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15-08-2006
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The Process of doing Editorials or Photo Shoots for Magazines
hello,

i'm wondering if someone would be kind to give me an overview of how a fashion editorial piece comes together (who is involved (everyone who is involved!.......) , what does everyone do to contribute, and what happens in order) from the beginning to the end?


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15-08-2006
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you have a LOT of questions!!!...


...

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17-08-2006
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yes i do =(

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17-08-2006
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read jo dingemans book...the styling one... will give you a good overview w/o asking some poor soul here to write the book out for you. really, you need to just get out and do it... cant expect to know everything at the beginning.. thats what learning is for!

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18-08-2006
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There was an issue of British Vogue from a couple of years ago that featured a diary of an editorial. It was shot by Nick Knight, using a spotlight and two models. Sorry that is a bit vague!

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11-08-2007
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A Brief Summary of a Photo Shoot for Magazines
Was recently asked, "How do you put a Fashion Shoot together?"

I really don't where to start...

The team is always the following: A Fashion Stylist, Hair Stylist, Make-Up Artist, Model or 's, Photographer and Assistant or 's....

A stylist is the person that chooses the clothing, shoes and accessories. The stylist is briefed before the shoot by the photographer. This briefing is a think tank session that is intended to garner a "Theme" or "Story" that will be the thread running through the whole shoot. It is like writing a storyboard. Let's say we want to do a ten page fashion story with the theme being"My Day at the Laundromat" for example. The shoot will be about a girl who has a huge pile of clothes to wash and is spending the whole day in the place while people are coming in and out as she observes the procession. All "Good" fashion stories start with a theme, from simple to complex. Well these people i.e. models are dressed in specific "Brands" of clothing that should cover a range of designers or manufactures to give a reason for it being a "Fashion" story and not just a "Model Portfolio" Yach...Sorry. All fashion magazine expect at least a six page story with a theme. Now how are you going to choreograph all of this. You are going for a ten page story. Well it could be two double pages and six single pages or three double page spreads and four single pages. On the former example you will only have to shoot seven images that being three horizontal images and four vertical. That could be done in one day but two days would be preferable. Now you have to define each of the shots in the "Story" Perhaps the first opening page could just be a picture of the Laundromat empty and void of anything except the ugly fluorescent lights and the washers and dryers. That might be where the title would be. Lets call the story "Living in a Laundromat".

The next shot could be the star of the show who might be wearing a "Miss Sixty" pair of red jeans an "H&M" blouse a pair of "Adidas" shoes and a "Victor and Rolf" Bag...Remember all magazine reason for existing is to catalogue what the designers are coming out with two to three months in advance of the product hitting the stores, so the stylist will have access to all of the press offices representing the designers showrooms. So let's continue. The next image is the introduction of the first couple or individuals coming in to do their laundry. They are perhaps passing dirty clothing to the one that is depositing the socks in to the washing machine. Perhaps it is being throw and caught etc. The story continues with different amusing vignettes and perhaps ends with a close up of the girl, still alone in the Laundromat of a close up on her sad face looking through the glass door on to the world outside...

That "IS" a fashion story.

Now that you have decided on the story, you have to decide on the rest of the team. Remember that the Fashion Stylist was chosen because she/he was appropriate for this kind of challenge and in your estimation a think tank session with this person would result in an interesting treatment. Knowing the story you both will have to find a hair and make up artist or one that is very good at both which is rare. You will be doing your casting based on looking at books of Hair and Make-up people to see if their style conforms to your treatment (story). Now that you have found the support team it is time to cast for the appropriate subjects.

In the story you decided that you needed three people. The other two will look different in each image so you could get away with just three "Models-Actors" The casting is so important in re-enforcing the theme of the story. For me stranger is better, but that is a matter of taste based on your being "Plugged In" to what the looks are that are happening today.

You will have the stylist or yourself call the model agencies and brief them with the criteria of you theme and they will respond by sending you portfolios for the purpose of honing down the selection. Once selections are made you will call the agency to have them send the chosen finalists to come for a face to face casting. The casting should be attended by the whole team. The hair and make-up artists will comment on there observations as well as the stylist and yourself, all seeing the model from a different perspective.

Once the democratic decisions are made, you will have the final decision approval authority based on their input. The agency will be called to confirm the dates you gave them when they asked "What are the shoot dates. We will send you books of talent available on those dates..."

You will get either a first or second option and hopefully a first. If you are certain of the selection confirm immediately. That will guarantee their availability.

Set the time and place of the shoot and give the agencies all of the telephone contact info and visa versa for the whole team... That is how to put together a shoot. Although a condensed version. You must also think about the flow of the story. Two full shots two close up details one beauty shot etc etc etc...

