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13-03-2006
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I see her as a Anna Piaggi type figure - another fashion patron except with less editorial work behind her.

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18-03-2006
  17
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her hats are crazy..... almost tacky....

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18-03-2006
  18
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this woman is in desperate need of a stylist ...

imo...

........................................... .......

i don't know whether to laugh or cry...
i feel rather sorry for her...


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19-03-2006
  19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuGaR_rUsH
Poor people who have to sit behind her at fashion shows.
thats *exactly* what i was thinking... if it were me, i know i wouldn't be pleased in the least!!

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19-03-2006
  20
windowshopping
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuGaR_rUsH
Poor people who have to sit behind her at fashion shows.
I was thinking the same thing as soon as I looked at those photos. Imagine seeing her walking up and sitting infront of you. My heart would sink. lol

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06-04-2006
  21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by susie_bubble
I see her as a Anna Piaggi type figure - another fashion patron except with less editorial work behind her.
I agree, as they both share a similar penchant for kooky hats (although hers are from Phillip Treacy)..

Dont know much else about her, except she was a very key figure in introducing Alexander McQueen to the masses..(I think she was even the one who persuaded McQueen to use Alexander instead of Lee)..

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30-04-2006
  22
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She's got a bit part in The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. Look for the spiky white hat.

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07-05-2007
  23
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from asw.com
Isabella Blow (née Isabella Delves Broughton), 19 November 1958—May 7, 2007 has died in London, reportedly of cancer. A British magazine editor and international style icon (also described by some as a great British eccentric), she was the muse of hat designer Philip Treacy and was credited with discovering models Stella Tennant and Sophie Dahl. She cultivated an extraordinary personal style that verged on fiercely intimidating - but she was a huge supporter of young designers and adored by many for her passion for fashion.

A daughter of Sir Evelyn Delves Broughton (who blew much of the family fortune and left her little of his estate), Blow recalls as a child her fondest memory "trying on my mother's pink hat ... there's a photo of me in it as a child and I look as happy as anything to be wearing it."

Blow lived in New York in 1979 when she studied Ancient Chinese Art at Columbia University and shared a flat with the actress Catherine Oxenberg. A year later she moved to Texas and worked for Guy Laroche and subsequently she worked for Anna Wintour and Andre Leon Talley at Vogue. In the late 1980s, she befriended Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat - aside from the avant-garde lifestyle, she was a serious talent herself.

In 1986, she returned to London and worked for Michael Roberts, then Fashion Director of Tatler and the Sunday Times Style magazine. Blow has a natural sense of style and has a good feeling for future directions. She purchased Alexander McQueen's entire graduate collection.

Blow was the fashion director of Tatler and consulted for a number of companies. In 2002, she was the subject of an exhibiton entitled When Philip met Isabella, featuring sketches and photographs of her wearing his hat designs. In 2005 she starred in a project by artist Matthieu Laurette commissioned and produced by Frieze Projects 2005 entitled "What Do They Wear at Frieze Art Fair?" consisting of daily guided tours of Frieze Art Fair led by Blow and fellow international fashion experts Peter Saville, Kira Joliffe, Bay Garnett. She was married to the art dealer Detmar Blow.

Rest in Peace (wearing a great hat)...

One must always wear a hat when lunching with people whom one does not know well. One appears to one's best advantage. - Coco Chanel

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07-05-2007
  24
Meg
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There is an RIP thread Bette . Let's keep this purely for her work and all condolences in that thread.

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07-05-2007
  25
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OK ... done.

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08-05-2007
  26
etre soi-meme
 
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i'm in total shock..

fashion world can be a very sad place, even when you are a real star like Isa was.. i have no words, very depressing news

posting this here since it has lots of detals regarding her exceptional career...
Quote:
Isabella Blow, stylist, designer muse and former fashion director of Tatler and London's Sunday Times, died Sunday night. She was 48.

Blow's husband, Detmar, is said to have told people that she died peacefully in her sleep. Blow was recently diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer and underwent surgery about two weeks ago. She was recovering at her home in the English countryside. The exact cause of death could not be learned.

London-born Blow was one of the few remaining fashion eccentrics. Not a classic beauty, she more than made up for it with her outlandish getups. She regularly showed up in the front rows of runway shows and fashion events in a wild designer ensemble, which she would top with a Philip Treacy hat, from a giant lobster to an elaborately carved boat.

A staunch supporter of emerging talents, Blow was credited with discovering Alexander McQueen and Treacy, and models Stella Tennant and Sophie Dahl.

