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17-01-2009
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Haydée Politoff
I'm surprised there isn't a thread dedicated to the french beauty Haydée Politoff. She played the darling ingenue in Eric Rohmer's exquisite 1967 film La Collectionneuse.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75JH3UbW1H8


youtube.com


Last edited by French Cruller; 17-01-2009 at 04:45 PM.
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18-01-2009
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amazon


Last edited by French Cruller; 18-01-2009 at 03:40 PM.
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26-05-2010
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There is something of the young Molly Ringwald in this picture, the pouty look, not insolent, but not overtly sexy either. A kind of "I'm still searching for my identity look". Has this style of actress gone out of style ?

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18-03-2011
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Saw this great film again last night, and thought to resurrect this thread of the uber-adorable Haydee Politoff.

PS: love the Molly Ringwald reference, Jeanne!



























source: flickr

source: flickr


Last edited by French Cruller; 18-03-2011 at 09:14 PM.
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20-03-2011
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I was a teenager when she became famous and she was an ideal model, with her ironic look, her easy , unproblematic sensuality, the transgressing that made her a little dangerous, but not too much. Her short hair helped (as with Catherine Jourdan, who recently died), give her that "this is all about me" look. Very far from the goddess looks or overt sexuality of a Brigitte Bardot, or "butter would not melt in my mouth" Catherine Deneuve look. Not "village", kind of her "own space" look, created by her. That was the attraction of Maria Schneider as well. There were many actresses like that in the sixties, early seventies. Most didn't make it to stardom, enduring stardom at least, of course. Thanks for following up on the thread, French Cruller.

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24-03-2011
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Wow, Jeanne, are you a writer? I love the way you word things! I'm green with envy that you grew up in a time with such beautifully real role models. It's a far cry from the contrived starlets today with their PR reps, personal assistants, stylist and hairdressers, plastic surgeons, and... yuck!


PS: Maria Schneider is favorite of mine as well!

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27-03-2011
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Thanks for the compliment, French Cruller, although I feel it is undeserved, certainly for the post you refer to. When I reread it, I had a little trouble understanding exactly what I had been trying to say!
The pictures you posted are very evocative, and they are the kind of pictures of women I would like to be able to take. The play with mirrors, (Bergman’s Persona revisited, minus the drama), the interplay between his eyes and her eyes, the nonchalant positions she assumes, the slight bow of her head, the bangs just about to conceal her half-closed eyes, (The Breakfast Club 15 years ahead or so), the delicately sculpted profile, with her perfect nose, chin, and ears (sassy short hair in place of the eyes), the body parts ( a wink to Godard’s deconstruction of Bardot in Le Mépris, “Do you like my legs?”, “And my thighs, do you like my thighs?”, on a shapely girl’s body on the sand, not on a goddess’s figure on a bed), and always that distant, inward-looking look, as if she didn’t care whether she was being photographed or not. It is a far cry from the narcissistic pictures of today’s starlets (I blame the photographers and editorial orders), where even a far-away gaze seems artificial and overdone. Haydée here could be an exceptionally beautiful friend who posed for your camera while you were on vacation together. No fuss, no big deal.
Yes, I believe that the sixties and early seventies were an extraordinary time for young avant-gardiste actresses, directed by photographers and directors tired of a limited repertoire and avid to draw on a younger woman’s new kind of seductive power, playing with fluid shapes as it were, like the dreamy ones computer graphics compose for you. I am addicted to the series Madmen, which makes that transitional era so fascinating. Nor more dichotomy between the Marilyn (Ava, Elizabeth, Sophia), and the Jackie (Grace, Audrey) types. The women, raised in a climate of new assertiveness, are thinking and dreaming about who they really are, not just how they are perceived by men, or want to be perceived. They are in a madly creative stage of reshaping themselves while not discarding their femininity, just reevaluating it and taking control of it. And they work as a team with their creative directors.

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