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25-03-2012
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^Are they going to do a simplier (i.e non-collector) version of it? I'd love to get it but don't like Lanvin enough to pay 300€...

I just pre-ordered The Little Black Jacket: Chanel's Classic Revisited

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25-03-2012
  362
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^Well it's being published by Steidl so I wouldn't get your hopes up, I hope they do, because I'd like it too, but I'm really doubting it.

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26-03-2012
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The Little Black Jacket: Chanel's Classic Revisited by Karl Lagerfeld & Carine Roitfeld





This book is Karl Lagerfeld and Carine Roitfeld's reinterpretation of Chanel's iconic little black jacket. Lagerfeld has redesigned the jacket, transforming it into a modern, adaptable garment to be worn by both sexes of all ages. The Little Black Jacket contains Lagerfeld's photographs of celebrities wearing the jacket with individual flair - sometimes classic, sometimes irreverent, but always Chanel - and each styled by Carine Roitfeld. A range of accomplished actors, musicians, designers, models, writers and directors gets the little black jacket treatment, including Claudia Schiffer, Uma Thurman, Kanye West, Tilda Swinton, Baptiste Giabiconi, Yoko Ono and Sarah Jessica Parker. This book shows the astounding versatility of Chanel's vision in Lagerfeld's hands, and ensures the little black jacket's future as a timeless classic.


Publisher: Steidl ,232 Pages.

chanel.com

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26-03-2012
  364
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Stars in Dior




Publisher: Rizzoli ,240 pages


Cover:
Charlize Theron, photographed by Alexi Lubomirski, in a black satin dress, Christian Dior Ready-to-wear collection by John Galliano Autumn–Winter 2008.
© Alexi Lubomirski.

Marlene Dietrich, Sophia Loren, Olivia de Havilland, Grace Kelly, Ava Gardner, Ingrid Bergman, Elizabeth
Taylor… All famous names who starred in the greatest films, shot by the finest directors and all dressed in some of the most amazing couture creations by the House of Dior.

They were faithful clients of Dior Haute Couture, Perfumes and Make-Up and close friends of Christian Dior, and in some cases, his successors too. So it was quite natural that they should ask to be dressed in Dior for their appearances on screen and at the celebrated movie ceremonies held around the world (the Academy Awards, the César Awards and the Golden Globes).

Today’s great names are Charlize Theron, Natalie Portman, Penélope Cruz, Kirsten Dunst, Monica Bellucci… Times have changed but the passion for Dior stays the same.
The Dior filmography is impressive, featuring over 90 films. It started in 1942: Christian Dior was fascinated by film and became a costume designer even before his couture house was created in 1946.
This book devotes a special place to the J’adore advertisement starring Charlize Theron, in which cinema
magic brings back to life Marlene Dietrich, Grace Kelly and Marilyn Monroe, all of whom had their own links with the House of Dior.

Film stills, location shots, photographs and portraits of actresses: the 250 illustrations in the book take us deep into the most glamorous aspects of the film world.




vogue.uk

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30-03-2012
  365
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Applying for fashion journalism in London - bibliography suggestions?
Hi,

I want to apply for the MA course of Fashion journalism at either London College of Fashion or Kingston College. The thing is that I haven't studied the BA degree but since I have enough experience in the fashion industry and with creating writing specifically, I may use the option to skip the need of the BA.

But the thing is that - of course - I need to catch up with a lot of lecture. Could you please suggest me useful books about the fashion theory, fashion history and fashion journalism?

Thanks in advance!

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31-03-2012
  366
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*I've already pre-ordered this, I couldn't resist.

Schiaparelli and Prada : On Fashion (Metropolitan Museum of Art)
by Harold Koda & Andrew Bolton (in collaboration with this years MET exhibit)



Quote:
Although separated by time, Miuccia Prada and Elsa Schiaparelli - both Italian, both feminists - share striking affinities in terms of their design strategies and fashion manifestoes. Presented as an intimate "conversation", "Schiaparelli and Prada" aims to tease out formal and conceptual similarities between the two designers. Striking photographs and insightful texts will illustrate the parallels between the two, including their preferences for interesting textiles and prints, eccentric colour palettes, and a bold and playful approach to styling and accessories. Schiaparelli, in the 1920s through the 50s, and Prada, from the late 1980s to today, exploited the narrative possibilities of prints, sought out unconventional textiles, played with ideas of good and bad taste, and manipulated scale for surrealistic outcomes. Contemporary art plays a major role in the work of these inventive women - Schiaparelli in her famous collaborations with Dali and Cocteau, and Prada via her Fondazione Prada. Blending the historic with the contemporary, new technologies and unconventional modes of presentation will bring the masterworks of both designers together into a grand conversation between the most important women fashion designers to ever emerge from Italy.
*Amazon.co.uk

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31-03-2012
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^One thing I missed, was the release date, 31st of May 2012.

