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02-08-2006
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Fashion Journalism
I have always pictured myself writing for a fashion magazine, my dream would be for Vogue (obviously!), or even Teen Vogue. I was just wondering if there are any fashion journalists here and if you have any tips or tricks for getting into the industry...as well what schools did you go to?? I live in Vancouver, so if there is a school in Canada that anyone knows of let me know!!

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04-08-2006
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im a journalist and have always wanted to really work with with fashion magazines. basically to get started you need a degree in journalism and a heavy background in fashion. possibly even as a minor. also work on your writing and try to get an internship with a magazine or such and start your career from that.

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10-08-2006
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I'd love to work for a fashion magazine but be in charge of doing the foreign correspondant articles what have you. That way I would feel like I was using my profession to spread some messages very important to me (though I don't know how socially conscious most fashion magazines are) but still be around "fashion," a passion.

BTW, i'm a senior now, so I'm trying to finish off all this college stuff and looking to be a journalism major. So.. that's the relevance

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13-10-2006
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If intending to make a living by contributing to magazines like Vogue as a freelance writer, you'll end up very thin indeed and probably evicted from your home for non-payment of the rent. Most people in the business use such titles as a showcase for their work but make money freelancing for newspapers and newspaper supplements once they have managed to get a couple of pieces published in one of the better international editions of Vogue. Elle is OK but Harper's Bazaar probably outdoes it in terms of pitching yourself at a certain level, the dumbing-down process of recent years notwithstanding. Many Vogue freelancers either have trust funds behind them or work anonymously as copywriters for fashion and luxury goods firms, which can pay quite well. I hope I don't come across as overly cynical or discouraging. I'm telling you this from the viewpoint of a former Vogue contributor and contributing editor as well as a former features editor of Vogue Hommes International. I never treated writing for glossy mags as anything other than a promotional tool that opened doors to lucrative advertising and PR-related commissions. As long as you remain realistic about it, go for it and give it your best shot. I mean, if an upstart like me can bluff my way into not just writing for these titles but editing them, then what's stopping you from having a go?

LOL!

PK


Last edited by prosperk; 13-10-2006 at 11:11 AM.
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13-10-2006
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^ excellent post and so very on the point

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17-10-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prosperk
If intending to make a living by contributing to magazines like Vogue as a freelance writer, you'll end up very thin indeed and probably evicted from your home for non-payment of the rent. Most people in the business use such titles as a showcase for their work but make money freelancing for newspapers and newspaper supplements once they have managed to get a couple of pieces published in one of the better international editions of Vogue. Elle is OK but Harper's Bazaar probably outdoes it in terms of pitching yourself at a certain level, the dumbing-down process of recent years notwithstanding. Many Vogue freelancers either have trust funds behind them or work anonymously as copywriters for fashion and luxury goods firms, which can pay quite well. I hope I don't come across as overly cynical or discouraging. I'm telling you this from the viewpoint of a former Vogue contributor and contributing editor as well as a former features editor of Vogue Hommes International. I never treated writing for glossy mags as anything other than a promotional tool that opened doors to lucrative advertising and PR-related commissions. As long as you remain realistic about it, go for it and give it your best shot. I mean, if an upstart like me can bluff my way into not just writing for these titles but editing them, then what's stopping you from having a go?

LOL!

PK

i am soo excited to know some of these things because i am only a freshman in high school as well as an aspiring fashion journalist. i have had some peices published like some poetry in a book and i just recently had an article published in a hospital newsletter which i wrote this summer as a small project at my job. i worked on the newspaper and yearbook at my middle school and i'm working on the same thing for high school. i have no idea what it is that I need to know but I consideer myself to be a pretty good writer and i am head over heels ,for you guessed it...FASHION. I really love to read fashion mags but i'm mostly intrested in things like the fashion spreads and ad campaigns . (although i still want to write)


WHAT ON EARTH DO I DO NEXT?????????...ANYONE????

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20-10-2006
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I think you're doing exactly what you need to be doing. You're doing it...you're actually writing things and getting them published. Everyone has to start somewhere. My first jobs were on a hospital radio station because I talk proper - worst moment: an old dear croaking on me in mid-live interview - and then for a television news agency writing captions on a live telex link for a satellite upload. That was a sink-or-swim situation and a half! If I had screwed up, it would have cost the agency thousands. On my first try-out, they told me it was just a practice run with dummy film. It wasn't...

I was eighteen. I then went off and did other things before drifting back to journalism, which is the last refuge of the unemployable, media and journalism courses at college being the first refuge. Joking aside, speaking seriously now, degrees in media studies and journalism tend to prevent job applicants from even getting an interview with most editors and publishers. Journalism remains one of the few professions in which on-the-job experience wins out over diplomas and degrees every time. Of course, those who run degree courses - and those who wasted three years taking them - will argue otherwise for obvious reasons. In the end, the proof is in the inescapable fact that it's one of those jobs you can either do or can't do.

