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08-08-2007
  61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BetteT View Post
Reetaree,



You haven't said what your duties would be in this entry level position, but I'm guessing that they are not going to need your styling eye in the beginning ... that is more likely to be clerical, answering phones or assisting someone with grunt work, is it not?

So, I would not say to seriously consider whether or not you should show your book on this job interview and here is why:

I've hired people both as assistants to me and in the business world and I know that I'm always looking for someone who is interested in doing the work at hand, first and foremost. I do like when an applicant has long term goals, but if I were hiring for a 9 to 5 job and I thought that the applicant was building their portfolio to become a freelance stylist, I'd be worried that they'd be taking time off when a paid gig came up or to test for their portfolio ... giving the styling a higher priority over working for me. I'd be more inclined to hire someone who says they have the goals but need to learn more about the business first. A portfolio tells me that the person is actively working towards not working for me. Not sure if your interviewer would feel the same way or not ... I guess it might depend on the job you are interviewing for and how flexible they are about absences.
i agree with this completely..
you could do yourself more harm than good this way...
if you are interviewing to be an asst in the accessories dept...
they don't want to see a styling book...
it means that you don't really want to do market and will not be as dedicated as someone who does...

be careful...

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08-08-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reetaree View Post
Thanks BetteT and thank you also Softgrey and LESider for all your feedback and comments.

I will definitely consider everything you've mentioned Bette. As far as my book is concerned-the actual building process of it is really motivating for me and it just goes to show what progress I've made so far.

What then does one actually do once they've got a book? Do we call up agencies and magazines and ask to be represented and/or to work with them?
Youi have come a long way ... but you still have a long way to go. But I'm proud of you ... you seem to have the guts to keep on doing what you must do to make it.

Who should see your portfolio? Here's some ideas if you wish to work as a freelance stylist (most of us do not have regular jobs in th industry):

Most agencies who rep stylists won't be interested in representing you until you have some impressive tears and some good paid shoots under your belt and maybe a regular clientelle ... it may take years and years. At least that is what I've been told by agents and stylists/artists that are repped. I am not ... I find my own gigs.

But what you can do is go into artist/stylist agencies and ask to be placed on the assistant's list. Occassionally, their working stylists may have need for another assistant and you might pick up a few gigs like that. Won't pay much more thatn $150 a day, but it's work and you';; be able to observe a senior (key)stylist at work .. a very valuable learning tool. And if you are liked by their stylists, eventually you may pick up extra business that they stylists have to turn down ... and eventually you might work your way into having tha agency rep you too, when you have enough experience.

You may also seek out to assist other stylists on your own ... either freelance or an a regular basis.

You can show it to good working photographers who might use a stylist from time to time and see if they will place you on their list of stylists they like. Photographers often do the hiring of stylists for things like catalog shoots, ad shoots, etc.

You can approach photographers who shoot for local magazines ... often they bring in their own team. Usually not paid or pay no more than $150 for the whole gig ... but you may get tears for your portfolio ... very important.

Start with approaching smaller local magazines who have some fashion layouts and see if they need a stylist or if they can refer you to their fashion photographers (get names and numbers, if possible).

Seek out art directors/producers at small production companies or commercial photography studios who do fashion shoots for clients.

Approach owners of small retail shops/ web sites/ designers who are based in your city and see if they have an interest in hiring a stylist for their catalog/ad shoots.

If any of these people say that all of that is arranged through someone else, a photographer, a production company, get names and numbers and approach them.

If any of these people express any interest, ask to meet with them to show them your porfolio. Remember, it's like applying for a job ... only you do it all the time ... you must continuously do this to find clients. It's a lifelong process for most of us. And probably the hardest thing we must do.

And when you network with other people in the industry ... make sure that the makeup artist and hair artists that you work with on shoots have your comp card ( a leave behind or mailing postcard with a few of your best images and your contact information and web site) or business card. Also the photographer's assistant ... he is usually a photographer in his own right, the models ... everyone at the shoot. Always carry your portfolio to shoots, industry events (at least have it in your car) ... you never know who might ask to see it.

Oh and ask people that you respect in the industry to critique your book ... to learn how to make it better, what to take out, what it still needs. A portfolio is never "finished" ... it's an ongoing record of your growth at a stylist (or photographer or makeup/hair artist, whatever is applicable). The better it is, the better you look.

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Last edited by BetteT; 08-08-2007 at 03:46 PM.
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12-08-2007
  63
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thanks to bette,soft and other to great input about this matter....i have one question...is it possible to make a book with magazine tearsheet only?..or its mandatory to use prints and in the end the magazine pages....

