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11-01-2006
  16
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Join Date: Jun 2002
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Fashion Marketing
there are so many interesting articles on fashion Marketing, thought of creating a thread so i could share with you guys..

here from wwd of today
Quote:
Catch the Millennials (If You Can)
By Valerie Seckler

In a world where teens and twentysomethings increasingly are in control of their media choices, and partake of them while on the move, fashion marketers face more complex decisions about how best to connect with the age group that spends the most on apparel. Those clothing purchases amount to about $40 billion annually among the Millennial generation's 11- to 28-year-olds, according to NPD Fashionworld.

Further, as rapidly emerging media become more popular, fashion players, particularly those brands targeting Millennials, could devote more of their marketing budgets to emerging media. These media include:
  • TV programs, music videos and fashion shows that can be downloaded to computers, video-enabled iPods or portable video game players. New services such as Yahoo Go, most of which is slated to roll out by the end of the first quarter, will enable sharing of digital content across such devices.
  • Real-time marketing messages obtained from electronic billboards by pointing a mobile phone at those ads to prompt responses.
  • Short segments of TV programs, Web content, commercials and music that can be listened to or viewed on video-enabled mobile phones. For instance, Verizon has plans to launch V Cast Music on Monday, a service that will facilitate music downloads to the mobile phones of as many as 30 million of its subscribers.
"The key is to reach teens and young adults in as many places as possible," advised Amanda Freeman, vice president at trend forecaster The Intelligence Group. "High-fashion designers aren't doing this yet; there's a sense they're above it," Freeman continued. "But these are savvy consumers who need to be reached. It's sort of taking Lucky to the next level."

Fashion minds may change as new technologies increasingly free up youths and young adults to dip into media of their choosing at any time and in almost any setting, whether for the purpose of entertainment, information or making social connections. "Younger consumers tend to be early [users] of new media, and content providers are using those media for distribution of their content," said Brad Adgate, a senior vice president and director of research at media buyer Horizon Media. "There are probably fewer than one million video-enhanced mobile phones, but the content is there, and companies are racing things out."

For example, The MobiTV network ("Live television. Anywhere. Anytime.") is offering programming from 38 TV channels, including Fashion TV, Extreme Sports Mobile, Comedy Time, NBC Mobile, ABC News, ESPN 3G TV and The Shopping Network. As the Millennials move into their own homes, observed Erin Hunter, senior vice president of media and entertainment at comScore Networks, "they are likely to have one phone — and it's likely to be a cell phone."

A mobile phone that provides a camera, music and video, Hunter projected, "soon will become the expectation of the [Millennial] crowd."

There has already been significant demand from teens and twentysomethings, among others, to view replays of TV programs online, via broadband video feeds. MTV Overdrive, launched in April, claimed 11 million downloads of its Video Music Awards within two weeks of its initial air date, although the show's TV ratings were down 22 percent versus 2004, Adgate pointed out. ABC had about three million viewers of its two-hour edited version of Bob Geldof's Live 8 concert, while AOL had about five million viewers of its live, uninterrupted broadband videocast of the event in July. Within two weeks after the Live 8 concert, AOL reported another 3.5 million people had accessed the program.

The Video Music Awards Webcast, available online for one month, offered such extras as celebrity arrivals, parties and interviews. Initial advertisers on MTV Overdrive have included The Gap, Procter & Gamble, Sony Pictures and Microsoft, according to "Media on Demand," a report by Adgate published in November.

Just over half, or 51 percent, of on-demand Internet video users are ages 12 to 34, with the heaviest representation coming from 25- to 34-year-olds, who account for 24 percent of the group, based on data from Arbitron and Edison Media Research, as cited in Adgate's report. (The only age cohort with a greater share of users was 35- to 44-year-olds, among whom 25 percent were Internet video users.) People ages 12 to 17 represented 14 percent of the Internet on-demand viewers, while 18- to 24-year-olds constituted 13 percent.

Overall, 14 percent of the U.S. population, or roughly 41 million people, are on-demand users of Internet video, compared with 10 percent, or about 30 million, who are video-on-demand TV users, and 6 percent, or around 18 million, who use personal video recording devices. By 2010, virtually all of the projected 46.9 million digital cable households are expected to be video-on-demand enabled, a nearly fourfold increase from the 12.5 million with that capability in 2003.
Besides facing the challenge of engaging youths and young adults, who typically view between three and eight screen-based media daily, marketers will need to develop more sophisticated commercial content to hold the group's interest.

One early effort in this regard was made last February by Reebok, which shot five hours of Philadelphia 76ers star Allen Iverson talking about life while shooting pool. Besides 30- and 60-second commercials, Reebok assembled a broadband video commercial in the form of a "mini documentary," Adgate noted, which ran for about 90 seconds. The long-form commercial, available on demand to subscribers to Comcast interactive services in Philadelphia, was a trial run for the RBK brand's "Def on Demand," a video-on-demand program launched nationwide on Nov. 11.

"Def on Demand," an hour-long on-demand program whose content will be changed monthly, was conceived to give consumers "more and longer opportunities to interact with our brand," said Mark Fireman, director of advertising and interactive marketing at Reebok. Thirty-second TV commercials are being aired by Reebok to tell viewers about the brand's on-demand, urban and hip-hop programming, which has also included interviews with Jay-Z and 50 Cent.

Another attempt is on tap from American Apparel. Starting early this year, the retailer plans to announce various items are going on sale in real time, by sending text messages to the mobile phones of shoppers in its stores, said Mathew Swenson, senior fashion media adviser at American Apparel. The fashion brand is also considering highlighting items as they go on sale in real time at its American Apparel Web site.

