How to Join
the Fashion Spot / All Things Vintage / Icons From The Past
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
29-09-2009
  76
V.I.P.
 
nmyngan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,148


moviegoods

  Reply With Quote
 
29-09-2009
  77
V.I.P.
 
nmyngan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,148

ebay

  Reply With Quote
10-10-2009
  78
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,206
She's got a show on UK TV next week - "Joan Does Glamour" on ITV1, Tuesday October 13, 9pm - as she looks back on her life (dailymail.co.uk):

Quote:
How to be glamorous (like moi!) by Joan Collins

10th October 2009

Never will I forget walking into the cafeteria on the Fox studio lot in Los Angeles for lunch one day wearing blue jeans, a T-shirt and - believe it or not! - not a scrap of make-up.

It was 1955 and I had just been cast in my first Hollywood movie, The Girl In The Red Velvet Swing. The part had been intended for Marilyn Monroe, but she walked out of Fox and the role fell to me.

Aged 21, I - a young British actress - was to play the most beautiful girl in New York. As I walked through the cafe towards Richard Fleischer, the director of the movie, he saw me and he threw his hands in the air.

'Oh my God,' he said. 'I can't look at you. You look so hideous. You should always appear in public with full make-up, a nice dress and white gloves, otherwise you'll never get anywhere in this business.'

I must admit I was shocked. But when I was chatting to my girlfriends later, they told me that I did look a bit scruffy. Then Hedda Hopper, the leading gossip columnist of the day, wrote that 'Joan Collins looks like she combs her hair with an egg-beater', and I knew I had to do something.

That's when I decided that perhaps I'd better start smartening up my act. The thing is, you see, that no one is born glamorous, but anyone can acquire glamour.

But what is glamour? The clothes are important, of course. But, in the end, it isn't down to low-cut dresses and sequins and feather boas. It's to do with aura, with grooming, with self-possession - and with a touch of mystique.

I was lucky enough to have been a pretty baby, with lots of dark hair and big eyes, so I suppose I did look quite cute. When I was six months old, my mother put a sign on my pram which read: 'Please do not kiss me.'

I was 'discovered' while studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and was soon in demand as a photographic model. When I was 17, the Photographers' Association voted me the Most Beautiful Girl In Britain, something that amazed my father when he found out. Not terribly supportive!

In 1950, I was signed to the British film studio Rank and I played a succession of juvenile delinquents and hookers, none of them in the least glamorous.

The thing is, you see, that no one is born glamorous, but anyone can acquire glamour

But I would glam up for premieres, borrowing clothes from the studio and wearing their white mink stole. But, at home, I was more of a blue jeans and-tartan-shirt kind of a girl. My mother and my aunts, by contrast, were incredibly glamorous.

They wouldn't have dreamed of stepping outside the house without wearing make-up and their hair done. They would have considered it bad manners to do otherwise. But then the Forties and Fifties were intensely glamorous decades, probably as a reaction to the straitened times in which people lived.
Women looked up to movie stars such as Hedy Lamarr, Betty Grable and Joan Crawford, after whom I was named. The clothes they wore on screen were often more important than the films themselves.

I'd say from the Twenties to the Sixties, ordinary women would try the best they could to look like their favourite star. Then it all changed in the grungy Seventies, before glamour made a big comeback in the Eighties, helped in no small part by a certain television series called Dynasty.

By then I had a reputation as a woman who always made the best of herself, and who was determinedly glamorous. And that was something I learned in the school of hard knocks that was Hollywood in the Fifties.

After The Girl In The Red Velvet Swing, my next movie was The Opposite Sex with June Allyson and Leslie Nielsen. It was fantastically opulent, with fabulous clothes designed by Helen Rose. From that moment on - with the words of director Richard Fleischer still ringing in my ears - I began to get really interested in what I wore. And I've never looked back.

I invented a look with which I've stuck more or less ever since: big hair, smoky eyes and bright lipstick

I also had Marilyn Monroe's makeup man, Alan 'Whitey' Snyder, to show me how to apply my make-up properly. Just six years later, he was the person who was to make her up in her coffin.

I do my make-up now in ten minutes, faster and better, I admit, than anyone else. At the time I made The Stud and then The Bitch in the late Seventies, I invented a look with which I've stuck more or less ever since: big hair, smoky eyes and bright lipstick. My one infallible cosmetic tip? Always keep your eyebrow pencils as sharp as a pin.

So, when along came Dynasty and Alexis Carrington in the Eighties, her look was already in place - it was me! Initially, they tried to put me in little tweed jackets with pussycat bows, which just didn't work for the character.

Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Cardin were coming out with the big shoulder look, and that felt right for Alexis. It also caught the eye of Princess Diana, whose shoulder pads were sometimes bigger than mine.

My dear friend Nolan Miller had dressed everyone from Lana Turner to Betty Grable and Joan Crawford. Alexis was a woman of the world, someone familiar with couture shows. So, as the designer on Dynasty, Nolan and I would go to the department stores Saks and Neiman Marcus every Saturday and pull things off the rails that we liked.