The Beginning... Ben

Image: Shot for "Citizen K International" Stylist Benoit Bethume
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DOUBLE 02.jpg (165.0 KB, 8 views)


Last edited by benjikan; 11-08-2007 at 04:30 PM.
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24-02-2009
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Making of a Photoshoot
Hi!
This is a bit embarransing to ask but I was wondering how an outdoor photoshoot is done. I mean you take photos in different locations with different outfits and you need to have a stilyst the make-up artist, the hairstyler , etc. who are going to prepare the model for the photoshoot. My question is where do this all people travel and change the model if the photoshoot is taken in for example in the jungle or hard access place.

PS. if there's another thread that explains this just pass me the link Thank you

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24-02-2009
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I found this old thread in the archives that explains the process for an editorial shoot for a magazine which I think has some good information about this topic.

It's pretty much the same way for a client's shoot (like for an ad campaign or even for their catalog) excpet that the person or company hiring you has final say about the concept and look of the final product. The client pays the for the cost of everything, so they get their choice of everything ... but the photographer, art director, and stylist still must work cooperatively to be able to present ideas to the client.



If you are speaking about a creative or test shoot, that is a different thing altogether, but the process is similar. Each person (photographer, stylist, makeup artist, model, etc.) usually pay their own expenses and everyone hopes to be able to use the images in their portfolios. So it has to be a collaboration of all parties and no one gets paid. And usually it's very low budget, because of this. Here's a thread about testing for your portfolio: About Your Portfolio and Testing, for Freelance Stylists, Hair/Makeup Artists etc.

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01-03-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vilela View Post
Hi!
This is a bit embarransing to ask but I was wondering how an outdoor photoshoot is done. I mean you take photos in different locations with different outfits and you need to have a stilyst the make-up artist, the hairstyler , etc. who are going to prepare the model for the photoshoot. My question is where do this all people travel and change the model if the photoshoot is taken in for example in the jungle or hard access place.

PS. if there's another thread that explains this just pass me the link Thank you
Why should that be embarasssing to ask?

There's no simple answer. It depends on conditions and especially on the allocated budget.

Usually the bigger the budget the more comfortable the work conditions can be made.

Accessibility is an important factor as you've typically to carry a lot of stuff, up to several hundred kg and sometimes much more especially if you need a mobile genset (electric generator set), for serious lighting you need a relatively powerful genset as small ones don't have a stable enough voltage and those battery packs strobes are rather weak and don't allow the use of powerful modeling lights anyway. Ideal is if the location is at least accessible by off-road vehicles, skidoos or snowcats. If not, either you need to carry everything or maybe even use a helicopter.

It's convenient to have one or several camping cars or trailers rather than tents. If the budget is really tight there are still awfully annoying tricks like so called foldable or portable changing rooms (models hate them, most are a hassle to use, they're like small tents about the size of a person).

Ideally you should have on-site electricity available, either from a power outlet or from a small generator. Inverters don't do it because they're usually too weak. Hair artists need quite some electrical power and makeup is hard to do without good lighting.

Also temperatures play a role, often you shoot with "offset" seasons so it's not unusual to shoot light clothes when it's cold. It's definitely a plus if you've a camping car or trailer because of heating or air conditioning. Of course, as said, it's all a question of budget and organization. It's extremely important to prepare everything very well as on location even small problems which are easily solved in the studio or in a city can bring a whole photoshoot to a halt. Insurance questions are also important as sometimes you need a special coverage extension for a single unusual photoshoot.

IMO a good preparation and organization are the key for a successful photoshoot (beside a great team of course, human relationships become even more important if your team is lost in the middle of nowhere).

These are just some examples, shooting in deep snow, in the jungle, the desert, on the beach, a highrise construction site or a railroad station are different challenges. A good photographer must be able to organize a photoshoot nearly everywhere as long as it can be done safely with a high probability of success with the given budget and delay. Of course it's a teamwork but if something fails it's always the photographer's fault.

Note that sometimes it's less expensive to shoot in a film studio than on location though film props are often not suited for still imaging because you see flaws much better on pictures than in movies.
Also many pictures you see haven't been shot on location but are the result of clever photoshopping but personally I prefer shooting on location cuz that's far more interesting.

Blunier


Last edited by Blunier; 01-03-2009 at 11:20 PM.
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09-03-2009
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Wow! I never would have guessed.
Thank you for the answer.

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12-03-2009
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You're welcome. Indeed there would be much more to say but work on location is often very different.