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31-03-2012
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^I was tempted to pre-order it to but I'd love to see what's inside because I have absolutely no idea of how it's going to be like.

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22-06-2012
  369
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Dolce & Gabbana's 'Campioni'
by Domenico Dolce



avaxhome.ws

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18-07-2012
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Grace: A Memoir by Grace Coddington, out 20th November 2012 at 304 pages.


*Amazon.co.uk

Quote:
It won't be out in time to take to the beach, but Grace Coddington's upcoming memoir is sure to be the hottest book among fashionable readers.

In case you'd forgotten, the Vogue editor, who we fell in love with from 2009's "The September Issue" and have been missing ever since, is working on a book about her life to be co-written with pal and Vanity Fair style editor-at-large Michael Roberts. Some details emerged last summer about the tome, which will cover everything from Grace's childhood in England to her time as a model in '60s London.

The book, reported the Observer, was sold to Random House for a cool (and rumored) $1.2 million. But those anticipating a juicy tell-all will be just a bit disappointed.

"I’m not telling secret stories," Grace tells the New York Post's Cindy Adams. "Not writing ugly bad things to get back at anyone. This book’s not gossipy. It’s more a record. I’ve kept a diary since I was a tiny kid trying to find my way, and going through all my written records reminds me of shoots and jogs my memory."

Fine by us -- it's the shoots, the sumptuous fashion spreads for which Coddington is famous, that we'll be looking out for. Earlier reports in Women's Wear Daily also mentioned the inclusion of colleague interviews -- meaning, perhaps, an Anna Wintour cameo?

We'll have to wait and see. According to Grace, the book debuts in November.
*Huffingtonpost.com

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18-07-2012
  371
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Kate: The Kate Moss Book
Edited by Jefferson Hack and Jess Hallett
Photographed by Patrick Demarchelier, Terry Richardson and Bruce Weber
Publication date: November 06, 2012
Publisher: Rizzoli
Price: $85 (USA)

Quote:
About This Book

A highly personal and complete retrospective of Kate Moss’s career, illustrating her evolution from girl to supermodel to photographic icon, created by Moss herself. Kate Moss began modeling as a teenager, when the first photographs of her shot by Corinne Day appeared in The Face. While her celebrity skyrocketed in the ’90s with her campaigns for Calvin Klein, Moss maintained an intense and private glamour and became known for her dressed-down personal style and resulting street cred. She has remained one of fashion’s most beloved and influential forces, whose legions of admirers range from magazine editors, art directors, and photographers to fans of the collections she designed for Topshop and Longchamp. Moss has been photographed by every top fashion photographer, and this volume spans the entirety of her unparalleled career, from model to fashion designer, and muse to icon, through images that Moss has personally selected for this book. It reveals her unique evolution from a shy and transformative young girl into an international supermodel, showing the strength of her collaborations with the world’s leading photographers, fashion designers, stylists, and artists.
- RIZZOLIUSA.COM

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25-08-2012
  372
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source | vogue.com

Quote:
Agents Provocateurs: A Look at Vogue's New Book The Editor's Eye
by Hamish Bowles

What makes a great fashion image? A new book, Vogue: The Editor’s Eye, celebrates the work of Vogue’s boundary-pushing fashion editors.

Throughout its 120-year history, Vogue has been creating arresting images intended to make the reader’s eye stop. These are images that evoke desire—for something as real as a dress or a lipstick, or as intangible as a whole new body language, attitude, or paradigm. Some are images of stately, introspective calm; others make the heart leap with an adrenaline charge of energy, reflecting a century of change in fashion, society, and culture.

But who are the thoughtful provocateurs who have collaborated with Vogue’s image-makers to capture the moments you see frozen on these pages? The Editor’s Eye is a tribute to eight of these remarkable women (there have also been a handful of remarkable men) who have guided, educated, and enabled photographers and illustrators to create the visuals that have propelled fashion forward. They reveal not only the evolving history of women’s self-presentation but also the extraordinary arc of their journey from the end of the nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first—the roiling ocean of emancipation, liberation, and empowerment, changes reflected in the lives of the women whose work is gathered here.