It sounds as if you have what it takes to do it because, for a start, you've already moved your arse and gotten some of your stuff published. It is just as uncomplicated in 'the real world'. If you have good ideas, an ability to communicate them well in writing, a bit of front - but without being abrasive - and you are reasonably reliable and, importantly, easy to deal with, you'll quickly encounter editors who will publish you. Trust me, finding good, reliable writers to fill up those pages between the ads is one of the biggest problems editors face.

Start offering small pieces to your local newspapers. Anything you think is newsworthy. Build up the basis of a portfolio and then you can look at specialising in fashion writing. You see, when you call up the commissioning editor of some lifestyle or fashion glossy with an idea for, say, a front-of-book filler piece to get things rolling, he/she/it will take you more seriously if you can say that you've been writing stuff for the East Giggleswick Thunderer or the Catsfart Post. If you call up and say "Hi! I have a degree in journalism and media studies and I want to write about fashion stuff for you!" - I've had calls like that - you'll be written off before you have closed your mouth.

What do you do next? Keep getting published. If, in the end, you find that you are more drawn to the fashion editorial and advertising side of things, you could always consider diversifying into what we call "creative services", which encompasses copywriting, translation and editing and other communication tools-related writing-based skills alongside more advanced stuff like, for example, writing advertisements and clips, which is a form of screenwriting. The world, my lad, is your lobster, as Conran (I think) once said. If you do want to do the university thing, read for a degree that has nothing to do with any of this. Choose something useful, in case you come over all vocational later on in life and want to become a psychologist or something.

PK


Last edited by prosperk; 20-10-2006 at 05:57 AM.
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21-10-2006
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No one has seemed to answer this completely, but as a writer for a magazine...not someone who freelances but someone who is hired by the magazine & is put in charge or stories and reports about them. What is an average salary exactly for these people in numbers? Not that I'm money hungry, but I'm considering pursuing such a career & want to know how stable such a thing is. I've always wanting something excited like writing for a magazine, & I even considered music journalism as an option but have recently set my sights on Fashion. I understand all the work I'd have to do to land a job of that sort, most of it is obvious things that I'd expect an employer @ a magazine like that to be looking for in the first place. So basically I would just like to know how much do these people really make to offer themselves a decent living?

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22-10-2006
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OK, as a sometime features editor and commissioning editor, I'll bite. Your question is hard to answer concisely because different publishing houses pay different rates and different magazines within a given publishing house pay different rates as well. It depends on experience, negotiating skills and, where fashion and lifestyle glossies are concerned, what sort of contacts you have in your 'little black book'...or Blueberry. Some features editors are paid as little as €40k per annum. Others see about €60k. I know some who are paid far more than this but this is because the publishers - or the Editor-in-Chief - wanted or needed them far more than they wanted or needed the job. If you want precise figures relating to particular titles and publishing houses, you could do some research of your own. That's what journalists do.

PK


Last edited by prosperk; 22-10-2006 at 02:56 AM.
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22-10-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prosperk
OK, as a sometime features editor and commissioning editor, I'll bite. Your question is hard to answer concisely because different publishing houses pay different rates and different magazines within a given publishing house pay different rates as well. It depends on experience, negotiating skills and, where fashion and lifestyle glossies are concerned, what sort of contacts you have in your 'little black book'...or Blueberry. Some features editors are paid as little as €40k per annum. Others see about €60k. I know some who are paid far more than this but this is because the publishers - or the Editor-in-Chief - wanted or needed them far more than they wanted or needed the job. If you want precise figures relating to particular titles and publishing houses, you could do some research of your own. That's what journalists do.

PK
haha, that is what journalists do! thanks for trying to clarify it for me though. I know it's very hard to break into, but it's something I'm also willing to work very hard for. It's something though that I've considered recently so I've only just begun researching it, & happenned to start here first. I'll definitely do more looking into it though.

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22-10-2006
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I'm glad you saw the funny side of it. You're gonna be needing a sense of humour... It's not that hard to break into. You just have be committed.

PK

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04-11-2006
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Just wondering, are trend reports and runway reviews part of fashion journalism?

Coz that is all I want to spend the whole day writing and I really suck writing interviews and articles .

But I really want to do fashion journalism...


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04-11-2006
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Journalists by default should be able to write about anything - not just about fashion. Most fashion journalists don't start out writing exclusively about fashion or anything in particular... You can say that fashion is your niche, but as a journalist, you should be able to research and write about anything asked of you.

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05-11-2006
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^ Thanks!

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05-11-2006
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I'm planning on getting into fashion journalism as well. I used to write short stories when I was a kid, and everyone always said how good they were - teachers, my parents friends, whoever. I was a history major and I got used to writing papers in really short periods of time, these really in-depth research papers with cited sources, in hours and I'd make an A. Then the dean of my school contacted me and said that she'd read some of my writing and thought I was really amazing and I should consider a career in journalism. Well, I switched my major, and fashion journalism is where my heart really is.

I'm 19, and I want to wait until I get out of college to move to New York, and I plan on probably working retail and trying to get internships.

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