Digital devices from electronic billboards to shoppers' mobile phones are expected to be used by marketers in a number of other ways to reach people in real time, including offers of digital coupons and announcements of special events. For instance, in December, Time magazine snapped digital photos of passersby in Times Square and relayed those images to a nearby billboard to highlight its "Person of the Year" issue.

Interactive marketing plays such as those created by Reebok and American Apparel can be viral, enabling users to pass them along to friends and family, and can give viewers a chance to register their opinions, while providing marketers with an opportunity to glean information about those people. In one such scenario, marketers can track viewers' searches for on-demand programs, either online or via set-top digital TV boxes, in order to develop profiles of their audiences' tastes, much as Amazon has tracked its users' book purchases so it can recommend titles of likely interest to repeat shoppers.

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02-03-2006
  17
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Join Date: Feb 2006
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Fashion Marketing studies
I am 17 and would like to pursue a career in fashion marketing, so after school i'll be going to NIFT in india, the only good and reputable fashion institute in the country, can't afford anything in Europe or the US yet. The only problem is tht NIFT doesn't offer any degrees or courses in fashion marketing, all it has is fashion design, fashion technology and fashion journalism. So i thought i'd do a 4 year degree in design and then go to Europe or the states for a masters in fashion marketing.
Is this the best way for me to do fashion marketing? or should i just do normal marketing for graduate and then do fashion marketing as my masters?
also what's the career like? is it extremely competitive? are there any prospects?
I would appreciate any help, i'm pretty lost and there's no one around who can help me

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02-03-2006
  18
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Join Date: Oct 2005
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It's a lovely institute, I totally agree with u, if u enjoy design as well

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04-03-2006
  19
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If you really want to do fashion marketing -- then I do NOT recommend that you do a 4 year degree in fashion design. Here's why -- you'd be wasting an inordinate amount of time, energy, and money on supplies doing something that is very different from the skills you need for marketing.

Having said that, I do believe that a fashion design certificate program or associates degree program could give you important insight into the design and garment construction process which could benefit your fashion marketing career.

I would recommend a general business marketing program to you, then maybe you could come to the U.S. and do an associates degree program in fashion marketing -- which would be cheaper than the masters degree...and very productive. But for fashion marketing you do not need 4 years of garment design and construction...a great deal of hard work and lack of sleep for something that doesnt benefit you directly.

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04-03-2006
  20
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I agree with marrimoda. Quite a few people who are in fashion marketing don't even have a 'fashion marketing' degree, instead just an ordinary Business or Commerce degree with a major in marketing, or a Marketing degree.

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05-03-2006
  21
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Ahh, this is great help for me.. i'm thinking about doing ethier parson's Design and management or, the FIT Associates in fashion marketing, followed by the two years abroad at the polimoda in florence!!

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06-03-2006
  22
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A Parisian university and also one in Monte Carlo (IUM) do specialist MBAs in Luxury Brand management. I posted an article about it a couple of days ago http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...mba-40999.html

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07-03-2006
  23
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Join Date: Feb 2006
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Thanks everyone for your replies, until now had no idea what to do

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19-03-2006
  24
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of those choices I'd say fashion journalism because that is a form of marketing

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23-04-2006
  25
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Join Date: Oct 2004
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fashion merchandising/marketing
i was wondering what specific job areas can you go into with a bachelors in fashion merchandising or marketing?can you use a degree in either one to go into public relations?and one last question that which career will have less mathematical skills involved merchadising,marketing or advertising? sorry to bother with this but im really want to know about this.

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18-05-2006
  26
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Some info wanted please
This is my first post ever..So, HI to everybody!
I am very glad that ive found that site
ANYWAYS....
I am a fashion marketing student in Montreal, Canada and i VERY like it.It is a passsiion. But lately, I have been asking myself: Where is it gonna lead myself in the end?
I mean i really DO love fashion, but im a bit worried about job offers. Also, i dont even know what i wanna do at the end.
I would love to work with fashion shows and stuff, stylist or even in sales.
So my question is...Do any of you study in Fashion or are actually IN the bussiness that can help me really distinguish the jobs in Fashion Marketing?
THANK YOU veryy much and im so sorry if my post isnt very clear. Im just very confused

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19-05-2006
  27
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Join Date: Feb 2005
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I'm not in fashion but during fashion week in Chicago they were advertising for interns. Generally unpaid jobs. Maybe you could travel to New York, L.A. Chicago or Toronto next season and gain some experience and get advice.

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30-05-2006
  28
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Fashion Marketing
What kind of degree do you need to be involved with fashion Marketing? I want to do this so badly. What does this job entail? how can i get hired to do this job? HELP HELP thanks

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30-05-2006
  29
scenester
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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are you in any fashion schools because they have the best contacts and information to give. all i know is that you get really far if you have more than a two year degree

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07-06-2006
  30
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Advice about Fashion Marketing Education.
HEY!
Yesturday i went shopping downtown Montreal where i live and i talked with that girl from American Apparel. As we were talking, i learned that this girl almost brought all the American Apparel in NYC, Miami, etc.
She is amazing and only 26 of age. Anyway, my point is that i am a Fashion Marketing student at Lasalle College in Montreal.
All i hear from people of the industry is that i DONT need my College Diploma to start a career.It is pretty depressing. The girl from American Apparel told me she went to Lasalle before and she ended with no such jobs.Here is her advice: Go directly to University in a MARKETING degree and NOT a FASHION marketing program....She told me that once you get 30 years of age you are tired with working 7 days per week and work your butt off in the industry.A general marketing degree can lead you into fashion industry AND in the general marketing business too...
This is SO not the first time someone of the industry gives me these kind of advice..
what do you all think!?

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