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02-03-2007
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does anyone know any good fashion blogs or sites to submit articles to?

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04-03-2007
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Why don't you try submitting to blogs you think suit your writing style Ms Prissy? And they should obviously have your respect and so forth if you're going to have your stuff on their websites.

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06-03-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alleluia
It's my dream to become a journalist. Most of all a writer in a fashion magazine. My question is, is it really really tough to get into one? It's probably been asked before and I heard it's really cut throat. So my plan right now is to study journalism of all kinds and maybe intern and work at a newspaper for a start? I really don't see myself working with fashion journalism for a long awhile until I get some experience.
That's a refreshing, intelligent attitude. You can never learn too much, as the old saying goes. Some of the intellectual snobs one encounters in journalism sneer at fashion writers, implying that they are not real journalists. Okay, it's true that there are some serious airheads wasting space in fashion magazine offices but that is hardly exclusive to the fashion and style press.

There are some very serious-minded fashion journalists and editors. Some of them have only ever written on fashion, style and related topics while others have broader resumés. If you want to study some of the best out there, look for fashion-related stuff by writers like Suzy Menkes, Marion Hume, Godfrey Deeny, Natasha Fraser and Horacio Silva, to name a few of the anglophone ones. They're professional, talented and versatile, in that they can write well about anything if they have to, because they respect the profession before anything else. Self-respect and ethics are still important even if it often seems otherwise.

It can be tough to get a start but far from impossible. As I've said elsewhere, they gave me a job so anyone can do it. I am not sure that fashion journalism per se could be described as cut-throat - in the context, say, of brawling tabloid hacks - but there are, as everywhere, some very bitter and twisted boys and girls in fashion media. I suppose it's tough if one's job depends on keeping them sweet but then, if one is that scared of bullies, then journalism might not be the best career choice.

But as I said, your attitude is good. You may chance upon some other form of journalism or reporting that appeals to you but as long as you end up being able to pay the rent, so to speak, from writing, then you're doing something right.

PK

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06-03-2007
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Just a side note - Marion Hume is speaking at the L'Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival today.

http://www.lmff.com.au/Business-Seminar.aspx

I was dying to go but it really wasn't cheap to attend the Business Seminar. A friend of mine is attending and is going to report back to me on everyone's tips.

They always seem to get a lot of top industry people to attend, from Jane Sheppard from Topshop who will speak about how the brand revived its image, Jasper Conran, and of course Marion Hume.

Should be interesting to see what they said - shame the seminar doesn't finish for another 5 - 6 hours or I'd be bugging my friend for tips! Will post them up as soon as possible for you all.

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06-03-2007
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If they don't have a few reduced price places reserved at that seminar for students or 'young people', to allow a loose definition, that's a bit of an oversight. $450.00 is quite steep. Mind you, they had to fly in and look after all of those speakers for a start, and that's far from cheap. Still, a reduced tarif for bona fide starters in the business would have been smart.

It's funny that Marion Hume is speaking there. I remember how she used to be slagged off in Oz when she was Editor-in-Chief of Australian Vogue. She put noses out of joint as soon as she stepped off the plane from England by writing harsh but honest editorials about the state of the industry in Australia. Now they're inviting her as a top speaker at Melbourne Fashion Week. Ain't that always the way...

I'll call her when she gets back 'topside' and ask her about the seminar. If I get anything likely to be helpful to any of you, I'll post it here as well. J J Picart is also well worth listening to. He's forgotten more about the business than most people even know.

PK


Last edited by prosperk; 06-03-2007 at 08:35 PM.
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07-03-2007
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how old is too old to do an internship for journalism?
i've been working as an art director, but have been writing on the side...

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07-03-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kimair
how old is too old to do an internship for journalism?
i've been working as an art director, but have been writing on the side...
Most people intern between the ages 18-25 so if you ask me I would concider 25-30 to be a gray zone and 30 to be old.

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07-03-2007
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I'm on Condé Nast's webpage looking for editorial jobs and have found out that they have only listed american citys as geographical areas. Does anyone know where I can apply for jobs in europe? Or does Condé Nast and their magazines carry out all their editorial work i the US?

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08-03-2007
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Condé Nast International oversees foreign markets and each country that has its own CN titles, including Vogue, GQ and so on, generally has a domestic Condé Nast holding company, which may operate under licence or as a joint venture.

Here. for instance, is British Vogue's website: http://www.vogue.co.uk/. I am sure, if you trawl around long enough using Google, you will dig up all sorts of contact information. Here's a general e-mail for Condé Nast France: infos@condenast.fr. It really depends on which title you want to work for, in which country and what languages you speak.

PK

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12-03-2007
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Starting in Fashion Journalism
I am currently studying a ND Fashion & Clothing Diploma as well as A-Level English Language and want to go onto study Fashion Journalism at either Epsom or the London College of Fashion. I have already had two articles published in my local newspaper and another soon to be published in our college magazine. I was wondering if anybody had any advice to give me to get into London College of Fashion and the fashion journalism world in general. Eventually I would love to write for magazines such as i-D, Dazed & Confused, Another Magazine, Pop and Vogue but I know I will have to start much further down the scale. I am planning on taking a gap year at the end of this year to get my head together and gain some work experiance. Any advice you could give on places to ask for work experience or an internship and how to go about applying would be brilliant. Also any tips for becoming a fashion journalist would be great!
Thank you

x

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12-03-2007
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oh please.. somebody respond to this thread, because i have the exact same question as modern_romance.