Vogue’s editors have long been instrumental in defining the faces of the era. During the tenure of the sweetly imperious Edna Woolman Chase, from 1914 until her retirement in 1952, it was the moneyed society women, generally of a certain age, who were the real leaders of fashion, and great models from Marion Morehouse to Lisa Fonssagrives were styled after their likenesses. Collaborating with Irving Penn in the late forties and fifties, Babs Simpson dressed her subject (reflecting her own impeccable personal style) and then sat down to her needlework as she quietly directed the sitting. Diana Vreeland, who came to Vogue in 1962, shook things up when she made young beauties like Baby Jane Holzer, Edie Sedgwick, and Marisa Berenson the faces of the moment, turned quirky performers like Barbra Streisand and Cher into style stars, and transformed the waifish Twiggy into an American celebrity as well as a British one.

Now the focus shifted to reflect the Youthquake era. Penelope Tree was “discovered” at Truman Capote’s 1966 Black and White Ball (written up in Vogue by Gloria Steinem) and was soon whisked to Richard Avedon’s studio, where Polly Allen Mellen emphasized her gangly limbs in a too-small pantsuit; together they created a defining image of idiosyncratic sixties beauty. A decade later, Jade Hobson turned Patti Hansen into the smiling embodiment of the golden goddess next door. Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele was front and center in creating the supreme moment of the supermodel in the late eighties and nineties, working with Patrick Demarchelier, Steven Meisel, and Peter Lindbergh on pictures that made Cindy, Naomi, Linda, Christy, et al., the most famous faces of their generation.

Vogue’s current pantheon of talent continues to recalibrate our eye. Grace Coddington, who helped make stars of models like Amber Valletta, Shalom Harlow, Karen Elson, and Stella Tennant, prides herself on dressing every girl the old-fashioned way, rather than delegating this task to assistants. Phyllis Posnick, the Penn whisperer at the turn of the twenty-first century, sparked a glorious refulgence of invention and imagination in the artist’s work. The cerebral Camilla Nickerson, working with the most experimental talents of her day, presided over Kate Moss’s transformation from waif to artist’s muse to bride. And Tonne Goodman’s faultless eye and coaxing charm have played a part in redefining the image of nearly every celebrity the magazine has deemed worthy of celebration in an era when fashion is made not by elegant, socially ascendant women of a certain age but by cultural icons, from Lady Gaga to First Lady Michelle Obama.

Today Vogue productions can resemble filmmaking in scale and ambition, but it wasn’t always thus. For the fall-winter 1950 haute-couture collections, Penn made a rare trip to Paris to work with the fashion editor Bettina Ballard. The chosen studio where he installed his dappled tarpaulin backdrop was “up five exceptionally long flights of stairs, with no telephone, no water.” Ballard booked the models, attended the collections, selected the clothes from her notes (it was forbidden to photograph or sketch), and negotiated with the directrices of the fashion houses for their release (these saleswomen, on commission, invariably prioritized their customers, so clothes were available only at lunchtime or at night, which is when Penn and Ballard were shooting). The production yielded some of the most iconic fashion images of the century. “My heart was involved with every picture,” wrote Ballard, recalling her mid-century portfolios.

The dramas and the headaches and the battles are all eclipsed by the thrill of that great collaborative moment when a perfect storm of editor, photographer, model, clothes, hairstylist and makeup artist, environment, and concept come together to create an image that captures the moment, and may—who knows?—even have a life after fashion.

Excerpted from Vogue: The Editor’s Eye, compilation copyright © 2012 Condé Nast. To be published by Abrams, October 2012.
source | vogue.com
  • A Lens on a Legend: In 1962, editor Babs Simpson dressed Marilyn Monroe in Christian Dior Haute Couture for Bert Stern’s famous last portraits of the actress. Photographed by Bert Stern, Vogue, 1962
  • Face in the Crowd: With a surrealistic flourish, William Klein photographed Marie-Lise Grès among a swarm of faceless onlookers in front of the Paris Opera, 1963. Klein was “very good-looking, easy to work with, but completely selfish,” editor Babs Simpson recalls. Photographed by William Klein, Vogue, 1963
  • Double Exposure: Editor Polly Allen Mellen worked with photographer Herb Ritts to capture Carré Otis (left) and Stephanie Seymour in all their tousled glory in 1989. Photographed by Herb Ritts, Vogue, 1989.
  • Work of Art: With photographer Horst P. Horst, Mellen juxtaposed Veruschka with George Segal’s Walking Man at Sidney Janis Gallery, 1966. “My motto was always: Be daring!” says Mellen. Photographed by Horst P. Horst, Vogue, 1966
  • Splendor in the Grass: Helmut Newton staged Lisa Taylor mid-seduction in 1975. Taylor was one of “the two women who most turned Helmut on,” editor Polly Allen Mellen recalls. “You had to turn Helmut on, or you wouldn’t get what you wanted.” Photographed by Helmut Newton, Vogue, 1975
  • Taken in Stride: Jade Hobson looked to Blade Runner and to Japan’s avant-garde designer Yohji Yamamoto for her 1983 shoot with Hans Feurer. Photographed by Hans Feurer, Vogue, 1983
  • Walk This Way: Photographer Steven Meisel and editor Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele showcased a six-pack of supermodels in 1994, all dressed in ultrashort sherbet-colored Chanel suits. Photographed by Steven Meisel, Vogue, 1994
  • Curiouser and Curiouser: In one of Vogue’s most ambitious shoots, photographer Annie Leibovitz and editor Grace Coddington reimagined Natalia Vodianova as Alice, with milliner Stephen Jones as the Mad Hatter, and designer Christian Lacroix as the March Hare, 2003. Says Leibovitz: Coddington is “the best fashion editor in the world.” Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, Vogue, 2003
  • On the Road: In 1992, Coddington and photographer Steven Meisel led Kristen McMenamy through the gardens at the Château de Champs. Photographed by Steven Meisel, Vogue, 1992
  • Desert Siren: At the Marrakech market in 1992, Grace Coddington and photographer Ellen von Unwerth styled Nadja Auermann as Marlene Dietrich in Morocco. Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth, Vogue, 1992