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18-08-2007
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Nothing is mandatory. A mixture is customary. But consider that you want to show off your work with the best possible shots.

Here's some food for thought:

Usually the quality of tearsheets are not nearly as good as prints. And unless it's a really high end fashion magazine, you might not be getting really great images, anyway. You won't get to choose ... the magazine chooses so the best shots to show off your work are often not published. Then, many times, the very best creative shots you have are tests. So most people have a mixture ... their best tears and their best test shots/stories. Only the best of both should be used ... and the rest ... if they aren't up to par, need to be set aside.

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09-11-2007
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The following is a copy of a post I made in the "How to become a Fashion Stylist" thread, but I thought it was applicable here, too. I was answering a question about whether or not to use tears from a slightly "t&a" publication and the issue of using tears/images from shoot you assist on came up, too.
Quote:
One of the hardest things to do it to determine what belongs in your portfolio. And there are things that can hurt you if they are in there. Resist the temptation to use something just because its a tear ... you must decide if it will help or hurt you. Here's a few thoughts on the matter.

First you must decide what market you want to work in. If you are aiming to work in "glamour" (Maxim style shoots) and possible music videos (rap/hip hop in particular) then the "not so artistic t&a" shots/tears will probably help you ... do some research about that end of the industry to find out what is the norm. However, if you aspire to work in the commercial world of advertising and catalogs, then they should be left out. If you are OK working in both markets, then you might consider having 2 portfolios, each geared to the appropriate market. Keep them separate.

It's better to have really great tests in your book ... ones that actually show the prospective client that you can do the style and high quality of work that they are looking for ... than to have a bunch of half a**ed tears.

Secondly ... and you may not have thought of this:

You really should not be using any images in your book where you assisted. It is looked upon in the industry as almost "stealing" credit for someone else's work. Even if you were given permission ... and you MUST ask for permission every time ... it's still not to your advantage. As an assistant, you are not the creative force behind the images ... therefore it is not your styling ... it's what the Key created. Having those pics in your book says to everyone that you are saying that you styled them ... when you did not. A dishonest reputation is definltley not something that you want for yourself.

The only exception I can think of, is if the Key Stylist had you do a look entirely on your own, from colaboration and conception, sourcing, and to dressing the model without direction or input. Then you could honestly put that in your book and say it was your work. But that probably won't happen ... not likely that a Key Stylist will give up control, especially on paid gig or an editorial with their reputation on the line.

What you do about assisting, is place that shoot on your resume as "assistant to Joe Blow" and use that Key Stylist as a reference (ask first, of course).

Make your portfolio full of your own work ... and all tests are fine until you get really good tears for the market you are wanting to work in.

Remember though ... you are judged by your worst image ... so be ruthless and get rid of everything that is not on of your absolute best images. And remember too ... that they look at and judge the entire image, not just your part ... so be sure it's a great image all the way around ... photography, model, hair/makeup and styling.

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09-11-2007
  66
windowshopping
 
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Thanks again!

Sound advice If I continue shooting with this publication or others like it, I will probably end up building a second book. It's not my ideal market, but something I don't mind doing when work is slow.

Good to know a book full of tests is okay. Editing them down to the very best is key, I agree!


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10-05-2008
  67
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let me begin my questions by stating I am coming from a stylist p-o-v

For example, if I am using some amazing clothes but in the end a lot of the photos get cropped so that some of the best part of the clothing is hidden, would it be wise to set the tears aside, and instead use prints of the shots from the shoot that best show off my work(even if it is not what appears in the magazine)?

This would also mean requesting some extra photos & permission from the photographer directly. Is this just taboo? I feel that some of the shots a photographer chooses is based solely on composition, and my heart sinks when I see what is chosen for submission and my favorite pieces can hardly be seen.

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10-05-2008
  68
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Is there any post similar to this but for designers?

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10-05-2008
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Can anybody explain me what is necessary to put in an aspiring designer portfolio?

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11-05-2008
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Creative ... there another thread for designer's portfolios. They are soooo different that this thread is not applicable for your needs. Here's the thread ... it's old but has good info in it. Ask your questions there and it should probably spark a new conversation.