"She had one very unusual quality in the fashion world — she had a heart," Treacy said on Monday. "She was often misunderstood as a crazy woman with a hat on. But she wasn't. She was intelligent, cultivated, interesting. Her defiance and her unusual perspective on everything was an inspiration to designers and creative people. She had a belief in you as an individual. Whether you were Alexander McQueen, Sophie Dahl, Stella Tennant or me. That belief was incredibly inspiring to young designers.

"She had been up and down recently. Everyone loved her and was hoping that everything was going to be OK," he added.

At stages of her career, Blow worked in the fashion departments of American Vogue, British Vogue, Tatler and London's Sunday Times Style supplement.

In recent years, her star had dimmed slightly, and it was known in industry circles that she suffered from severe depression. Last June, Blow was hospitalized in London after a fall and was said to have been seriously injured.

Michael Roberts, Vanity Fair's fashion director, hired Blow as an assistant in the mid-Eighties, when he was running the fashion department at Tatler magazine.

"She was just great from the get-go," he recalled. "To me, she was in the long line of English eccentrics, like Edith Sitwell and Ottoline Morrell. She was marvelous because she comes from that amazing 'White Mischief' background. At Tatler, all her amazing dotty friends were perfect fodder for the magazine."
Roberts recalled how, more recently, Blow seemed to be increasingly unhappy.

"She had major feelings of persecution and that led to depression," he said. "She felt very let down by a lot of people in the fashion community, especially the ones that she had championed for so many years. She felt that when they rose in the fashion firmament and got the big bucks, she always seemed to lose out. That can be depressing.

"When it came to fashion, she was fearless, but when it came to her personal life, she was full of fear," Roberts added.

Rifat Ozbek had also known her since those assistant days at Tatler. "She was an inspiration," Ozbek said. "I was at her wedding, wearing all white from my collection, and she said to me, 'Even the bride didn't wear white, but you did.' She wore a beautiful purple velvet encrusted gown made by Nadia la Valle, which was very medieval, and Philip Treacy did the most beautiful gold lace crown. I can't believe I will never see her again."

Hamish Bowles, Vogue's European editor at large, said Blow was "the most incredible discoverer and encourager of talent. She was absolutely an inspiration, not just in the abstract sense of looking so extraordinary and breathtaking, and putting together things in such an unexpected way, but also in opening designers' eyes to historical references. She was someone who consumed fashion at its rawest extreme."

Daphne Guinness, a friend, said, "An enormous light has gone out of our lives and out of the world. She was hugely influential, and had such an enthusiasm for life and for new talent. She was a catalyst for so many moments, so many careers."

Katie Grand, fashion stylist and editor of Pop magazine, said Blow was one of her favorite people to sit next to at a fashion show. "She was always so funny," Grand said. "She was a great friend to me when I was finding my feet in the fashion business. She was warm, loving and incredibly good fun. She was a gorgeous person."

Karla Otto, a friend and owner of her namesake public relations firm, called Blow "a true eccentric. She walked into a room and filled the room, not just because of what she was wearing, but because of her incredibly strong aura. She was an extremely special person and precious friend, she said.
At the time of her death, Blow was working with Treacy on the exhibition "When Philip Met Isabella," which is to open in St. Petersburg this month.
areticle and photo credited at wwd.com

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08-05-2007
  27
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Please post condolances and rememberances in this thread.

Posts of that nature that are posted here, will be moved. Thank you for your cooperation.

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08-05-2007
  28
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An FTV podcast was released all about her today, pity it didn't mention her death in anything but the title.

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10-05-2007
  29
far from home...
 
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nytimes

Quote:
May 10, 2007
Tribute
The Woman No Hat Could Tame


Bill Cunningham/The New York Times

NOT FADE AWAY Isabella Blow stopped traffic with her outrageous getups. She was a friend to many in the fashion world, including the milliner Philip Treacy, right, and Hedi Slimane, at left.

By CATHY HORYN

ISABELLA BLOW, the English eccentric and sorcerer of talent who died this week, was a completely implausible figure. You could not explain her and you could not reason with her. She was incredibly bright on the subject of fashion and rarefied tastes, a fact she wore on her sleeve and on her head. She loved a bustle, a corseted waist and a spectacular hat. And not for her the mushy-pea variety, the Ascot bonnet.

