What does Brexit mean for fashion in the UK? (Read Post #1, before posting) - Page 2 - the Fashion Spot
 
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28-06-2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benn98 View Post
So I agree with Mulletproof in a way. I thought it was a disgusting thing to say
😳 ..

I was trying to be optimistic!

But yeah 2003 will go down as one of my favorite years in fashion haha, everyone was so angry about the invasion and a lot of the imagery produced then reflects that.

weren't you against the remain campaigners or just not feeling wolfgang tillmans? are you a.. regrexiter? lol

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28-06-2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MulletProof View Post
😳 ..

I was trying to be optimistic!

But yeah 2003 will go down as one of my favorite years in fashion haha, everyone was so angry about the invasion and a lot of the imagery produced then reflects that.

weren't you against the remain campaigners or just not feeling wolfgang tillmans? are you a.. regrexiter? lol
Golly, thanks for the proverbial scarlet letter you've just painted on my chest! And in Caps! Lol.

I'm against the employ of art as a tool for political means. As a result I almost always regard the pairing of art and politics with the utmost suspicion. There's a huge difference between making a statement and coercion, imo. The moment you cannot tell said difference it becomes a bit shaky. Tillmans on the other hand steamed ahead and blatantly courted, which I thought was a bit unfair. Little did I know clutching my pearls would be of no consequence.

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28-06-2016
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Well you can look at it as coercion, but it can also be creating awareness and filling up the void of a weakened education system and media outlets... I think art could do more in terms of social commentary, be less selfish, more responsible and involved, and inclusive too, same for entertainment... I find it sad that we live in a world where some people act as if they could abstain from any social responsibility, especially a huge one such as the economic and political direction of a country... they are fine using a huge public platform to tell us personal things like how our relationships should be, how our butt and hair should look, strange ways to advance in life and be successful, what they don't like about pop culture, but god forbid they come to terms with their presence as public citizens and use that same outlet for the sacred things I just mentioned for something so low and dirty and uncalled for such as options for the economic system and its effects.

I don't think any of these fields help that much anyway lol.. when you look at these maps and where fear is more prevalent, it's clear you actually have to detach from any notion of urban privilege (social media included) and go 1930s style, door by door, breaking s*it down.. but by the time you try, it's usually too late..

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28-06-2016
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I’ll have to remind myself to bite my tongue since the political and social ramifications of only a less-than-52%-win is sure to rile up some discontent in the aftermath is something that’s not welcomed in this discussion…

But on a purely creative, high fashion aspect— I agree with Mullet that such a political development will surely be the motivation for creative inspirations for a new wave of designers … There’s is so much complexity, richness and history to British fashion, and the best of their architects are always such interesting provocateurs to boot. And to be frank, the current offering is hardly living up to its predecessors of the likes of Viv, Galliano and McQueen— all of whom had always been political at some time, in their fashion presentations— and I always think British high fashion is at its best when it has a political message. Maybe this historical development will be the catalyst for the new guard of visionaries. It’s such a shame that it may take an independent Britain to instigate a new wave in high fashion to excite us fashion addicts— something that I would conclude is not even in the periphery of the average English citizen right now.

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28-06-2016
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What does it matter. I think its time the Europeans got over the fact they are no longer the center of the world re: fashion. Asian markets and indeed the American (North and South), with the growing Middle East, Sub Continent and Pacific markets are so much more worthy of Britain's interests now more than ever as far as fashion is concerned. Even here in tiny little Australia we have conceded that Asia is far more important to us than Europe.

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04-08-2016
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Quote:
Britain Now World's Cheapest Luxury Market

By Limei Hoang
August 3, 2016 12:49

The UK is now the cheapest luxury goods market in the world in the wake of the country's vote to leave the EU, which pushed down the value of the British pound about 10 percent against the euro.

LONDON, United Kingdom — In the wake of Britain's vote to leave the EU, which pushed down the value of the pound about 10 percent against the euro, the country has become the cheapest luxury goods market in the world, helping to buoy British luxury labels, at least in the short term, according to new research by Luca Solca, the head of luxury goods at Exane BNP Paribas.

"The Brexit vote has made the UK the cheapest market in the world for luxury goods,” Solca told BoF. “A weak British pound will boost travel inflows to the UK, helping British luxury goods players like Burberry, Mulberry and Jimmy Choo."

While luxury goods companies are not expected to raise prices in the UK in the coming months — at least until there is more clarity around exactly when and how the country might exit the EU — Britain should see a boost from tourist inflows and spending due to its weakened currency. That, coupled with recent terror attacks in France, which have slowed tourist flows to the country, could result in a tourist spending boom in the UK.

Luxury goods sold in Europe are amongst the cheapest in the world, costing less than in the US and significantly less than in Asia, where luxury goods are most expensive. Indeed, on the company's UK website, a classic Burberry trench coat retails at £1,495 or about $1,995 at current exchange. In China, the same coat is priced 32 percent higher at ¥17,500.00 or about $2,639.

Exane BNP Paribas estimates that travellers account for about 50 percent of global luxury goods sales and fluctuating exchange rates — particularly a weak pound and euro — have made the pricing differences between some regions even more pronounced, helping to fuel tourist spend amongst bargain-seeking consumers. Importantly, some consumers also see emotional value in shopping away from home, preferring to buy luxury goods in destination cities like London, Paris and New York to add cache to their purchases.

It's not surprising that increased tourism and lower prices in the UK will boost British luxury brands like Burberry, Mulberry and Jimmy Choo, which have higher store counts in the country. Four and a half percent of Burberry's total retail network, measured by number of stores, is located in Britain, including its largest flagships, so the company should experience a significant tailwind, especially as it report its profits in pounds. Likewise, Mulberry and Jimmy Choo, which are dependent on the UK market, should also see a boost.

However, smaller brands like Kering’s Stella McCartney and Prada’s Church’s, which also have a high exposure to the UK, are unlikely to see any material boost to the profits of their respective owners, who would be negatively impacted by currency exchange losses. Hugo Boss, which has 6 percent of its stores in the UK, could stand to benefit from organic growth. However, this could be offset by currency translations.
Source: https://www.businessoffashion.com/ar...20aa-417355313

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