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28-07-2007
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Yeah ... I can understand the negative feelings because it seems so contrary to making "art" and being creative.

However, whether or not people like it, they need to understand that fashion is a business, first and foremost. Forecasters sort of grease the skids for retailers and designers who are looking to move product and make a profit for thier stockholders.

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28-07-2007
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I think when they travel to all the same places and do the same research, it's more like they're reviewing what all the people in general are doing. This way they can have a better guess at what will become popular and sell in all the shops. I think there's another name for this kind of job, but it's a similar idea

I'm not sure what you mean about the inspiration part...
I guess it can be called inspiration if for example the theme for next season was said to be maybe athleticism; and a designer chooses swimwear as a the focus for their collection, as the inspiration
Working off from an idea that they think will sell

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17-09-2007
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ele
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I want to do forecasting so badly... how do i get into this kind of job? i have no experience yet but i know i cant do it.. where does one begin ?

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30-10-2007
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one thing that's interesting about forecasting i think is that one motivation for companies to use forecasts is to make their product resonate as best it can with consumers at a given point in time (like a season) based on demographic/economic/psychographic and other currents..

and then coordination of trends allows for there to be identifiable, or more clearly discernable, trends that the press/brands/retailers can then market to consumers..while designers still produce diverse interpretations of the trends..

haha i'm such a nerd but soooo fascinated by this process.

a question for anybody w/ experience - i wonder if designer brands and mass market brands use forecasts equally? i would think no, or that they use different ones?

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03-11-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elschic111 View Post
one thing that's interesting about forecasting i think is that one motivation for companies to use forecasts is to make their product resonate as best it can with consumers at a given point in time (like a season) based on demographic/economic/psychographic and other currents..

and then coordination of trends allows for there to be identifiable, or more clearly discernable, trends that the press/brands/retailers can then market to consumers..while designers still produce diverse interpretations of the trends..

haha i'm such a nerd but soooo fascinated by this process.

a question for anybody w/ experience - i wonder if designer brands and mass market brands use forecasts equally? i would think no, or that they use different ones?
yeah it seems like there are too many forecasting services... for example you have ones specific to colour and then ones to just fabric and then fashion
i think the textile side is quite fascinating
they have neat sort of ambiguous airy fairy mystical explanations of themes

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27-11-2007
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Question!
Hey,

I am a fashion student in my last year at university. I have pondered over many jobs within the fashion industry and I always come back to fashion forecasting. There is something about it that makes me want to work in the sector so much.

I have been in contact with a woman who is going to hire me as an assistant, she sells trend books for a big company and is based in London. I would most like to work in the research or design sector of fashion forecasting, I was just wondering for those who work in the sector already if this is still a good idea to do work experience selling books? I dont want it to be a waste of time.

Thanks

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02-12-2007
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it won't be a waster of time..you'll learn more about it there than anywhere else...
you are lucky to have found that woman...
it will lead to other things..

go for it...

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03-12-2007
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Cool, I was more for the idea than not just abit concerned as im going to have to live in London unpaid so I guess it means night and weekend jobs for me then!

Cheers

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01-04-2008
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Thought I might revive this thread since it's a big interest of mine.

I'm currently a 1st year undergrad student planning to pursue a joint major in marketing and international business. Would this path be compatible with forecasting? I thought I would marry my interest in market research with my interest in fashion. When I think about my personal skills, I think this job is what I would do best at. I can't really see myself working in an industry that doesn't involve design.

I'm just now beginning to think about how I can get my foot in the door. I'd like to apply for a job during the summer semester since I won't have classes. What would I be able to apply for with my limited work experience but lots of fashion savvyness? Keep in mind I live in Vancouver, which isn't the most established city fashion-wise (slow, so painfully slow).

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10-04-2008
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^ Are you looking to do forecasting in Vancouver, shutterbug? I wonder if jobs like that are available there.. I'd assume forecasting agencies exist mostly in places where they'd design and manufacture garments, because you'd need the forecast before designing, you know?
I can only think of smaller independent labels in Vancouver that would design and produce garments locally.. and they're generally non-trends based, so a forecaster isn't really essential , although I must say , market research is important in any business and a designer could make use of someone who could do that since it takes a bit of time and running around to all the different shows, locations, etc.

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14-04-2008
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im studying law now (well, by god's mistake i should say). i will finish it in one year and then i would like to study something fashion related as im sure that this is what i actually want to do.
and in the fashion industry, styling and trenspotting look the most interesting careers to me. could i get any use of my bachelor studies in this job? probably not too much, right?
its good that at least i have one plus - some baggage of experience in journalism.
and talking about studies, i think that its more usefull to study something realted to fashion forecasting yes? or no? i think this would be very usefull for any fashion related career.

waiting for advices.. thanks

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12-10-2008
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Though this might interest potential fashion forecasters:


Quote:
This is Luttifi Madjid, the Fashion Forecaster for Nordstrom's. It turns out that Nordstrom's forecasts the direction of fashion a full year in advance, so he was actually measuring the pulse of fashion for Spring of 2010. He suggested that soft color palettes along with Gothic (think the FIT exhibition) references to medieval and victorian times might be popular.
altamiranyc

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12-10-2008
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ah! I've heard of him before, but never had a chance to google his photo :p now I see how he looks like. thanks Marvystone!

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12-10-2008
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Thanks Marvystone that's really interesting, karma to you!