I usually needed ten outfits a week for the show. In fact, there's an 11-minute clip on YouTube of me walking in and out of rooms, always in a different outfit. I wore more clothes than I can count. Alexis defined a decade that has become renowned for its unapologetic glamour. I suppose it defined me, too.

Joan Crawford once said: 'I feel I owe it to my public always to look good. When you're young, you can get away with the careless, ungroomed look. But not to bother with grooming over the age of 40 is a mistake.'

When you look at programmes such as Jeremy Kyle today, you wonder what the world is coming to. Those women could get a little glamour in their lives, although it would be a bit of a challenge for the ones who are very overweight.

You might think it's easy for me to say all this as a Hollywood star, but believe me every woman has it in them to look fantastic. Not so long ago, I toured the UK with my one-woman show. Everywhere I went, women would come up to me and tell me they loved the way I dressed. But how could they look good on a budget, they asked me.

That gave me an idea. So I got together with a production company and we placed an advert in the national press asking for three generations of women from the same family to get in touch if they'd like to have a bit of glamour put into their lives.

We were swamped with applications, eventually choosing the Littlefair family from Plymouth: grandmother Eileen, mum Mary and teenage daughter Holli. I genuinely liked these women and wanted to help them.

I discovered long ago that, if you look good, you feel good. Don't believe any woman who says she doesn't like a compliment. I love it if I'm walking through a store or I'm in a restaurant and someone says I look great. It lifts your spirits.

Not long ago, I had a heavy cold and cough - most unlike me - and I looked like the wrath of God. I'd catch sight of myself in the mirror, slopping around bare-faced in a dressing gown, my hair a mess - and it made me feel even worse. After three days at home, I had to go out for several appointments. And, as I put on my face and stepped into a glamorous outfit, I could feel myself getting better.

So the message is clear, girls. Glamour really is good for you.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
  Reply With Quote
10-10-2009
  79
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,206
And she also casts her eye over her own "style queens":

Quote:
There have been many glamorous women, both in public life and in show business, over the past hundred years or so. Here's my choice of the dozen most drop-dead gorgeous.

THE DUCHESS OF WINDSOR (born 1896): Quite severe, tiny and actually quite plain, but the American-born Wallis Simpson wore exquisitely tailored clothes and carried herself with such dignity and style.

MARLENE DIETRICH (born 1901): A complete original and the epitome of Thirties glamour. Not necessarily the most beautiful woman of her time, but she always wore superb clothes and had the best possible lighting. She was still enthralling audiences with her nightclub act in her 80s.

VIVIEN LEIGH (born 1913): An exquisite beauty - the most beautiful of her age - she was a great actress who knew how to dress well.

RITA HAYWORTH (born 1918): In Gilda, in that black satin strapless dress and the black satin gloves and that shock of gorgeous red hair, she defined Forties glamour.

AVA GARDNER (born 1922): The Press dubbed her 'The most beautiful animal in the world'. With her feline green eyes, fantastic body and sensational love life, she was my glamour icon!

JACKIE KENNEDY ONASSIS (born 1929): The epitome of American class and elegance. Everyone copied her style, me included. I simply adored everything she wore.

GRACE KELLY (born 1929): She was glamorous in an incredibly ladylike, East Coast kind of a way, a woman who looked sensational in a twin set and pearls with that beautiful halo of blonde hair.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR (born 1932): A true beauty who enthralled the world with her chequered love life and violet eyes.

MARILYN MONROE (born 1926): That hair! That face! That body! She positively glowed. She didn't dress very glamorously off-screen, but here was a woman who looked glamorous even in the nude. She still looks modern today in photographs from the Fifties and Sixties.

AUDREY HEPBURN (born 1929) Usually dressed by Givenchy, she was the last word in understated elegance with a beautiful voice and manners to match, an icon who is admired and emulated by the youth of today.

PRINCESS DIANA (born 1961): No one else came close to her at the time. She was the most glamorous woman in the world in the late 20th century, with great hair, beautiful eyes and an amazing wardrobe. I copied a lot of it!

CHERYL COLE (born 1983):She slightly reminds me of myself, with the big hair, smoky eyes and the full-on red lipstick. The camera just loves her.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
  Reply With Quote
13-10-2009
  80
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,206
The Guardian has put together a few classic shots, including Joan at Heathrow in 1989 with her stack of Vuitton luggage (guardian.co.uk):
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Joan-Collins-style-icon-J-003.jpg (52.8 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg Joan-Collins-style-icon-J-008.jpg (31.3 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg Joan-Collins-style-icon-J-007.jpg (33.3 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg Joan-Collins-style-icon-J-009.jpg (30.0 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg Joan-Collins-style-icon-A-006.jpg (38.0 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg Joan-Collins-style-icon-A-004.jpg (31.5 KB, 0 views)

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
  Reply With Quote
15-10-2009
  81
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,206
Joan sorts out the women of Britain - highlights from her makeover show:


__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
  Reply With Quote
15-10-2009
  82
fashion icon
 
inhirnamy137's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,263
She still looks good now, but in her younger days she was a beauty

__________________
Nobody can make you feel inferior, without your consent-Eleanor Rooselvet
  Reply With Quote
11-11-2009
  83
lady of the flowers
 
RoseMary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: maggie's farm
Gender: femme
Posts: 33,229
Joan Collins leaving Boa restaurant (Nov 9) - celebutopia.


