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09-04-2010
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Im not 100% sure if this has already been asked, but if it has please feel free to delete the post.

Is there a point of trying to start up modeling after 21?

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10-04-2010
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Not so much for fashion modeling ... because it takes a few years to develop a good portfolio and your skills and it's pretty much over at about 25.

There are exceptions, of course ... but statistically it's too old.

Commercial modeling is another thing ... doing ads and commercials for anything other than fashion ... like cars, detergent, insurance, etc. Commercial models can be any age, since they must look like average person .. depending on what the client needs to depict. Well ... they are never just average... commercial models are still better looking and more photogenic than an average person, but they must be able to come off as average, as we'd all like to be.

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10-04-2010
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Yes, to sign an contract with a motheragent at the age of 21 can be a hard job, but if you consider 2yrs development etc it could become impossible for you to sign with a NYC based agency. I know there are expetions like Iris Strubegger who started out at the age of 25, but all in all not such a good situation for fashion models. Even if you're signed abroad, it is not possible to build up a market for you.

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10-04-2010
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Ah thats very true. Thanks guys

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11-04-2010
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^it's still possible to work (successfully) as a fashion model, but most likely not in the major markets, i.e. New York, Paris, Milan.
If you have a commercial look, I would go for that. Much better m$ney.

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11-04-2010
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so two years of development is pretty normal?
i always wondered why very young girls (jac, for example) have been able to start so young, when there are all these beautiful girls her age that could easily do what she did. why do the agencies hold them back? is it better to start later?

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11-04-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsea View Post
so two years of development is pretty normal?
i always wondered why very young girls (jac, for example) have been able to start so young, when there are all these beautiful girls her age that could easily do what she did. why do the agencies hold them back? is it better to start later?
Studies, maturity, readiness to stay far from familly, skin problems... there are plenly of reasons which can make the progress of the girls around 15-17 years old more or less complicated.

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11-04-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsea View Post
so two years of development is pretty normal?
i always wondered why very young girls (jac, for example) have been able to start so young, when there are all these beautiful girls her age that could easily do what she did. why do the agencies hold them back? is it better to start later?
It's actually always different. There are girls like the Kenny sisters who walk for Prada and Burberry two months after starting out and there are girls like Iris Strubegger who need 5 years until they finally go aboard and do big things.

Problem nowadays is that agencies tend to avoid very young girls or girls who cannot model fulltime since they're still going to school.
School is CAREER KILLER NO 1. How many "school girls" have we seen who did exclusives for Calvin Klein or Prada etc and show never up again?
When you do those big things you have to turn fulltime, the earlier the better. Customers, Casting Directors (from Magazines), Photographers etc notice that you were in that show, they want to book/see you, and they don't want to be twice told "No sorry, xxxx is in school, she's not available".
If they're twice told that you're not available due to school, they don't want to hear from you again, and if you show up the very next season at the castings for fashion week and they hear you're still not modelling fulltime and see the same pictures in your book that they've already seen the season before, then they consider this "lack of new work" as "lack of improvement" and do not book you. You're only new in your first, and being "new" is always a good reason to be booked. But in your second season you're not new anymore. You're "out" when there didn't happen something like a development process in the meantime
This is always the same, and only in a very few cases (such as Jac and Garrn) it's different.

What happened to all these girls telling that it's "so easy to do modelling and school at the same time?" Hanna Rundlöf, Franziska Drude, Naty C, Auguste A.... This list could go on forever, but the possibility that you fail in this business because of "not beeing available due to school" is very high. I'm not an agent, but i know some girls from first hand who failed this way.

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11-04-2010
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thank you so much!
you answered the next question i was going to ask too...and wow, you proved an amazing point about school, so true.


Last edited by kelsea; 11-04-2010 at 01:50 PM.
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11-04-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsea View Post
so two years of development is pretty normal?
i always wondered why very young girls (jac, for example) have been able to start so young, when there are all these beautiful girls her age that could easily do what she did. why do the agencies hold them back? is it better to start later?
Starting young is a big risk, for the girl and for the agency. Starting at 12 (like Jac) is very problematic because the body is still changing a lot at that age. A girl could start a one year career.

Starting at 15 puts a girl's education at huge risk for the last two years of high school (if she has success she is expected to jump in full-time).

Starting after high school the girl is usually already fighting to stay slender, since the industry wants her to look like she did as a tall 12-year old. However at least then she is a bit less subject to what other people around her say, and a bit stronger about rejection. The only problem is that she is competing with the actual 12-15 year olds (who will have the same issues in a couple of years, unless they have a rare physique).

Development time can be very compressed if an agency is really pushing a girl.

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11-04-2010
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wow, so many good comments in this thread, you're all very helpfull !

my question would be, how decisive is the agency for a girl's career ?
i mean among the good ones, say next, supreme, frod + nymm, is there an actual 'difference' between them ? they all have their 'stars' so doesnt it rather depend on the model herself ?

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11-04-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cold_sun View Post

my question would be, how decisive is the agency for a girl's career ?
i mean among the good ones, say next, supreme, frod + nymm, is there an actual 'difference' between them ? they all have their 'stars' so doesnt it rather depend on the model herself ?
it of course mainly depends by the model herself, and...obviously of the client feedback that agencies can not always feel right (if it would be possible it would be an easy business...)
if on forums not knowing all details it is obviously more easy to blame the agencies, fact is that if u take new faces arriving in an agency like IMG, they actually have exactly the same management, the same tests, meeting with the same important clients...

if clients say no...it is very quickly over, and a change of agency will usually dont help much. If client say yes, but that the girl wants to go to school instead, it is not agency fault, if the girl needs to loose 2 centimeters but that in 6 months she makes no effort to loose it, it is not agency's fault too....

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11-04-2010
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it would be interesting to know which models (if any) sent pictures out the old-fashioned way and were rejected by the majority of the ny agencies, and then one took them on and they became a huge hit.

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11-04-2010
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Lindsay Wixson

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11-04-2010
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wasn't that because of steven meisel though?

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