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02-11-2008
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Quote:
interview with the CEO
Interview with Trendstop CEO Jaana Jätyri
  • 1. What is Trendstop? Trendstop.com is the online trend book - We cover all aspects of fashion trend inspiration, whether you are interested in trend forecasts for Summer 2010, street fashion photos from Tokyo or close-up shots of the latest runway shows.
  • 2. Where are you based? Our trend HQ is in London, where we have a team of researchers, analysts and writers that sorts through global trend research. Our research is provided by a worldwide network of trend hunters based in key cities around the world, including London, New York, L.A., Tokyo, Paris, Milan, Berlin, Barcelona and Moscow.
  • 3. How do you forecast trends? Are you creating trends? Trend forecasting is a form of market research. We track down the early adopters of new fashion looks and our experienced analysts draw conclusions on when a particular look is likely to hit the mainstream. This gives our Clients time to react to forthcoming trends, and get their collections ready in time for the demand.
  • 4. In an average working week, where do you go to look for trends? How many hours do you spend doing this? We are specialist trend spotters, so we really eat, beathe and sleep trends 24/7, wherever we are. This week we've been to Milan Fashion Week, Premiere Vision fabric show in Paris, Colette (the coolest store in Europe), pop concerts of Gwen Stefani and Prince, the Green is the New Black launch in Hoxton, Doors and Concrete off Carnaby St and some vintage stores in Brighton.
  • 5. How do you get all the information onto the website? The site is updated daily with average five new trend stories or galleries. The beauty of an online service is that the information can be constantly updated, and publishing can happen really fast. This means that if we spot a trend today, it will be on the site tomorrow.
  • 6. What does Trendstop do for the clients? We're a bit like having your on-desk research assistant when you don't have the time for the legwork or the extra budget to hire a full-blown research team. We make sure the Client is aware of all the global trends they need to know and we translate cool trend concepts into wearable commercial fashions.
    Clients also use us to get presentation, visual merchandizing, styling and photo shoot ideas.
  • 7. Who are your clients? Our clients are anyone who needs accurate, cutting-edge and commercially viable trend information, from freelance designers to global corporations such as Hewlett Packard and Sony Ericsson.
  • 8. Who can benefit from the information Trendstop offers? Our multi-leveled research covers all fashion market levels from catwalk couture to mass produced fast fashion. Designers, buyers and stylists all benefit from Trendstop's vast and detailed content.
    As well as the obvious fashion clients, we know that companies outside of the main clothing industry find Trendstop's many sections and cultural analysis a great tool for research on color, lifestyle and youth trends.
    We also encourage young groundbreaking designers to subscribe as we know that our service can aid them. After three seasons a young designer loses their new status and needs to hit trends in shape, color or detail, in combination with their signature look to attract a wider range of buyers and press enabling further growth.
  • 9. Jaana, tell us about your background? I come from Finland but moved to London at the age of 19 to study fashion. I graduated from Central St Martins with first class honors in 1999.
    During my internship in the mid-1990's I got involved with training fashion designers to use CAD software. As well as training, it became my job to help CAD-illiterate designers at mass manufacturers to get their basic design shapes into the computer. I drew for them libraries of skirts, shirts, jackets etc. as well as all the detailing, such as pockets, collars, zips etc. to go with them.
    I discovered that each company needed similar garment basics, so soon after I graduated I set up my first company, which would sell pre-made computerized design libraries for the fashion industry. My first clients were Marks & Spencer and River Island.
    As well as basic shapes, designers wanted to know what the trend shapes for next season were - would skirts be pencil, pleated, short or long? Drawing trend specs based on the catwalks became a natural progression.
    Over the years the trend research team and the scope of our analysis grew and in 2004 it became our main business.
trendstop

Some jobs available:
Quote:
Freelance TREND SPOTTER: Milan, L.A., Moscow, Antwerp, Barcelona, Berlin, NYC.
Trendstop is expanding its exciting store & street trend galleries. We are looking for additional savvy, switched-on Freelance Trend Spotters in the above cities.


Requirements
Do you have a passion for photography and fashion?
Do you hang out in all the cool places?
Do you live, breathe and vibe into trends 24/7?
If the answer is yes! yes!! yes!!! then we’d love to hear from you.


Salary:Freelance rate per photo & per word. Please apply for details.

To Apply: Email your covering letter and 10 of your best street style / street art / store snaps to jobs@trendstop.com Make the subject line 'Global Trendspotter + Your City'
Quote:
SENIOR TREND RESEARCHER
Be part of the coolest trend team on the planet! The successful candidate will be responsible for coordinating, finalising, editing and pre-approving fashion trend stories, and liaising with the Trend Director on future fashion trends and their sourcing.


Requirements
  • It is vital that you are absolutely switched on when it comes to the latest trends, brands and products.
  • You have previous trend spotting or forecasting experience and strive for the highest standards in research and analysis.
  • You have excellent team working skills that enable you to assist the Trend Director and Trend Editor to get the best out of the team.
  • Your excellent computer and organisational skills allow you to conduct and finalize trend research promptly and efficiently, ensuring understanding and communication of trend and its application.
  • We like to see some vision and passion in our team members!
Salary:to £25,000 p/a

To Apply: Email your CV and covering letter jobs@trendstop.com, inserting 'Senior Trend Researcher' as email subject.

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