  Reply With Quote
12-11-2009
  84
V.I.P.
 
nmyngan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,148

ebay

  Reply With Quote
12-11-2009
  85
V.I.P.
 
nmyngan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,148

kobal

  Reply With Quote
12-11-2009
  86
V.I.P.
 
nmyngan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,148


album-online

  Reply With Quote
13-11-2009
  87
V.I.P.
 
lady stardust's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: in the temple of cats...
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,679
ebay.com

__________________
A Kiss in the Dreamhouse..
  Reply With Quote
13-11-2009
  88
V.I.P.
 
nmyngan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,148


interfoto

  Reply With Quote
22-11-2009
  89
lady of the flowers
 
RoseMary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: maggie's farm
Gender: femme
Posts: 33,229
Joan Collins @ Jack Rich's Birthday Party in NYC 18.11.09 (celebrity-paradise).





  Reply With Quote
23-11-2009
  90
don't look down
 
tigerrouge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Béal Feirste
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,206
Joan talks about what she knows best (dailymail.co.uk):

Quote:
The secret to surviving the recession? Red lippy and lots of it, says JOAN COLLINS

23rd November 2009

Making up is not so hard to do. High-end cosmetics are bucking the recession with a surge in sales, according to figures. Well, can you blame us? With the price of everything soaring and most people struggling to pay for everyday necessities, a woman can cheer herself up by investing just a few quid in a lipstick or foundation.

Cosmetics and body care have been around since the dawn of civilisation, and our ancestors probably wore much more than we do. In fact, the 'natural' look - no make-up - which so many modern women seem to aspire to is a complete washout: you just show the world a face shiny with sleepiness, probably a bit spotty and with its fair share of bags, blotches and furrows, certainly if you're beyond the age of puberty.

Contrast that with the fact that during World War II, when money was tight, everything was rationed and the most basic commodities impossible to find, women went out of their way to look as attractive as possible. They scrunched up their hair in rags at night to make it curly, then padded it with horse hair. They always wore red lipstick and would melt remnants into tiny containers so as not to waste any, then use a brush to apply it with great care.

Before then, in the Great Depression of the Thirties, women tried hard to look as good as possible. Whether to cheer up their menfolk or to escape from the drudgery that was everyday life, they made a supreme effort that is apparent in the photos of that time.

So here we are in the middle of yet another great recession, depression, slump - whatever our politicians care to call it - and money is tighter than an 18th-century corset. Women still need to cheer themselves up, so what better way to do it than to decorate their faces? As the song says: 'Women may get weary wearing the same shabby dress.'

So instead of buying another shabby dress or, in today's world, another pair of jeans or a T-shirt, get out those cosmetics and slather 'em on. A lipstick can cost anything from £40 at high-end department stores to £1 in a budget High Street shop.

Top cosmetic brands have seen massive increases in sales of bright lipstick - not the dreary browns, beiges and tans that the make-up girls and magazines have been pushing for the past decade, but shiny, brilliant fuchsia, crimson and vermillion that make a girl's lips glow. Scarlett Johansson, Dita von Teese and Cheryl Cole are all proponents of this cheerful and gorgeous look.

I believe that 90 per cent of women can look prettier, healthier and happier in red lipstick, the only disadvantage being that it can leave its mark on a friend's cheek.

It's a cheerful, optimistic look, and one that the movie stars of the Thirties, Forties and Fifties used to maximum advantage (they cheered up the boys in the Services, too). In the prosperous Sixties, 'nude' lips were all the rage, but women compensated with huge hair-dos and masses of eye make-up. Looking good in today's terrible times tells the world you're feeling good, at least about yourself.

That's why sales of false eyelashes at Tesco, of all places, are up 90 per cent from last year, as they are at many big stores. Eight out of ten women believe lipstick really does cheer them up, makes them feel strong and confident, and gives them an edge over their colleagues.

A leading psychotherapist has reported that 'make-up has a positive effect on the way women feel about themselves. Stress can play havoc on the skin, and wearing make-up is part of a healthy self-nurturing which is essential for well-being'.

Now even going grey is being rejected by women: sales of home dye kits have shot up since the start of the recession. The reason is that most women would rather spend their hard-earned money on their families than visiting an expensive hairdresser.

In the U.S., nail salons are thriving - and they are cheap. A manicure for £5 and a pedicure for £8 are non-expensive ways of making a woman feel pampered. With rising unemployment and massive workforce competition, it's important for every woman to look her best.

What better way to face the world than with a perfect face, great hair and good nails? And for those critics who pooh-pooh this idea, let me say to them: just try it. It works - I know it does.

__________________
You're perfect, yes, it's true. But without me, you're only you.
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
collins, joan
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:07 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.