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12-03-2007
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i'd suggest reading this thread from the beginning...
there's a few members who had similar questions, and some people have had some very helpful answers...

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14-03-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olivia
oh please.. somebody respond to this thread, because i have the exact same question as modern_romance.
Getting into the world of journalism in all about working your way from the bottom to the top. As soon as you have got your first job you can start working your way up the ranks and move from magazines to magazines.
Write, write and write even more and try to get your stuff published in fashion magazines. After your articles have been posted in a few magazines you can start applying to big magazines like Vogue, Elle and Vanity Fair.
Your success depend partly on your writing skills but mostly on your knowledge and expertise in the subject.

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19-03-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prosperk
It's funny that Marion Hume is speaking there. I remember how she used to be slagged off in Oz when she was Editor-in-Chief of Australian Vogue. She put noses out of joint as soon as she stepped off the plane from England by writing harsh but honest editorials about the state of the industry in Australia. Now they're inviting her as a top speaker at Melbourne Fashion Week. Ain't that always the way...

I'll call her when she gets back 'topside' and ask her about the seminar. If I get anything likely to be helpful to any of you, I'll post it here as well. J J Picart is also well worth listening to. He's forgotten more about the business than most people even know.

PK
It is ironic huh? I am a little too young to have seen the brunt of all the backlash, but after some research when her book came out (which I love - and since working in the Australian magazine industry I've got my suspicions) about who's who.

Shame Marion's gone, Australian publishing really needs to be so la di da and take the reins and an authorative figure in Australian fashion. I think Aus Harpers is starting to do it, while Vogue is lagging behind.

Now back to why I posted in the first place... I would post tips from the business seminar, but my so called friend who used my website to get a media pass to all the events, has gone MIA. And boy amd I peeved. She's completely dropped off the face of the earth and is not answering her phone or taking my emails. URGH.

Shame because I really want to make my "online magazine" better and would love to bring a few people on board to help me (and themselves) as my side career - because currently my career career isn't going so well. Long story, I won't bore you all with it.

As for other journalists to watch... I'm really liking Jamie Huckbody's writing of late, the stuff he's done years ago in the UK, and now with Aus Harpers. It's refreshing because during the Aus Fashion Week SS06 last year he really told it like he saw it - that certain designers looked like their pieces were straight off a European designer's catwalk (my thoughts exactly).

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20-03-2007
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Marion's book was funny, especially when one can guess upon whom some of the characters were based. It was gently savage in places. Some people didn't get the allegorical nature of the cake shop reveries. Put bluntly, she was taking the piss. However, her book didn't have the bitterness of, say, The Devil Wears Prada, which was of course heavily toned down when turned into a script and given the requisite Hollywood happy ending. Still, Marion Hume's experience in the top job at Oz Vogue was a textbook bad one, with friends who stabbed her in the back quite viciously - even by Planet Fashion's worst standards - and a directorship that left her out there for the wolves afterwards. So she sued them, won and then wrote a satirical book.

She had a hard time. I ran her Paris set-up and remember persuading Peter Lindbergh to shoot a cover for Oz Vogue. Now, this wasn't too hard as Peter and I know one another and he'd previously shot a cover for the mag but the sticking point was that Oz Condé Nast had stiffed his team for their expenses, including the hair and make-up by Odile Gilbert and Stéphane Marais respectively. Nevertheless, Peter Lindbergh knew that it would be a coup for me - and so did the others - so they did it. That's an example of the kind of people who get to the top in Fashion and stay there but without screwing people over. They're generous. Oh, you can choose to be a total sh1t and you can and often will make it but you'll be living under siege from all the people you dicked over on the way up. maybe you need to tell your friend that if she is, indeed, blanking you.

Anyway, Peter shot Rachel Roberts for the cover. And the working prints were fantastic. Rachel is a natural blonde - as opposed to an aircraft blonde - and has slightly frizzy hair and quite generous lips. With me so far? Good! Now, we had this hair stylist on the job and when I saw him approaching with the straightening irons, I headed him off. "But we usually straighten her hair...", said he. "No, let's have her as she is. She looks great and this is for Australian readers, you know, healthy, outdoors kind of people..." I replied, in my idealistic naivety.

Marion Hume loved the images. However, the publisher vetoed them. I got a call at stupid-o-clock saying that they wouldn't be used after all. As I had to tell Peter Lindbergh, I insisted upon a reason. I got one: the publisher - who happened to the sort of buttockclenching suburban English crypto-fascist who emigrated to places like Rhodesia and Australia back in the 1960s - had looked at them and pointed out that Vogue Australia's readers were white and that putting a black or a "dyed blonde half-caste" on the cover would kill sales.

He'd looked at Rachel Roberts with her full lips and frizzy hair and decided that she must be partly black. I am glad to say that he was sacked unceremoniously not long after this by Jonathan Newhouse who is no racist. I don't know if this episode figured in his sacking but it was by no means an isolated one during my time working for Oz Vogue. Marion Hume, as I said, had a tough time dealing with such attitudes there. But she did a good job, forcing the industry in Australia to take a long, hard look at itself.

Yes, it is indeed ironic...

PK


Last edited by prosperk; 20-03-2007 at 02:04 AM.
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