 28-01-2010 at 01:27 PM.
  Reply With Quote
30-12-2005
  93
etre soi-meme
 
Lena's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: europe
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,965
true what smartarsh said..
apart from talent and great ideas.. one unfortunately needs a BIG amount of cash, endless working hours and some real experienced people to assist a yound designer, in order to get an indie business rolling..

  Reply With Quote
05-01-2006
  94
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Gender: homme
Posts: 17
do NOT waste your money on fashion for profit. Especially if you are looking to start a guys line, the book is filled with stuff that any one who has been in the fashion business for two years can tell you and it is not worth the 55 bucks..

If you are interested in starting a clothing line Jlo should not be your idol, as it was stated before she probably does absolutly nothing but approve drawings. And it is nowhere near that easy to get into department stores without connections.

Start slow, go get a job at a boutique and started learning what hot brands are doing especially the smaller ones. And then find a mentor and go from there.

  Reply With Quote
05-01-2006
  95
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Manhattan - New York City
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,028
exactly, Lena. Talents are not enough. Great ideas are not enough. Sadly it takes capital to launch this type of business or any business for that matter. And with that, clout is extremely important, especially in a very competitive environment like starting your own label.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lena
true what smartarsh said..
apart from talent and great ideas.. one unfortunately needs a BIG amount of cash, endless working hours and some real experienced people to assist a yound designer, in order to get an indie business rolling..

__________________
Head Over Heels
NatashaYarovenko.EditaV.ToniGarrn.KarmenPedaru.AliStephens.Sigrid.Selezne va.ChiaraBaschetti.
  Reply With Quote
07-01-2006
  96
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 21
Designers: How did you start?
I'm curious to see how all the aspiring designers on here started off.
Like, how did you learn the techniques you know today. What got you intrested in Fashion? You know, that kind of thing.

I'm just really nosey, lol

  Reply With Quote
11-01-2006
  97
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 17
yes i am also interested in this
please enlighten us!

  Reply With Quote
11-01-2006
  98
rising star
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Vancouver
Gender: femme
Posts: 179
Barbie clothes at age 4, by age 10 needles through the feet didn't hurt anymore...for most of us I bet it was a lifelong thing.

  Reply With Quote
02-02-2006
  99
backstage pass
 
ShesElectric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: New York
Gender: femme
Posts: 933
What I'd like to know is your second question...

How do you find people to produce your clothing - big thing for me as I can't sew... just learning. I'd manage making samples and have shown buyers for amazing boutiques designs and they'd be interested as soon as I can get them produced.... so help in that area... who to produce them??

  Reply With Quote
02-02-2006
  100
tfs star
 
ilovepositano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: U.S. and A (in the words of Borat)
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,942
sewing factories- esp. good ones-- are v. depressing in the US.

if you do knits, find a place in California. one place that is good and does small quantities is NORTHRIDGE MILLS. (do you know how long it took me to find that factory my first year? you should be paying me millions of dollars! )-- anyway they do stuff for Velvet and Jcrew & Patagonia shortruns.

if you do dresses, find a place in NY. goto GDIC and they will hook you up with factories that work with startups in NY.

good luck!

  Reply With Quote
02-02-2006
  101
scenester
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: las cruces nm usa
Gender: femme
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovepositano
sewing factories- esp. good ones-- are v. depressing in the US
You know, that's just not true. Maybe it's not a place that you like but that doesn't mean the people who work there think it's depressing. I've worked in sewing factories since before you learned to tie your shoes and I love it. Not only do I not think it's "depressing", I think it's exciting and challenging. It's a helluva lot harder than the designer's job! I make twice as much as a designer (I'm a pattern maker) so how can that be depressing? It's a real challenge to do top notch work on a budget and at the drop of a hat. All I can say is it's a good thing that my peers disagree with you too. If it really was as "depressing" as you say it is -according to your personal likes and dislikes rather than facts- then you'd really be stuck trying to find somebody to put your things together, wouldn't you?

  Reply With Quote
02-02-2006
  102
tfs star
 
ilovepositano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: U.S. and A (in the words of Borat)
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,942
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathleen fasanel
You know, that's just not true. Maybe it's not a place that you like but that doesn't mean the people who work there think it's depressing. I've worked in sewing factories since before you learned to tie your shoes and I love it. Not only do I not think it's "depressing", I think it's exciting and challenging. It's a helluva lot harder than the designer's job! I make twice as much as a designer (I'm a pattern maker) so how can that be depressing? It's a real challenge to do top notch work on a budget and at the drop of a hat. All I can say is it's a good thing that my peers disagree with you too. If it really was as "depressing" as you say it is -according to your personal likes and dislikes rather than facts- then you'd really be stuck trying to find somebody to put your things together, wouldn't you?
lol, i'm not saying people at factories are depressed. you sound pretty defensive.

yeah it is me who is saying they are depressing, so of course that means they are depressing to me because i am the consumer of factory work and i'm depressed w/ the relatively higher expense and lower skills i have encountered as compared to the sourcing that i can obtain overseas ?! (before you attack me for saying that sourcing is better overseas, recognize that i'm speaking from my own experience-- which is all that i can do in a free dialogue.)


Last edited by ilovepositano; 02-02-2006 at 08:59 PM.
  Reply With Quote
02-02-2006
  103
scenester
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: las cruces nm usa
Gender: femme
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovepositano
hmmm....yeah of course if i see they are depressing that means they are depressing to me as the consumer of factory work?!
If you mean that you personally find it would be depressing for you, yeah, I can see that. It takes a certain kind of personality profile to work in a factory. That's what makes the world go round. Personally, I would find having to do a designer's job to be depressing -to say nothing of boring- but that doesn't mean my opinions are anything other than a personal preference because there are legions of kids who'd love nothing better! Does this mean they're shallow and stupid? Hardly. It's just a different personality. It takes all kinds to make the whole machine work. You do your part, we do ours; we're each happy in our own space and neither of us will criticise the other. Cool?

  Reply With Quote
02-02-2006
  104
tfs star
 
ilovepositano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: U.S. and A (in the words of Borat)
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,942
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathleen fasanel
If you mean that you personally find it would be depressing for you, yeah, I can see that. It takes a certain kind of personality profile to work in a factory. That's what makes the world go round. Personally, I would find having to do a designer's job to be depressing -to say nothing of boring- but that doesn't mean my opinions are anything other than a personal preference because there are legions of kids who'd love nothing better! Does this mean they're shallow and stupid? Hardly. It's just a different personality. It takes all kinds to make the whole machine work. You do your part, we do ours; we're each happy in our own space and neither of us will criticise the other. Cool?
hmmm...no i didn't mean that i would be depressed as a worker in a factory. i mean it is depressing for designers and sourcing managers to try to source apparel through american factories. that is the subject of this thread, right? how does a designer find fabric and a factory to produce a first small line?

  Reply With Quote
02-02-2006
  105
scenester
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: las cruces nm usa
Gender: femme
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovepositano
i mean it is depressing for designers and sourcing managers to try to source apparel through american factories.
It's a challenge but it couldn't be any more depressing -from our end- working with those same designers and sourcing managers. It's hard working with people who don't really understand how the work is done and all it takes. You can't say anything because they're so busy "knowing it all" and you know they're going to fall flat on their face because of "X" thing but they never listen (you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink). In fact, that's why I got into what I do now. It was so depressing to watch designers fail over the stupidest reasons. That's why I wrote a book about it -the most common form of designer business failures and how to prevent them. I got tired of watching so many fail, such a waste of talent and money. Now that is depressing!

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
#1, label, or line, post, related, starting, threads
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 AM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.