Mishahoi ... rule of thumb ... the strongest image is the best one for your portfolio, whether or not it shows everything you did (the styling) and wheterh or not it is the actual tear. People don't judge the styling or the makeup alone ... they judge the entire picture. So if it's great but only shows part of your work ... it's OK. Better a strong image showing part of your work than a so-so one that shows every detail. It's still a great picture and it means that you worked with a great team ... and that alone, says more about you than the clothes. Ive heard this over and over again from seasoned pros and I strongly agree. You are judged by the entire picture ... so make it the best picture from the shoot.

It's not taboo to ask the photographer for some other images for your portfolio ... but he could ask you to pay for them. More often than not, he'll just give you a disc.

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Last edited by BetteT; 11-05-2008 at 08:18 PM.
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13-05-2008
  71
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Thank you Bette--
I was very curious if it was something not even heard of in the industry.

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29-07-2008
  72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LESider View Post
House of Portfolios on 21 street, same as Brewer Cantelmo but quite a bit cheaper. Talk to them and see what you can come up with.

I got tired of the basic books had a girlfriend who used to teach bookbinding teach me how to make portfolios. $30 dollars in supplies and I now have photo editors commenting how nice my book matches my photography.

Ever consider doing a tutorial?
:p

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29-07-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mishahoi View Post
let me begin my questions by stating I am coming from a stylist p-o-v

For example, if I am using some amazing clothes but in the end a lot of the photos get cropped so that some of the best part of the clothing is hidden, would it be wise to set the tears aside, and instead use prints of the shots from the shoot that best show off my work(even if it is not what appears in the magazine)?

This would also mean requesting some extra photos & permission from the photographer directly. Is this just taboo? I feel that some of the shots a photographer chooses is based solely on composition, and my heart sinks when I see what is chosen for submission and my favorite pieces can hardly be seen.

Don't set aside tears. Being published is what's important.

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29-07-2008
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I'm curious to see how it looks when the portfolio book matches the photography inside ^^

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01-08-2008
  75
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I'm a stylist putting together my first portfolio. I have a number of amazing creatives lined up that I am directing and I happen to be lucky enough to have gotten an amazing, experienced team together for each and every one of them.

I wrapped up a shoot that I was directing as well as styling yesterday. I had an amazing internationally known model on board and a photographer who shoots for today's top fashion magazines such as Elle. How did I manage to put this dream team together without a book? I presented a strong visual concept and got the both of them on board.

Here's where things got difficult...

The shoot was taking place on the rooftop of a city high rise building. We shot at sunset up until the night with an amazing view of the city skyscrapers and the clouds at sunset gave for an amazing shoot all together. White, Black, and Yellow. My style is very simplistic. I think less is more. Very minimalist and abstract when playing with color. This, I think, is what makes my style unique. Of course, not all of my shoots reflect this perception that I have because I want to be able to show that I have range. I feel this is very important.

This shoot in particular was my second shoot as a stylist/creative director putting a book together. I chose to keep accessories to the bare minimum. In my opinion, the view did us justice and adding accessories to our already colorful outfits would have made things look messy. The photographer, on the other hand, didn't agree. He wasn't thrilled about my lack of accessories but he grew to appreciate it a little bit more once he saw the shots. He was actually giddy by the end of the shoot as he was so impressed with the shots - I wouldn't be confident in saying that it had to do with my work as a stylist because our model was just wonderful and could make ANYTHING look good. But would I be selfish in taking the credit that I am due for the beauty of these shots? I mean, I DID style it - had I not, she'd be naked. Secondly, I DID direct it - putting the entire thing together from scratch and choosing the right colors for the rich Indigo/purple sky at sunset - not to mention, choosing the location and timing of the shoot for the perfect shots.

The photographer, when he first saw wardrobe, said that the point of a stylist book was to see how well they could throw things together like mixing it up with the accessories. Now, I don't necessarily agree. I think a stylist's CHOICE of wardrobe for the model based on the setting/story - accessories or not - says a lot about them... but am I wrong? I mean, he is the expert. He mentioned that a person can look at a model in a few pieces and go "okay... I love those pieces.. but where's the styling?"

That has been PLAYING with my mind since the shoot - is this true? If I have ONE piece in a shot, and I absolutely love that shot, even though its soley the one piece, should I exclude this from my book because I failed to accessorize? I mean, does the fact that I CHOSE that one piece out of all the pieces in the world for that particular shot mean absolutely nothing?


Please help. I need some reassurance - BUT ONLY IF IT'S TRUE - I need honest, valid opinions in order to grow. His advice was as honest and valid as it gets, but my views as a stylist conflict with his opinion of one and the fact that I am not as experienced as he is pushes me to forget what I believe and run with his advice.

What does everyone else think?!

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