An important point I forgot to mention is that great location scouting often allows to shoot in much more comfortable conditions than it may look and it also allows to save money. It's easier to find locations for photography than for (TV or movie) filming because you need far less space as there are no traveling cameras, cranes or so, lighting is simpler (sort of, I mean there's less gear as there are smaller areas to light), crews are much smaller etc.
.
For example there are plenty of national parks where you can find spots which look like far away from the civilization while in reality if you'd see a 360° panorama you'd notice roads, stores, parking lots or so.
Even in the middle of Griffith Park in Los Angeles you can find some spots which look quite like lost in the middle of nowhere.

A detail many aren't aware of is that, especially in the U.S., there are many locations where you need a permit to shoot. It can apply to whole cities, national parks, or some areas like airports, metro (a.k.a. tube, underground, subway...), railroad stations... Some permits are free but for many you've to pay, typically depending on the crew size.

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12-03-2009
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Especially in L.A. ... Blunier! You technically need a permit just about everywhere except on private property. And then, the property owners here are so used to film crews and the huge amount of money they will pay for a location that it is hard to find anything inexpensive.

Magazine editorials don't pay ... or pay a very minimal amount, so there is usually no budget to pay for a fancy location, or even enough for a permit. So ... a lot of photographers often do what we call "gun & run" or "guerilla shooting" ... which is set up with as small a crew as possible, limit the lights and make sure that you can pack up and go at a moment's notice. Because ... when they shoot without permits security will often kick you out. I've seen very adept shooters talk their way into enough time to finish up ... sometimes they send a model to talk to the security guard/officer ... and bat their eyes a bit. That works many times!

Of course, gunning and running does not guarantee that you'll get your shots, so you have to have a back plan if you get kicked out ... or you just don't get your editorial in the can.

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18-04-2009
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This is a great post guys thanks so much. I have a few questions about obtaining the pieces for the shoot.

Do most beginners (like me ) buy the clothing for the shoot themselves and eat it as part of cost of doing business? Or do magazines usually offer you the pull letter readily?

I have the go from a local magazine editor to go forward with my editorial concept but I have never done "editorial" type shoots for anything other than my own portfolio.

Should I go ahead and ask him for the pull letter? And after that do i just present this to the clothing companies ? The clothing i will be using are this season's and already in the malls.

Thanks so much for any help!!

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19-04-2009
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You really need to work with a stylist ... because they will know how to do this and have the contacts. And they have a lot of work to do which you, as a photographer, won't have time to do properly. Like lining up the looks with the accessories for your approval, prepping (steaming, pinning, clamping) the wardrobe just before the shoot, helping the models dress to keep the makeup off the clothes, setting up and maintaining the wardrobe inventory, checking on each peice as it's used and making repairs and spot cleaning as it comes off, being your second set of eyes to make sure the wardrobe is looking OK (no wrinkles, gaps, sags ... and that it's lying nicely) in addition to doing all the selection, pickup and return of everything after making sure everything is in order after the shoot.

You are right, you must be commissioned by the magazine to get a pull letter ... and then you can approach publicists and designers to arrange for all the looks you need. Most magazines expect to give you one ... so just ask. You will probably also need a credit card, unless your pull letter says the magazine will take responsibilty for the clothes, etc. . And a credit card will probably be essential, even if the mag is responsible, if you are pulling from boutiques and shops. It's because you are borrowing invnetiory that is inteneded to be sold ... not just samples that are there just for lending. So boutiques are very, very fussy that everything be returned in perfect condition or they will charge you for it the moment it is returned or due to be returned.

Without a pull letter, you must buy (and probably return) unless you know some local designers who are willing to do it for some pictures, if the feature does not get picked up.

It's best to try to get clothing several days before your shoot but they often won't lend untill about 2 days before, so you have to move very quickly ... and they will want the stuff back the day after the shoot, in good condition (clean, not damaged). So a stylist is necessary just to run around and do all of this for you. You will not be going just one place but maybe as many as 10, by the time all the looks are put together to work well within your theme ... plus it's not really good styling if it all comes from only 1 or 2 designers. It's the way things from different sources get put together that determines how good the styling is ... espcieally if it's a fashion shoot.

For small local mags, you can get away with mall clothes if you shoot spring summer really early ... probably no later then March, just as the new inventory is coming in. And mid August to early Sept. for fall and winter issues. They usually need it in the can about 6 weeks ahead of the publishing date. For more high end magazines, it's done about 5 or 6 months in advance so you have to deal directly with the designers ... shortly after fashion week and long before the clothes hit the mall.

You also need to make sure of how they wish to be credited and make sure the magazine has perfect credits handed to them with the images, so that everyone is credited properly.

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