source | vogue.com

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25-08-2012
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...
  • Arch Attitude: For Vogue’s annual Shape Issue in April 2011, editor Tonne Goodman dressed the singer Rihanna in a cutout swimsuit to emphasize her spectacular curves, photographed by Annie Leibovitz.
    Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, Vogue, 2011
  • Transformer: In 2011, Tonne Goodman dressed Lady Gaga in a pink wig for the cover of the March issue, shot by Mario Testino. Photographed by Mario Testino, Vogue, 2011
  • Lady of Shalott: Rooney Mara swoons like a Pre-Raphaelite heroine, photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott. “The process of arriving at a very good fashion photograph,” says Goodman, “is, for me, complicated.”
    Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, Vogue, 2011
  • Court Dressing: Working with the photographer Irving Penn, editor Phyllis Posnick styled Cate Blanchett in a Balenciaga by Nicolas Ghesquière dress in 2007, inspired by a costume Blanchett wore in the movie Elizabeth.
    Photographed by Irving Penn, Vogue, 2007
  • Masquerade: In 2002, Penn and Posnick used a deflated football to illustrate the effects
 of overtreated skin.
    Photographed by Irving Penn, Vogue, 2002
  • Dreaming in Technicolor: Camilla Nickerson teamed up with photographer Steven Klein and model Amber Valletta (together with her son, Auden) to create this arresting image in 2011. Nickerson describes her work as “harnessing the clothes to what’s going on.” Photographed by Steven Klein, Vogue, 2011
  • Miss Mouse: Irving Penn collaborated with Phyllis Posnick to photograph Lisa Cant in a lace mask in 2005. Julien d’Ys sprayed her hair white, save for one stray wisp. “There are no accidents,” says Posnick. “There’s that curl—her own dark hair unsprayed.” Photographed by Irving Penn, Vogue, 2005




source | vogue.com

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25-08-2012
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Quote:
W: The First 40 Years
by Christopher Bagley [Editor] & Stefano Tonchi [Foreword]

One of the world’s leading fashion magazines, W will celebrate its 40th anniversary with this volume—a collection of the most influential and iconic features and photos culled from its first four decades. W is renowned for its groundbreaking, provocative, often controversial fashion stories by such photographers as Steven Klein, Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, Bruce Weber, Mario Sorrenti, Tim Walker, Juergen Teller, and Paolo Roversi, among many others, the best of which fill these pages. Divided into three sections—Who, Where, and Wow—this volume shows why W’s unique blend of unparalleled access, cultural smarts, and visual panache has always kept it at the forefront of not only the world of fashion, but also in art, design, style, beauty, celebrity, and society. Appearing in these pages are many of the world’s most talented, beautiful, and accomplished from a vast array of fields, including Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, Madonna, Damien Hirst, Alexander McQueen, Daphne Guinness, Beyoncé, Karl Lagerfeld, Kate Moss, the Beckhams, Tilda Swinton, and Jackie Kennedy. In addition to a foreword by the book’s editor, Stefano Tonchi, W: The First 40 Years also includes newly commissioned essays from writers Lynn Hirschberg, Marian McEvoy, and Vince Aletti. Longtime W contributor Christopher Bagley has edited the text and written revealing captions that draw upon the magazine’s most memorable interviews and reporting.

Publication Date: November 1, 2012
source | amazon.com

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15-11-2012
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Dior: 30, Avenue Montaigne by Jerome Hanover & Gerard Uferas (240 pages)

Release date : 15 Oct 2013


*Amazon.co.uk

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