Her hats were the big-game kind, trophies of her wit and imagination: a veiled set of antlers, a jewel-encrusted lobster, a sailing ship, a pheasant. Her more exotic choices of headgear could be attributed to an aesthetic link with her paternal grandmother, Lady Vera Delves Broughton, an explorer and hunter, who claimed to have supped on a tribesman in Papua New Guinea. “She wasn’t strictly a cannibal,” her granddaughter pointed out.

But try to remind Izzy, as she was called, during one of her periodic financial crises that even aristocratic eccentrics had to occasionally go out and earn a living, and she would laugh her deep honking laugh and say, “Oh, honey...”

Although Izzy worked regularly as a fashion editor, at different times for British Vogue, The Sunday Times and Tatler, and intermittently as a consultant to companies like Swarovski, she had, in a sense, no clear role. And that was a problem for her.

“Nobody knew how to quantify her talent,” said her friend Daphne Guinness, whose great-grandfather knew Ms. Blow’s grandmother. She was definitely the catalyst to the designer Alexander McQueen and the milliner Philip Treacy, her all-consuming belief in their talent that of a patron. Though, as Ms. Guinness said: “She could ill afford to be that. People took it for granted that because she came from a certain type of background she had money. She didn’t have that kind of support, though she could spend her last penny helping someone.”

Michael Roberts, the fashion director of Vanity Fair, took on Ms. Blow as his assistant at Tatler in the mid-1980s and remained close to her until the last months of her life. Recalling her discovery of Mr. McQueen, in the early ’90s, Mr. Roberts said: “She rang me up and said, ‘You’ve got to see this guy’s clothing.’ Then she dragged me off to a basement in Piccadilly, a smelly basement. But she was absolutely right.”

In both appearance and expectations she belonged very much, one felt, to a different time. “She was the most interesting person I ever met,” Mr. Treacy said this week in The Guardian. Though English newspapers and magazines typically have small budgets, Ms. Blow invariably stayed at the most expensive hotels. “She went over budget because she didn’t have any conception of budget,” said Jonathan Newhouse, who oversees the Condé Nast magazines in Europe and Asia.

As Ms. Guinness said, “She had that kind of extravagant, ’30s idea of money.” She traveled with numerous pieces of luggage, including hatboxes. Recalling a trip they made together to Kuwait for a photo shoot, Ms. Guinness said: “We were in Terminal 4 at Heathrow. I’m not someone who fades into the background, either, but Izzy looked like a highwayman.” She had on a cape and tricorn.

Although Ms. Blow was an exceptionally cultivated woman, at ease with a baroness or a shopgirl, she advanced toward things with a kind of willful cluelessness. In Kuwait, oblivious of Islamic laws, she put models in bikinis. “Suddenly people came out of nowhere with guns at us,” Ms. Guinness said. “She was so nonplussed.”

For a cameo appearance in Wes Anderson’s “Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou,” she fretted, according to her friend Ronnie Newhouse, that she would be nervous and asked one of the actors if he had ever “done this kind of thing before.” It was Bill Murray.

But it was difficult for Ms. Blow to find a home in a world she influenced. She was upset that Mr. McQueen didn’t take her along when he sold his brand to Gucci, though they remained good friends. “She functioned outside the corporate world,” Ms. Guinness said. “Once the deals started happening, she fell by the wayside. Everybody else got contracts, and she got a free dress.”

It may be that she didn’t know how to ask for a position, Ms. Guinness said. “But getting that kind of acknowledgment would have given her esteem. She poured all of that esteem into other people, but had none of her own.”

In the last year, Ms. Blow suffered from serious depression, attempting suicide at least twice, according to her friends. Last May she jumped from a highway overpass, breaking both legs. She remained, in a sense, valiantly Izzy, pointing out to her friends that she had been dressed to the nines, and in her hospital room smoking inside a cupboard, “as if somebody wouldn’t notice it,” Ms. Guinness said.

While the Newhouses took care of many of her medical bills, and her friends did what they could do to help her, she became more and more remote, convinced that she would end up as a bag lady. Nothing could make her see the beauty in things the way she once had, turning the fashion world on its ear.



Z. Tomaszewski/Wenn/Newscom



J. Almasi/Uppa-Zuma Press/Newscom



Bill Cunningham/The New York Times
Her party headgear included an octopus hat, with a lobster necklace.




Z. Tomaszewski/Wenn/Newscom
A horned creation for a do at Madame Tussaud’s in London.




Bill Cunningham/The New York Times

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10-05-2007
  30
chaos reigns
 
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Hum ... I see a museum making a retrospectif on her soon

-well shed totally deserve one a la Anna Piaggi exhibit-

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